Seven International Soca Artistes You Should Know

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
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Any of these seven artistes can successfully headline any show or fete anywhere in the world today.:good:

https://socamusictv.blogspot.com/2018/08/seven-international-soca-artistes-you.html
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There is some misinformation in your article about when ragga soca emerged as a new Soca sub-genre as ragga soca actually emerged as "dancehall soca" during the late 1980's but the genre was eventually re-branded as "ragga soca" by producer and guitarist Kenny Phillips during the early 1990's (1993 to be exact) so you may want to correct that misinformation in item #3 that I've highlighted in red below.

QUOTE:

#3 Bunji Garlin
In the late 1990s, a new sub genre of Soca emerged in Trinidad and Tobago called ragga soca (the blending of Trinidad’s Soca with Jamaican dancehall). The leader of then ragga soca movement was Soca superstar Bunji Garlin. Garlin also known as the Viking is one of the genre’s few successful crossover artists, having had huge international success with his collaborations with Major Lazer, Machel Montano and many other acts. In 2013 the Viking released 'Differentology' which is still one of the most popular crossover Soca hits in the world today. His recent hit song 'Big Bad Soca' is having major success throughout the Soca world today.


Here is one example of the many early ragga soca tracks that were hits in T&T during the late 1980's.

Style - OC Blackman & Upstream - VA (1989)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SRjxwT8XvH4" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Vocals by O.C. Blackman & Derwin Vallie
Keyboards & Arranged By – Derwin Vallie
Lead Guitar & Bass Guitar – O.C. Blackman
Producer & Engineer – Kenny Phillips (KMP Music Lab)
 
another twist on the dancehall fusion theme - Bouyon Muffin released by the original Skinny Bantan, now known as ShadowFlow as part of WCK in 1997.

<iframe width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GAiMdupyw6A" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
There is some misinformation in your article about when ragga soca emerged as a new Soca sub-genre as ragga soca actually emerged as "dancehall soca" during the late 1980's but the genre was eventually re-branded as "ragga soca" by producer and guitarist Kenny Phillips during the early 1990's (1993 to be exact) so you may want to correct that misinformation in item #3 that I've highlighted in red below.

QUOTE:

#3 Bunji Garlin
In the late 1990s, a new sub genre of Soca emerged in Trinidad and Tobago called ragga soca (the blending of Trinidad’s Soca with Jamaican dancehall). The leader of then ragga soca movement was Soca superstar Bunji Garlin. Garlin also known as the Viking is one of the genre’s few successful crossover artists, having had huge international success with his collaborations with Major Lazer, Machel Montano and many other acts. In 2013 the Viking released 'Differentology' which is still one of the most popular crossover Soca hits in the world today. His recent hit song 'Big Bad Soca' is having major success throughout the Soca world today.


Here is one example of the many early ragga soca tracks that were hits in T&T during the late 1980's.

Style - OC Blackman & Upstream - VA (1989)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SRjxwT8XvH4" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
DANCEHALL SOCA BY BECKET, THE ORIGINATOR AND CREATOR OF WHAT IS KNOWN TODAY as RAGGA SOCA, in 1988.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3L_3J24tgA0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

This can be seen THROUGHOUT his ILLUSTRIOUS CAREER from the 1970's to the PRESENT.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
That VP fellow will eternally continue deluding himself about Becket or the Vincies starting Ragga Soca.

The main early pioneers of the dancehall soca style were artists from T&T and Jamaica but no one Caribbean country can lay exclusive claim to starting and developing the ragga soca sub-genre all by themselves.
However T&T and Jamaica were the two main heavy lifters in establishing the ragga soca sub-genre.

Here is a dancehall soca hit in the Ragga Soca vein by Byron Lee from 1985 years before the term Ragga Soca was coined by Kenny Phillips in early 1993.
Lord Laro also released a series of similar dancehall soca fusion hits during the early 1980's.
As I said this soca sub-genre emerged during the 1980's but was branded as Ragga Soca by the early 1990's.

Byron Lee & The Dragonaires - Soca Girl ( Girlie Girlie ) (1985)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UWS1WR4FBhw" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written By – Anthony "Sangie" Davis
Producer – Byron Lee & Neville Hinds
Horns Arranged By – Charles Dougherty
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
That VP fellow will eternally continue deluding himself about Becket or the Vincies starting Ragga Soca.

The main early pioneers of the dancehall soca style were artists from T&T and Jamaica but no one Caribbean country can lay exclusive claim to starting and developing the ragga soca sub-genre all by themselves.
However T&T and Jamaica were the two main heavy lifters in establishing the ragga soca sub-genre.

Here is a dancehall soca hit in the Ragga Soca vein by Byron Lee from 1985 years before the term Ragga Soca was coined by Kenny Phillips in early 1993.
Lord Laro also released a series of similar dancehall soca fusion hits during the early 1980's.
As I said this soca sub-genre emerged during the 1980's but was branded as Ragga Soca by the early 1990's.

Byron Lee & The Dragonaires - Soca Girl ( Girlie Girlie ) (1985)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UWS1WR4FBhw" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written By – Anthony "Sangie" Davis
Producer – Byron Lee & Neville Hinds
Horns Arranged By – Charles Dougherty
I do not know how many times I have to school you on this issue of BECKET and his ACE ARRANGER, Frankie McIntosh, are the CREATORS/INVENTORS of what came to be KNOWN as RAGGA SOCA.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S3I7-rB0hTQ" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

That was Becket feat. Mikey Jarrett in 1984.

Becket was the first to give it its name in MUSIC, DANCEHALL SOCA, and then Winston Soso told you what it is in his titled song called RAGGA SOCA.

Every which way you CHECK the HISTORY, ST. VINCENT and the Grenadines is at the CENTER and HEART of this GENRE.
You can try to DENY that FACT, by making WORTHLESS claims, but the MUSIC doesnt LIE nor does the HISTORY and REGIONAL and INTERNATIONAL SUCCESSES.

Becket and Frankie McIntosh are the CREATORS of RAGGA SOCA.
Moreover, RAGGA SOCA has been the HEARTBEAT of VINCY MUSIC from its BIRTH in the 1970's to the PRESENT

Here we MASHING IT UP again with VINCY RAGGA SOCA, COURTESY of FUNKY BUSINESS.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/urP6kfo65VY?showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

AH WE TING THIS.

RAGGA SOCA is the DNA of VINCY MUSIC.

YUHHHHH SEEEEE MEEEEEE
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
That VP fellow will eternally continue deluding himself about Becket or the Vincies starting Ragga Soca.

The main early pioneers of the dancehall soca style were artists from T&T and Jamaica but no one Caribbean country can lay exclusive claim to starting and developing the ragga soca sub-genre all by themselves.
However T&T and Jamaica were the two main heavy lifters in establishing the ragga soca sub-genre.

Here is a dancehall soca hit in the Ragga Soca vein by Byron Lee from 1985 years before the term Ragga Soca was coined by Kenny Phillips in early 1993.
Lord Laro also released a series of similar dancehall soca fusion hits during the early 1980's.
As I said this soca sub-genre emerged during the 1980's but was branded as Ragga Soca by the early 1990's.

Byron Lee & The Dragonaires - Soca Girl ( Girlie Girlie ) (1985)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UWS1WR4FBhw" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written By – Anthony "Sangie" Davis
Producer – Byron Lee & Neville Hinds
Horns Arranged By – Charles Dougherty
I do not know how many times I have to school you on this issue of BECKET and his ACE ARRANGER, Frankie McIntosh, are the CREATORS/INVENTORS of what came to be KNOWN as RAGGA SOCA.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S3I7-rB0hTQ" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

That was Becket feat. Mikey Jarrett in 1984.

Becket was the first to give it its name in MUSIC with his song DANCEHALL SOCA and then Winston Soso told US what VINCY CREATED GENRE is about in his song titled RAGGA SOCA.

Every which way you CHECK the HISTORY, ST. VINCENT and the Grenadines is at the CENTER and HEART of this GENRE.
You can try to DENY that FACT, by making WORTHLESS claims, but the MUSIC doesnt LIE nor does the HISTORY and REGIONAL and INTERNATIONAL SUCCESSES.

Becket and Frankie McIntosh are the CREATORS of RAGGA SOCA.
Moreover, RAGGA SOCA has been the HEARTBEAT of VINCY MUSIC from its BIRTH in the 1970's to the PRESENT

Here we MASHING IT UP again with VINCY RAGGA SOCA, COURTESY of FUNKY BUSINESS.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/urP6kfo65VY?showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

AH WE TING THIS.

RAGGA SOCA is the DNA of VINCY MUSIC.

YUHHHHH SEEEEE MEEEEEE
 

bhalistix

It is I
VINCY welcome back!!!!!!!! its been far too long since you guys had a regional hit. i know you guys gave grn and slu a little time to shine. It is even greater to see/hear its something one might argue is authentically SVG.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
I do not know how many times I have to school you on this issue of BECKET and his ACE ARRANGER, Frankie McIntosh, are the CREATORS/INVENTORS of what came to be KNOWN as RAGGA SOCA.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S3I7-rB0hTQ" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

That was Becket feat. Mikey Jarrett in 1984.

Becket was the first to give it its name in MUSIC with his song DANCEHALL SOCA and then Winston Soso told US what VINCY CREATED GENRE is about in his song titled RAGGA SOCA.

Every which way you CHECK the HISTORY, ST. VINCENT and the Grenadines is at the CENTER and HEART of this GENRE.
You can try to DENY that FACT, by making WORTHLESS claims, but the MUSIC doesnt LIE nor does the HISTORY and REGIONAL and INTERNATIONAL SUCCESSES.

Becket and Frankie McIntosh are the CREATORS of RAGGA SOCA.
Moreover, RAGGA SOCA has been the HEARTBEAT of VINCY MUSIC from its BIRTH in the 1970's to the PRESENT
This delusional fellow is schooling no one and keeps posting the same stuff over and over that proves nothing. Is this Ground Hog Day?

Every so called Ragga Soca song that VP has posted in the past from Becket, I have been able to reply to with a similar song from T&T or Jamaica that predates it, so the reality is the Vincies started nothing new and did nothing first in regards to Ragga Soca when we look at the timeline of the music recordings.

Below are two soca songs from Lord Laro with Dancehall DJ elements which predate the Becket song above.

"Irie Tempo" released by Lord Laro in 1981 is a fusion of soca and reggae and was a big hit in the Carnival fetes and on the road during the T&T 1981 Carnival season. Its the first big hit with this strong soca and reggae fusion to also feature the then very popular reggae dancehall DJ called Trinity from Jamaica.

Lord Laro feat Trinity - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OAohhUaw230" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

And here is proof that Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo" was one of the big hits for the T&T 1981 Carnival as here it is covered by Charlie's Roots featuring Tambu on lead vocals. Charlies Roots was arguably one of T&T's top soca bands of the early 1980's and was the backing band on all of Super Blue's early road march hits of the 1980's.

Manhattan Charlie's Roots feat Tambu - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OY41WXp06Dc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Arranged by Pelham Goddard; Produced by Rawlston Charles

Here is another classic from Lord Laro that came out for the 1984 T&T Carnival (early 1984 before the Becket track above posted by VP was recorded). This one has musical backing from Byron Lee & The Dragonaires.

Lord Laro - A Different Stylie (1984)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5kNCS1YcPJs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced & Arranged By Neville Hinds & J.Grey

If you listen carefully to the lyrics in Lord Laro's hit just above called "A Different Stylie" he gives Dancehall DJ's Yellow Man and Trinity a mention as they were both involved in recording songs with a soca and reggae fusion during the early 1980's. As a reminder here is a big hit from 1984 by Yellow Man with a similar fusion.

King Yellowman - Reggae Calypso (1984)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jm1ojv7VdQ4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Winston Foster; Producer – Jimmy Wynter

A little more on Lord Laro; He started his career as a calypsonian in T&T in the late 1950's and sang calypso, mento, reggae and then soca and regularly fused elements of all these music genres into his music after living between Trinidad and Jamaica during the 1960's before moving permanently to Jamaica in the 1970's. Laro's wife Norma Lara who has since passed was a very well known Jamaican.

If you also listen to Lord Laro's hit "Foreign Press" that he composed in 1975 and released in 1976 it fuses the traditional calypso beat with a bit of mento and reggae influence and I believe this same beat became a popular beat used in reggae dancehall and dancehall soca during the 1980's and 1990's. This song was a massive hit in both Jamaica and Trinidad in 1976 and uses a traditional calypso beat that can be found in hundreds of calypso recordings that predate it. "Foreign Press" also predates Becket's "Coming High".

Lord Laro - Foreign Press (1976)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RlKEANHcvxQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Also regarding VP's claim that Ragga Soca was started in the 1970's, if that is so then it sure was not started by Becket and Frankie McIntosh because based on his shaky ragga soca definition and claim of "Coming High" being the first Ragga Soca track, all the songs below that predate "Coming High" are also Ragga Soca tracks.

Here is a reminder of VP's shaky makeshift definition of ragga soca: "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE"

There are numerous calypso/soca songs from T&T artists that were recorded and released before Becket's "Coming High" that featured above elements mixed together at a groovy pace as per VP's shaky makeshift Ragga Soca definition.

Here are five for starters that were recorded and released before "Coming High":-

Lord Shorty - Bajan Girl (1973)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kiAWgKnNkZU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
From Album : Gone Gone Gone
Produced by Lord Shorty & Henry Antoine
Arranged By Lord Shorty, Ralph Moore & Tony Mergel


The Shadow - Reggae Calypso (1975)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8y_wA3kmnRg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written & Produced by Winston Bailey; Accompanied/Arranged by Art De Coteau

Ed Watson & His Brass Circle - There's A Kind Of Hush (1976)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IGlWQPWkkmk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
From Album : One More Time
Arranged By Ed Watson. 1976


Lord Laro - Foreign Press (1976)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RlKEANHcvxQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

The Shadow - Without Love (1976/1977)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lh_hX1Fleg4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Winston Bailey; Accompanied & Arranged by Art De Coteau
Produced by Richie's Music Productions


And btw the only thing in Becket's "Coming High" that can be viewed as a reggae influence in my opinion are the lyrics about "coming high with marijuana" but musically "Coming High" is much more a fusion of calypso with elements of soca and with a jazzy brass line arrangement in parts. Becket's "Coming High" is no more a so-called ragga soca track than the four calypso/soca reggae fusion tracks which I've posted above that all predate it and I can post more. VP's Ragga Soca claim for SVG is obviously fraudulent and anyone who takes the time to examine the music evidence available will see that. VP cannot fool anyone with music sense and a bit of investigation skills so to buy his argument you need to be lacking in both of those areas.

Becket - Coming High (1977)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pwD2TXeBW5s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Album : Disco Calypso
Arranged By Frankie McIntosh
Released : 1977
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
This delusional fellow is schooling no one and keeps posting the same stuff over and over that proves nothing. Is this Ground Hog Day?

Every so called Ragga Soca song that VP has posted in the past from Becket, I have been able to reply to with a similar song from T&T or Jamaica that predates it, so the reality is the Vincies started nothing new and did nothing first in regards to Ragga Soca when we look at the timeline of the music recordings.

Below are two soca songs from Lord Laro with Dancehall DJ elements which predate the Becket song above.

"Irie Tempo" released by Lord Laro in 1981 is a fusion of soca and reggae and was a big hit in the Carnival fetes and on the road during the T&T 1981 Carnival season. Its the first big hit with this strong soca and reggae fusion to also feature the then very popular reggae dancehall DJ called Trinity from Jamaica.

Lord Laro feat Trinity - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OAohhUaw230" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

And here is proof that Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo" was one of the big hits for the T&T 1981 Carnival as here it is covered by Charlie's Roots featuring Tambu on lead vocals. Charlies Roots was arguably one of T&T's top soca bands of the early 1980's and was the backing band on all of Super Blue's early road march hits of the 1980's.

Manhattan Charlie's Roots feat Tambu - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OY41WXp06Dc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Arranged by Pelham Goddard; Produced by Rawlston Charles

Here is another classic from Lord Laro that came out for the 1984 T&T Carnival (early 1984 before the Becket track above posted by VP was recorded). This one has musical backing from Byron Lee & The Dragonaires.

Lord Laro - A Different Stylie (1984)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5kNCS1YcPJs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced & Arranged By Neville Hinds & J.Grey

If you listen carefully to the lyrics in Lord Laro's hit just above called "A Different Stylie" he gives Dancehall DJ's Yellow Man and Trinity a mention as they were both involved in recording songs with a soca and reggae fusion during the early 1980's. As a reminder here is a big hit from 1984 by Yellow Man with a similar fusion.

King Yellowman - Reggae Calypso (1984)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jm1ojv7VdQ4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Winston Foster; Producer – Jimmy Wynter

A little more on Lord Laro; He started his career as a calypsonian in T&T in the late 1950's and sang calypso, mento, reggae and then soca and regularly fused elements of all these music genres into his music after living between Trinidad and Jamaica during the 1960's before moving permanently to Jamaica in the 1970's. Laro's wife Norma Lara who has since passed was a very well known Jamaican.

If you also listen to Lord Laro's hit "Foreign Press" that he composed in 1975 and released in 1976 it fuses the traditional calypso beat with a bit of mento and reggae influence and I believe this same beat became a popular beat used in reggae dancehall and dancehall soca during the 1980's and 1990's. This song was a massive hit in both Jamaica and Trinidad in 1976 and uses a traditional calypso beat that can be found in hundreds of calypso recordings that predate it. "Foreign Press" also predates Becket's "Coming High".

Lord Laro - Foreign Press (1976)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RlKEANHcvxQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri
And like always, I have to SCHOOL and EDUCATED U.

First of all, IRIE TEMPO is not RAGGASOCA.

IRIE is STRICTLY REGGAE aka FESTIVAL MUSIC out of JAMAICA

In other words, Laro mentioning calypso and soca and reference to carnival in the song do not EQUATE to the song being RAGGA SOCA.

Again, the song is STRICTLY REGGAE.

Let me give you another JAMAICAN PRODUCED SONG so as to EDUCATE U and others of LIKED MIND.

Let me give you teo of my FAVORITE SONGS by PLUTO SHERVINGTON.

Here is RAM GOAT LIVER from 1974.


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3kca32orFys" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Your HONOUR from 1985.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RRWzk1w3dJg" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

When you come to these DEBATES, KNOW the MUSIC/INSTRUMENTATION FIRST and not the LYRICS.

School is OUT ONCE MORE.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
And like always, I have to SCHOOL and EDUCATED U.

First of all, IRIE TEMPO is not RAGGASOCA.

IRIE is STRICTLY REGGAE aka FESTIVAL MUSIC out of JAMAICA

In other words, Laro mentioning calypso and soca and reference to carnival in the song do not EQUATE to the song being RAGGA SOCA.

Again, the song is STRICTLY REGGAE.

Let me give you another JAMAICAN PRODUCED SONG so as to EDUCATE U and others of LIKED MIND.

Let me give you teo of my FAVORITE SONGS by PLUTO SHERVINGTON.

Here is RAM GOAT LIVER from 1974.


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3kca32orFys" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Your HONOUR from 1985.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RRWzk1w3dJg" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

When you come to these DEBATES, KNOW the MUSIC/INSTRUMENTATION FIRST and not the LYRICS.

School is OUT ONCE MORE.
This music dunce is schooling no one and I am now convinced that he doesn't even have the ability to understand music and school himself which is why he continues to mislabel most soca songs out of SVG as raggasoca even when they clearly contain no reggae or raggamuffin dancehall DJ elements anywhere in the songs.

If "Irie Tempo" is not Ragga Soca which I am quite happy to accept as an argument then so too are most of the Becket songs that VP regularly posts and claims to be ragga soca including "Coming High".

Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo" is clearly a fusion of reggae and calypso/soca which anyone who is familiar with both music genres can hear and according to VP's own shaky definition of ragga soca "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE" this qualifies "Irie Tempo" as a ragga soca not according to my argument but according to VP's own shaky raggasoca definition.

In addition to the musical fusion between soca and reggae in Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo", it also contains a dancehall DJ doing some raggamuffin toasting in sections of the song which brings it into line with the more sensible Kenny Phillips 1993 definition of Ragga Soca.

However I am not surprised that VP tried to distract us from him having his argument clean bowled by the music evidence that I provided. Hence why he only focused on Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo" while avoiding to comment on the other Lord Laro songs that I posted, "A Different Stylie" and "Foreign Press", which just like "Irie Tempo" also predate (were recorded and released before) the 1984 Becket song "Love Is The Answer" that he posted and which all according to VP's shaky raggasoca definition also qualify them as raggasoca songs. The King Yellowman song "Reggae Calypso" also came out in 1984 and quite possibly before Becket's "Love Is The Answer" song as well.

VP has been exposed as being dishonest and deluded and even Socapineman made his own verdict on VP's shaky ragga soca arguments many months ago after I provided some of the irrefutable evidence that I also supplied again above.

VP is fooling no one with any music sense and who respects the reality of timeline music recordings but we can all guarantee that he will continue deluding himself. The fella is obviously sick in his head and is in need of medical attention.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
This music dunce is schooling no one and I am now convinced that he doesn't even have the ability to understand music and school himself which is why he continues to mislabel most soca songs out of SVG as raggasoca even when they clearly contain no reggae or raggamuffin dancehall DJ elements anywhere in the songs.

If "Irie Tempo" is not Ragga Soca which I am quite happy to accept as an argument then so too are most of the Becket songs that VP regularly posts and claims to be ragga soca including "Coming High".

Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo" is clearly a fusion of reggae and calypso/soca which anyone who is familiar with both music genres can hear and according to VP's own shaky definition of ragga soca "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE" this qualifies "Irie Tempo" as a ragga soca not according to my argument but according to VP's own shaky raggasoca definition.

In addition to the musical fusion between soca and reggae in Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo", it also contains a dancehall DJ doing some raggamuffin toasting in sections of the song which brings it into line with the more sensible Kenny Phillips 1993 definition of Ragga Soca.

However I am not surprised that VP tried to distract us from him having his argument clean bowled by the music evidence that I provided. Hence why he only focused on Lord Laro's "Irie Tempo" while avoiding to comment on the other Lord Laro songs that I posted, "A Different Stylie" and "Foreign Press", which just like "Irie Tempo" also predate (were recorded and released before) the 1984 Becket song "Love Is The Answer" that he posted and which all according to VP's shaky raggasoca definition also qualify them as raggasoca songs. The King Yellowman song "Reggae Calypso" also came out in 1984 and quite possibly before Becket's "Love Is The Answer" song as well.

VP has been exposed as being dishonest and deluded and even Socapineman made his own verdict on VP's shaky ragga soca arguments many months ago after I provided some of the irrefutable evidence that I also supplied again above.

VP is fooling no one with any music sense and who respects the reality of timeline music recordings but we can all guarantee that he will continue deluding himself. The fella is obviously sick in his head and is in need of medical attention.
This MUSICAL DUNCE is ALWAYS AMUSING.

POINT OUT the SOCA ELEMENTS in IRIE TEMPO for US.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
POINT OUT the SOCA ELEMENTS in IRIE TEMPO for US.
I already have and don't feel the need to repeat myself to a music dunce who regularly brands songs from SVG and elsewhere as ragga soca that have zero reggae or raggamuffin DJ elements.

You are also still avoiding dealing with the other Lord Laro songs that I posted, "A Different Stylie" and "Foreign Press", that also are ragga soca tracks based on your own shaky definition of ragga soca as "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE".

You are and will always be a music dunce of the highest order.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
I already have and don't feel the need to repeat myself to a music dunce who regularly brands songs from SVG and elsewhere as ragga soca that have zero reggae or raggamuffin DJ elements.

You are also still avoiding dealing with the other Lord Laro songs that I posted, "A Different Stylie" and "Foreign Press", that also are ragga soca tracks based on your own shaky definition of ragga soca as "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE".

You are and will always be a music dunce of the highest order.
I MISSED IT.

So show me so I can ADDRESS IT.

Again, what is the CHORDS PROGRESSIONS in IRIE TEMPO that is SOCA??
We AWAIT your ANSWER since you know so much about SOCA and MUSIC.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
I MISSED IT.

So show me so I can ADDRESS IT.

Again, what is the CHORDS PROGRESSIONS in IRIE TEMPO that is SOCA??
We AWAIT your ANSWER since you know so much about SOCA and MUSIC.
I won't have to explain to you what a fusion of reggae and soca sounds like if you were not such a music dunce so again you are proving my point that I am wasting my time trying to educate someone who is incapable of understanding music.

"Irie Tempo" contains elements typical to soca like a double-noted "boom boom" style bassline in parts which has been a hallmark of soca music since its inception in the early 1970's as pioneered by T&T musicians like Lord Shorty, Ed Watson, Pelham Goddard and others. "Irie Tempo" also contains a typical punchy soca style brass section arrangement in addition to lyrics about soca, calypso and carnival and what's more was covered by numerous soca bands during the 1981 T&T Carnival season when it became a major hit. The reggae and dancehall elements in the song are in the guitar strumming style and also in the DJ chanting style heard in sections of the song.

Here is "Irie Tempo" again that fuses soca and reggae and was a big hit for the T&T 1981 Carnival season. It's the first big hit with this strong soca and reggae fusion to also feature the then very popular reggae dancehall DJ called Trinity from Jamaica who even mimics the double-noted soca style bassline in a segment of his lyrics.

Lord Laro feat Trinity - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OAohhUaw230" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

And here is a version of "Irie Tempo" by Charlie's Roots featuring Tambu on lead vocals that was also recorded and released during the 1981 T&T Carnival season. Everyone who attended T&T 1981 Carnival viewed "Irie Tempo" as a soca and reggae fusion track which is why it was covered by so many top soca bands and was one of the most popular tunes in all the 1981 T&T Carnival soca fetes. Some music dunce from Vincy land who regularly mislabels straight soca music as Ragga Soca and who does not recognize the soca and reggae fusion elements in "Irie Tempo" is of zero relevance because everyone else in the world with working brain cells does.

Manhattan Charlie's Roots feat Tambu - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OY41WXp06Dc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Arranged by Pelham Goddard; Produced by Rawlston Charles

You are still trying to avoid dealing with the other two Lord Laro hit songs that I posted which also came out prior to Becket's 1984 "Love Is The Answer" song and both qualify as Ragga Soca tracks according to your own shaky definition of ragga soca as "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE" taken from Winston Soso's 1995 Ragga Soca release in which he admitted to deciding to join the popular Ragga Soca craze that had spread all over the Caribbean by that time.

Again below are two other calypso/soca songs from Lord Laro which also qualify as Ragga Soca songs based on VP's Ragga Soca definition.

Here is a hit from Lord Laro that came out for the 1984 T&T Carnival (early 1984 before Becket's "Love Is The Answer" was recorded & released). This one has musical backing by Byron Lee & The Dragonaires who was closely involved in contributing to the dancehall soca evolution during the 1980's. Dancehall Soca emerged by the mid-1980's not long after Dancehall Reggae had emerged in the late 1970's to early 1980's as a distinctive music genre from Reggae, Rockers, Dub, R&B, Soca and Calypso that were all regularly played in Jamaican Dancehall sessions during the 1970's when Reggae music emerged as the most popular style of music in Jamaica and also went international with the help of Bob Marley.

Lord Laro - A Different Stylie (1984)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5kNCS1YcPJs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced & Arranged By Neville Hinds & J.Grey

And here is Lord Laro's 1976 hit "Foreign Press" that fuses the traditional calypso beat with a slight one drop reggae influence and this same beat later became a popular beat regularly heard in both dancehall reggae and dancehall soca during the 1980's and 1990's. It should also be noted that Lord Laro's "Foreign Press" came out before Becket's "Coming High".

Lord Laro - Foreign Press (1976)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RlKEANHcvxQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

The above irrefutable evidence is more for the benefit of other readers than for VP's benefit as we all know that true to form VP will continue deluding himself about Becket and Frankie McIntosh starting Ragga Soca just as he always tries to do on this forum despite the overwhelming music evidence to the contrary.
VP is as honest about the history of Ragga Soca as the folks who tried to falsely claim that Elvis Presley is the original King of Rock 'n' Roll and was responsible for pioneering that music genre. However the timeline music evidence does not lie once you obtain and examine it by doing the proper research.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
I won't have to explain to you what a fusion of reggae and soca sounds like if you were not such a music dunce so again you are proving my point that I am wasting my time trying to educate someone who is incapable of understanding music.

"Irie Tempo" contains elements typical to soca like a double-noted "boom boom" style bassline in parts which has been a hallmark of soca music since its inception in the early 1970's as pioneered by T&T musicians like Lord Shorty, Ed Watson, Pelham Goddard and others. "Irie Tempo" also contains a typical punchy soca style brass section arrangement in addition to lyrics about soca, calypso and carnival and what's more was covered by numerous soca bands during the 1981 T&T Carnival season when it became a major hit. The reggae and dancehall elements in the song are in the guitar strumming style and also in the DJ chanting style heard in sections of the song.

Here is "Irie Tempo" again that fuses soca and reggae and was a big hit for the T&T 1981 Carnival season. It's the first big hit with this strong soca and reggae fusion to also feature the then very popular reggae dancehall DJ called Trinity from Jamaica who even mimics the double-noted soca style bassline in a segment of his lyrics.

Lord Laro feat Trinity - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OAohhUaw230" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

And here is a version of "Irie Tempo" by Charlie's Roots featuring Tambu on lead vocals that was also recorded and released during the 1981 T&T Carnival season. Everyone who attended T&T 1981 Carnival viewed "Irie Tempo" as a soca and reggae fusion track which is why it was covered by so many top soca bands and was one of the most popular tunes in all the 1981 T&T Carnival soca fetes. Some music dunce from Vincy land who regularly mislabels straight soca music as Ragga Soca and who does not recognize the soca and reggae fusion elements in "Irie Tempo" is of zero relevance because everyone else in the world with working brain cells does.

Manhattan Charlie's Roots feat Tambu - Irie Tempo (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OY41WXp06Dc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Arranged by Pelham Goddard; Produced by Rawlston Charles

You are still trying to avoid dealing with the other two Lord Laro hit songs that I posted which also came out prior to Becket's 1984 "Love Is The Answer" song and both qualify as Ragga Soca tracks according to your own shaky definition of ragga soca as "Slow DOWN the BEAT and BOUNCE the MUSIC, MIXED a REGGAE and SOCA GROOVE" taken from Winston Soso's 1995 Ragga Soca release in which he admitted to deciding to join the popular Ragga Soca craze that had spread all over the Caribbean by that time.

Again below are two other calypso/soca songs from Lord Laro which also qualify as Ragga Soca songs based on VP's Ragga Soca definition.

Here is a hit from Lord Laro that came out for the 1984 T&T Carnival (early 1984 before Becket's "Love Is The Answer" was recorded & released). This one has musical backing by Byron Lee & The Dragonaires who was closely involved in contributing to the dancehall soca evolution during the 1980's. Dancehall Soca emerged by the mid-1980's not long after Dancehall Reggae had emerged in the late 1970's to early 1980's as a distinctive music genre from Reggae, Rockers, Dub, R&B, Soca and Calypso that were all regularly played in Jamaican Dancehall sessions during the 1970's when Reggae music emerged as the most popular style of music in Jamaica and also went international with the help of Bob Marley.

Lord Laro - A Different Stylie (1984)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5kNCS1YcPJs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced & Arranged By Neville Hinds & J.Grey

And here is Lord Laro's 1976 hit "Foreign Press" that fuses the traditional calypso beat with a slight one drop reggae influence and this same beat later became a popular beat regularly heard in both dancehall reggae and dancehall soca during the 1980's and 1990's. It should also be noted that Lord Laro's "Foreign Press" came out before Becket's "Coming High".

Lord Laro - Foreign Press (1976)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RlKEANHcvxQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Written by Kenneth Lara; Produced by Paul Khouri

The above irrefutable evidence is more for the benefit of other readers than for VP's benefit as we all know that true to form VP will continue deluding himself about Becket and Frankie McIntosh starting Ragga Soca just as he always tries to do on this forum despite the overwhelming music evidence to the contrary.
VP is as honest about the history of Ragga Soca as the folks who tried to falsely claim that Elvis Presley is the original King of Rock 'n' Roll and was responsible for pioneering that music genre. However the timeline music evidence does not lie once you obtain and listen to them by doing the proper research.
LOL n SMH

What DOUBLE BOOM BOOM BASELINE R U TALKING ABOUT?

MUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

THE BOOM BOOM BASELINE IS PROMINENT in REGGAE.

Moreover, in the SONG IRIE TEMPO, the BOOM BOOM was simply used to MATCH the VOCAL NUANCE or the LYRICAL CHANGEOVER by Laro'a VOICE.

Just to PROVE the POINT, show me the SOCA SONG that MATCHES the "BOOM BOOM" baseline in IRIE TEMPO.

Moreover, all the SONGS by LARO were PRODUCED by JAMAICANS because that was where he was LIVING.

In other words, they're JAMAICAN PRODUCTIONS and JAMAICAN MUSIC, nothing to do with TRINIDAD.

All of VINCY RAGGA SOCA are PRODUCED by VINCENTIANS.

Again, RAGGA SOCA is the HEART and SOUL of VINCY MUSIC.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
HERE FOOL.

A REVIEW of IRIE TEMPO by someone who BOUGHT the SONG and who obviously knows what is REGGAE music, UNLIKE U.

"Irie Tempo by Laro is one of the best reggae tracks available anywhere. A reggae classic, it has set the bar for other artists within the same genre category."IRIE TEMPO.JPG
 
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