The difference between SOCA AND CALYPSO

D

DJ Trixx

Guest
Calypso


Origin of Calypso


Calypso rhythms can be traced back to the arrival of the first African slaves brought to work in the sugar plantations of Trinidad. Forbidden to talk to each other, and robbed of all links to family and home, the African slaves began to sing songs. They used calypso, which can be traced back to West African kaiso, as a means of communication and to mock the slave masters.


Trinidad was colonized by the Spanish, received large numbers of French immigrants, and was later ruled by the British. This multi-colonial past has greatly impacted the development of calypso in Trinidad. Many early calypsos were sung in a French-Creole dialect called patois ("pat-was"). These songs, usually led by one individual called a griot, helped to unite the slaves.


Calypso singing competitions, held annually at Carnival time, grew in popularity after the abolition of slavery by the British in the 1830s. (It was the French who brought the tradition of Carnival to Trinidad.) The griot later became known as the chantuelle and today as the calypsonian.




The Golden Age of Calypso


The year 1914 was a landmark year in the history of calypso. This is the year that the first calypso recording was made. The late 1920s gave birth to the first calypso tents. Originally, calypso tents were actual tents where calypsonians would practice before Carnival. Today calypso tents are showcases for the new music of Carnival season.


By the late 1930s, exceptional calypsonians such as Atilla the Hun, Lord Invader and the Roaring Lion were making an indelible impression on the calypso music world. Lord Kitchener rose to prominence in the 1940s and dominated the calypso scene until the late 1970s. Lord Kitchener continued to make memorable hits until his death in 2001.


In 1944, the Andrews Sisters (an American trio) did a cover version of Lord Invader's hit Rum and Coca Cola. Since then the United States and the rest of the world has identified calypso with the Caribbean.


In 1956, Harry Belafonte recorded his Calypso album containing
the famous Banana Boat Song ("Day-O") - probably the most
internationally well known calypso song. His Calypso album also
became the first album ever to sell over one million copies. This was
also the year the Mighty Sparrow burst onto the scene and took the
calypso world by storm with his legendary hit Jean and Dinah.


Jean and Dinah, which celebrated the departure of US troops from Trinidad, ushered in a new era of politically charged calypso. This politicized form of calypso, allying itself with the People's National Movement (PNM) party, facilitated Trinidad's independence from Britain in 1962. Socially and politically conscious calypso has had a major influence on many of Trinidad's most important social and political movements.


Together with Lord Kitchener, Mighty Sparrow dominated the calypso scene until the late 1970s. The Mighty Sparrow has continued to record and to date has produced some 90 albums. The National Carnival Commission (NCC) declared Carnival 2001 as "The Sparrow Carnival" in honor of his contributions. Also, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has awarded the Mighty Sparrow with the Caribbean's highest award, the Order of the Caribbean, for outstanding contribution to the development of the region.


Calypso typically involves social commentary, oftentimes laced with humorous satire on current events. Calypso is the voice of social conscience. However, not all calypsos are socially conscious calypso has always had its risqué side too.


Most of the top calypsonians from the golden age have been male; The Growling Tiger, Lord Executor and Lord Pretender, just to name a few. However, the 1960s saw the rise of Calypso Rose, the undisputed "Queen of Calypso." Over the years, Calypso Rose has written and performed songs with themes ranging from political commentaries to party songs, and has won numerous awards. Her 1996 hit Fire In Me Wire has become a calypso anthem. Calypso Rose has managed to excel in this otherwise male dominated genre.




Decline of Calypso


The 1970s saw a decline in the popularity of calypso due to outside musical influences. Jamaican reggae made its presence known as did disco and R&B from the US. Musical fusions were bound to happen. As a result, the 1970s gave birth to a more uptempo, less socially conscious version of calypso called soca. While calypso is the voice of social conscience, soca is party music. Rapso, with its calypso style lyrics and rhythms influenced by American hip-hop has also become popular. Other styles such as soca-chutney and ringbang give listeners even more musical choices.


Does this mean that calypso is a dying musical form? On the contrary, contemporary calypsonians such as David Rudder have very successfully combined calypso lyrics with dance rhythms - making the music accessible to a larger audience. There's also the annual resurgence of calypso at Carnival time lets us know that calypso is very much alive and vibrant with a bright future.


Source :http://www.caribplanet.homestead.com/101.html
West Indian Reader Fourth Edition.


So for my boy and the rest of you who seem to think Soca is not Calypso and vice versa...We now see that Soca is just another form of the GENRE known as Calypso
 
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D

DJ Trixx

Guest
deejaytrixx said:
Calypso


Origin of Calypso


Calypso rhythms can be traced back to the arrival of the first African slaves brought to work in the sugar plantations of Trinidad. Forbidden to talk to each other, and robbed of all links to family and home, the African slaves began to sing songs. They used calypso, which can be traced back to West African kaiso, as a means of communication and to mock the slave masters.


Trinidad was colonized by the Spanish, received large numbers of French immigrants, and was later ruled by the British. This multi-colonial past has greatly impacted the development of calypso in Trinidad. Many early calypsos were sung in a French-Creole dialect called patois ("pat-was"). These songs, usually led by one individual called a griot, helped to unite the slaves.


Calypso singing competitions, held annually at Carnival time, grew in popularity after the abolition of slavery by the British in the 1830s. (It was the French who brought the tradition of Carnival to Trinidad.) The griot later became known as the chantuelle and today as the calypsonian.




The Golden Age of Calypso


The year 1914 was a landmark year in the history of calypso. This is the year that the first calypso recording was made. The late 1920s gave birth to the first calypso tents. Originally, calypso tents were actual tents where calypsonians would practice before Carnival. Today calypso tents are showcases for the new music of Carnival season.


By the late 1930s, exceptional calypsonians such as Atilla the Hun, Lord Invader and the Roaring Lion were making an indelible impression on the calypso music world. Lord Kitchener rose to prominence in the 1940s and dominated the calypso scene until the late 1970s. Lord Kitchener continued to make memorable hits until his death in 2001.


In 1944, the Andrews Sisters (an American trio) did a cover version of Lord Invader's hit Rum and Coca Cola. Since then the United States and the rest of the world has identified calypso with the Caribbean.


In 1956, Harry Belafonte recorded his Calypso album containing
the famous Banana Boat Song ("Day-O") - probably the most
internationally well known calypso song. His Calypso album also
became the first album ever to sell over one million copies. This was
also the year the Mighty Sparrow burst onto the scene and took the
calypso world by storm with his legendary hit Jean and Dinah.


Jean and Dinah, which celebrated the departure of US troops from Trinidad, ushered in a new era of politically charged calypso. This politicized form of calypso, allying itself with the People's National Movement (PNM) party, facilitated Trinidad's independence from Britain in 1962. Socially and politically conscious calypso has had a major influence on many of Trinidad's most important social and political movements.


Together with Lord Kitchener, Mighty Sparrow dominated the calypso scene until the late 1970s. The Mighty Sparrow has continued to record and to date has produced some 90 albums. The National Carnival Commission (NCC) declared Carnival 2001 as "The Sparrow Carnival" in honor of his contributions. Also, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has awarded the Mighty Sparrow with the Caribbean's highest award, the Order of the Caribbean, for outstanding contribution to the development of the region.


Calypso typically involves social commentary, oftentimes laced with humorous satire on current events. Calypso is the voice of social conscience. However, not all calypsos are socially conscious calypso has always had its risqué side too.


Most of the top calypsonians from the golden age have been male; The Growling Tiger, Lord Executor and Lord Pretender, just to name a few. However, the 1960s saw the rise of Calypso Rose, the undisputed "Queen of Calypso." Over the years, Calypso Rose has written and performed songs with themes ranging from political commentaries to party songs, and has won numerous awards. Her 1996 hit Fire In Me Wire has become a calypso anthem. Calypso Rose has managed to excel in this otherwise male dominated genre.




Decline of Calypso


The 1970s saw a decline in the popularity of calypso due to outside musical influences. Jamaican reggae made its presence known as did disco and R&B from the US. Musical fusions were bound to happen. As a result, the 1970s gave birth to a more uptempo, less socially conscious version of calypso called soca. While calypso is the voice of social conscience, soca is party music. Rapso, with its calypso style lyrics and rhythms influenced by American hip-hop has also become popular. Other styles such as soca-chutney and ringbang give listeners even more musical choices.


Does this mean that calypso is a dying musical form? On the contrary, contemporary calypsonians such as David Rudder have very successfully combined calypso lyrics with dance rhythms - making the music accessible to a larger audience. There's also the annual resurgence of calypso at Carnival time lets us know that calypso is very much alive and vibrant with a bright future.


Source :http://www.caribplanet.homestead.com/101.html
West Indian Reader Fourth Edition.


So for my boy and the rest of you who seem to think Soca is not Calypso and vice versa...We now see that Soca is just another form of the GENRE known as Calyspo

Mods should make this a sticky for a day..It is good info for the Imix community.
 
D

DJ Trixx

Guest
tramericanjr said:
i agree this should be a sticky

Fat chance...Anything that can possibly start an arguement or debate never makes a sticky.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
I am betting that it is the ones who think they know it all were in disagreement with the above information.

Good stuff.
 
D

DJ Trixx

Guest
VINCYPOWA said:
I am betting that it is the ones who think they know it all were in disagreement with the above information.

Good stuff.


Not even gonna point fingers.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
"Calypso rhythms can be traced back to the arrival of the first African slaves brought to work in the sugar plantations of Trinidad. Forbidden to talk to each other, and robbed of all links to family and home, the African slaves began to sing songs. They used calypso, which can be traced back to West African kaiso, as a means of communication and to mock the slave masters."

I read the above opening paragraph about 5 times, so I can digest it clearly. Once that was accomplished, I asked myself, is the writer saying that the only place that Calypso rhythms can be traced is from the slaves that landed in Trinidad or is the writer writing this article from a Trinidadian perspective?

I find it hard to believe that while the slaves in Trinidad, who were robbed of all links to their family and home in the Motherland, just like all the slaves that came to the Caribbean, and began to sing songs, that they were the only slaves in the region that were engaged in that practice.

What do you guys think?
 
D

DJ Trixx

Guest
VINCYPOWA said:
"Calypso rhythms can be traced back to the arrival of the first African slaves brought to work in the sugar plantations of Trinidad. Forbidden to talk to each other, and robbed of all links to family and home, the African slaves began to sing songs. They used calypso, which can be traced back to West African kaiso, as a means of communication and to mock the slave masters."

I read the above opening paragraph about 5 times, so I can digest it clearly. Once that was accomplished, I asked myself, is the writer saying that the only place that Calypso rhythms can be traced is from the slaves that landed in Trinidad or is the writer writing this article from a Trinidadian perspective?

I find it hard to believe that while the slaves in Trinidad, who were robbed of all links to their family and home in the Motherland, just like all the slaves that came to the Caribbean, and began to sing songs, that they were the only slaves in the region that were engaged in that practice.

What do you guys think?

I read a couple different sources over the years on this topic..And all the info is in cohersion with anything else that I read...And I don't think it is written necessarily from a Trinidadians point of view.. I think it remains very objective.

But to question this is necessary. We know history is written by the scholars of war, and it is well documented that Calypso started in Trinidad. Maybe there were slaves in other regions of the Caribbean who followed similar practice, but the genre of music did become most popular in Trinidad. Thus, they are the victors of the War..Thus, they write the history.
 

VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
You brought up some interesting points. But, I will let others participate first before I weigh in.
 

classyivy1

An Ivy of Class
hmmm interesting...

I guess Trevor Wilkins need to start playing Maximus and Bunji on his show then :confused

Though soca was derived from calypso, I think the ole timers would never put soca and calypso in the same category. :O

I don't think that the article posted says that only Africans in Trinidad arrived in the western hemisphere with kaiso. Basically the artform that we have come to know today called calypso was developed in Trinidad because of those African slave. Here's a non-Trini perspective...

"The derivation of calypso rhythms can be traced back to the arrival of the first African slaves to Barbados and other Caribbean islands in the seventeenth century. The artform, which was developed in Trinidad, combines the skills of story-telling, singing and instrument making, and has since been influenced by European, North American and other Caribbean cultures. Calypso is a unique form of music that is an integral part of the Barbadian cultural landscape."

Taken from


http://barbados.org/music/calypso.htm

Also check this out...(I don't think it's a Trini perspective)

http://www.streetswing.com/histmain/z3calypo.htm
 

classyivy1

An Ivy of Class
Another interesting piece about the popularity of calypso in North America during the early 1900's. Wow, I'm sure most of us never knew that there was a calypso fad in this country... Sorry if it's long winded...:O


"Calypso in the Transatlantic World, 1930-1970: An Overview
Calypso, a form of topical song that originated in Trinidad, was one of the first popular music traditions from outside North America and Europe to be commercially recorded. In 1912 a top Trinidadian band led by Lovey (George Bailey) traveled to New York to record for both Columbia and Victor. Two years later Victor representatives visited Trinidad to record calypso and a variety of other local music styles. During the 1910s and 1920s, American companies continued to record calypso in New York for distribution to Caribbean and Latin American markets. It was during the 1930s, however, that recording and international distribution of calypso intensified and the international travel of calypsonians (calypso singers) increased. From the 1930s through the 1960s, media and migration disseminated calypso throughout the transatlantic world, thus creating a popular music that was detached from its original social contexts in Trinidad and adapted to a variety of new contexts in the Americas, Europe and Africa.

Outside Trinidad, calypso achieved its greatest commercial presence in the United States, where it had a significant impact on the nation's popular culture. During the 1930s several of Trinidad's top calypsonians, such as Atilla the Hun, Lion, Tiger and Executor, recorded in New York and appeared on radio broadcasts. Some of these artists also performed for the local West Indian immigrant community and for general audiences in Greenwich Village and other entertainment districts. The lyrics of their calypsos commented both on events in Trinidad and on their new experiences in the United States. During World War II the presence of American military bases in Trinidad heightened interest in calypso and paved the way for the Andrews Sisters' version of "Rum and Coca-Cola" to become one of the top hits of the era. This song, written by the calypsonian Lord Invader, sparked a major copyright battle in the courts, which Invader eventually won. During the postwar period, calypso was also incorporated into the American folk music revival through concerts such as those presented by Alan Lomax at New York's Town Hall.

A continued calypso presence in the American recording industry and clubs during the postwar years became an outright craze in 1956 with the release of Harry Belafonte's Calypso, the first album to sell over one million copies in entertainment history. From late 1956 through the first half of 1957, dozens of calypso records were released by both West Indian and American popular singers, ranging from the Duke of Iron and Lord Flea to Ella Fitzgerald, Rosemary Clooney and the Easy Riders. During this same period, nightclubs from New York and Miami to Chicago and Los Angeles hired any calypso act they could find, while calypso singers appeared in television variety shows and sitcoms. Hollywood released three calypso-themed movies, with stars like Herb Jeffries and Angie ################inson and calypso singers such as the Duke of Iron and Maya Angelou (in her pre-literary days). The entertainment industry initially believed that calypso would lead to the demise of rock and roll. Though the craze soon faded, calypso remained a component of the folk music revival of the late 1950s and 1960s and continued to be popular with vacationers in the Caribbean.

Following the 1965 Immigration Act, West Indian migration to the United States increased substantially. An expanding West Indian community in New York provided a foundation for a calypso scene that included West Indian-owned record companies in Brooklyn and regular calypso performances during the Labor Day Carnival. By the 1980s Carnivals, featuring calypso, were also developing in Boston, Washington, Miami and other American cities. Though calypso became established as a major form of expression in West Indian immigrant communities, it no longer had a high visibility in the wider American popular culture.

During the mid-twentieth century, Britain also developed a vibrant calypso scene. As British citizens, West Indians had been migrating to London since the early part of the century. By the 1930s West Indian musicians, such as Sam Manning and Cyril Blake, were actively performing in London. During World War II West Indian music became more prominent in London clubs and calypsos were broadcast on BBC Radio.

A major increase in West Indian migration to Britain in the postwar years is symbolized by the arrival in 1948 of the MV Empire Windrush, which included Trinidadian calypsonians Lord Kitchener and Lord Beginner and numerous other artists. Kitchener and Beginner began recording in London in 1950. In 1951 Trinidadian calypso singers, steelband musicians and dancers appeared at the Festival of Britain, a major cultural showcase that considerably heightened the status of local art forms back in Trinidad. During the 1950s calypsos in Britain addressed a variety of imperial topics, such as migration, cricket, royalty, colonialism and independence movements. By the time of Trinidad's independence in 1962, however, calypsonians were returning to their homeland. Though the calypso scene in Britain declined, it took on new life in the late 1960s with the rise of London's Notting Hill Carnival, which rivaled the Labor Day Carnival in Brooklyn. Though the overall popularization and commercialization of calypso in Britain during the mid-twentieth century was less extensive than in the United States, London nonetheless served as an important center of calypso creativity and international dissemination.

In the course of the twentieth century, calypso artists and recordings also reached markets in numerous other parts of the transatlantic world. Trinidadian calypso shaped similar song traditions in British Guiana (Guyana), Grenada, Barbados and other territories in the eastern anglophone Caribbean. West Indian migrants took calypso to Venezuela, Panama and Nicaragua. In the postwar years, calypso was regularly performed in tourist hotels in Jamaica, the Virgin Islands and the Bahamas. A U.S. Navy steelband, based in Puerto Rico, performed calypsos on its worldwide tours, while French Creole-speaking Antilleans and Dutch/Sranan-speaking Surinamese also experimented with the musical form. Calypso became popular in West and South Africa, through recordings and direct contact between West Indians and Africans in Africa and Britain. Calypsos were recorded and performed in France, Germany and other European countries, and became an integral component of the Caribana festival in Toronto's large West Indian community. Outside the anglophone world, calypsos were often translated into local languages and performed in styles that drew on local musical traditions. "


Taken from http://www.casbah.ac.uk/newsreport4.stm
 
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VINCYPOWA

Registered Member
It seems like Harry Belafonte has not been given the credit that he justly deserves. How is it that you can be the first to sell over one million copies of a calypso album and still be disrespected by those who obviously do not understand or appreciates the significance of his contribution to the art form?

It is seems like calypso was very popular worldwide.. I am wondering what caused its demise to the point where soca had to be created.
Interesting.
 
D

DJ Trixx

Guest
VINCYPOWA said:
It seems like Harry Belafonte has not been given the credit that he justly deserves. How is it that you can be the first to sell over one million copies of a calypso album and still be disrespected by those who obviously do not understand or appreciates the significance of his contribution to the art form?

It is seems like calypso was very popular worldwide.. I am wondering what caused its demise to the point where soca had to be created.
Interesting.

No he isn't....

If I had to hypothesize on the downfall of Soca's popularity, I would guess when the Spanish influence in the music became less aparent and the beats came faster, it made it harder for worldwide listeners to understand what the hell these artists were saying...

Songs Like Day-O are easily understood..


Now here is something to think about. From reading these 2 articles we get a clear understanding that traditional Calypso was that of social commentary and was very political in nature, while soca was the opposite...Does this mean that sond like Day-O and Hot, Hot, Hot, we actually soca, thus making the artists who sang them, Soca Artists? :confused
 
M

MrBlackRock

Guest
Listen, soca is de watered down , dumbed down version of calypso... think about it.. for years songs have been called soca, placed in barbados road march and you feel dem calling ting soca? soca is a subsidiary of calypso. the reason why calypso artists recognize soca is because they know that calypso takes more towards the craft... its a shame that when every calypso song gets popular that its considered a soca song? are u fuccking kidding me?

edwin win monarch and road march wid de same song.... Obadele <<<<< now lets break it down

soca heads feel its a song biggin up obadele thompson.... to articulate dance and prance

calypso heads KNOW dat its a song that has lyrical strength

"frustration in de nation , and dem focusin on de youth....
de young people in trouble dem barely getting through"

clearly its a with a message that calls for de youth to get on the bandwagon and lead de charge....

Soca train by maximus come out 15 years ago it would be considered a calypso song....

the difference between soca and calypso is monetary. period... trust me, a good lyrically strong , political commentary, cleaver crafty song ain getting my rass pon brass n glow ,,,,,,or to miami or to boston to sing it.... dat is why people abandoning de strength of we culture.. soca ain getting we nuh fackin where dat is why we gine bring out tunes and get call reggae, cause we dumbing our shit down and we'll eventually be so fuccked up that american artists and producers will sample our shit and use it as their own.... that is not culture, and surely not what west indians are known for... we are innovators not advocates of sameness
 
P

Pebbles362436

Guest
In 1956, Harry Belafonte recorded his Calypso album containing
the famous Banana Boat Song ("Day-O") - probably the most
internationally well known calypso song. His Calypso album also
became the first album ever to sell over one million copies. This was
also the year the Mighty Sparrow burst onto the scene and took the
calypso world by storm with his legendary hit Jean and Dinah.


Jean and Dinah, which celebrated the departure of US troops from Trinidad, ushered in a new era of politically charged calypso. This politicized form of calypso, allying itself with the People's National Movement (PNM) party, facilitated Trinidad's independence from Britain in 1962. Socially and politically conscious calypso has had a major influence on many of Trinidad's most important social and political movements.


Together with Lord Kitchener, Mighty Sparrow dominated the calypso scene until the late 1970s. The Mighty Sparrow has continued to record and to date has produced some 90 albums. The National Carnival Commission (NCC) declared Carnival 2001 as "The Sparrow Carnival" in honor of his contributions. Also, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has awarded the Mighty Sparrow with the Caribbean's highest award, the Order of the Caribbean, for outstanding contribution to the development of the region.


Calypso typically involves social commentary, oftentimes laced with humorous satire on current events. Calypso is the voice of social conscience. However, not all calypsos are socially conscious calypso has always had its risqué side too.


:bowdown Thanks for this information. Anyone who has the opportunity to work and speak directly with the Mighty Sparrow he will have no problems giving you the entire 411 on the history with both him and Harry's contributions to the calypso music industry.:cool: All this stuff has already been documented and people sometimes just have to be willing to do a little research to get the real facts on the issues. :O
 
M

Mad Scorpion

Guest
This is truly pointless!

Interesting readin material but in the end it is two different types of music with two totally different aims


gen·re Pronunciation Key (zhänr) n.

A category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, marked by a distinctive style, form, or content:

Now if soca and calypso aren't distinctively different well what can I say. If our unimaginative musical rulers decide that they want to be stuck in the past then who am I to question it. I believe rap music was spawned from Jazz so I guess Jay Z is a Jazz artist!

Like I said above absolutely pointless!
 
D

DJ Trixx

Guest
WICKED SCORPION said:
This is truly pointless!

Interesting readin material but in the end it is two different types of music with two totally different aims


gen·re Pronunciation Key (zhänr) n.

A category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, marked by a distinctive style, form, or content:

Now if soca and calypso aren't distinctively different well what can I say. If our unimaginative musical rulers decide that they want to be stuck in the past then who am I to question it. I believe rap music was spawned from Jazz so I guess Jay Z is a Jazz artist!

Like I said above absolutely pointless!

Not pointless...Fact. thanks for the definition though.

And a music genre spawned by another, of course is a new genre..But I don't feel this is the case as far as Calypso and Soca is concerned...Same shit, just Soca is a little played down.

We can compare differences all day long. But the fact remains, that all Soca artists sing calypso, since it is the genre of the music....Just like all Dancehall artists sing reggae...

If we are going to use the word Soca to categorize then fine, but we cannot use it to define....because then we are using it incorrectly.. and being Caribbeans, or of Caribbean decent, we should be the most informed and most careful with our words describing out culture, since the rest of the world screws it up.


I find ur comparison to be insultive....JayZ rap to Jazz....fine.....yeah it came out of it....But it is a completely different thing.

Nas and JayZ both sing rap..Maybe we should declare unnderground and commercial rap 2 entirely different things.
 
M

Mad Scorpion

Guest
deejaytrixx said:
Not pointless...Fact. thanks for the definition though.

And a music genre spawned by another, of course is a new genre..But I don't feel this is the case as far as Calypso and Soca is concerned...Same shit, just Soca is a little played down.

We can compare differences all day long. But the fact remains, that all Soca artists sing calypso, since it is the genre of the music....Just like all Dancehall artists sing reggae...

If we are going to use the word Soca to categorize then fine, but we cannot use it to define....because then we are using it incorrectly.. and being Caribbeans, or of Caribbean decent, we should be the most informed and most careful with our words describing out culture, since the rest of the world screws it up.


I find ur comparison to be insultive....JayZ rap to Jazz....fine.....yeah it came out of it....But it is a completely different thing.

Nas and JayZ both sing rap..Maybe we should declare unnderground and commercial rap 2 entirely different things.
Since many underground rap song use the exact same samples, instruments, and vernacular (not to mention some that go on to become commercial hits) it is completely retarded to even say that as comparison to my P.O.V. on soca and calypso.

So I guess based on the defination of the word genre that Soca and Calypso in its traditional form are hard to diffrentiate right? There is no distinctive difference between them.

gen·re Pronunciation Key (zhänr) n.

A category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, marked by a distinctive style, form, or content


Soca = Party Music
Calypso = Social and Political Commentary

Somehow I can see a marked difference in style, form and content, but hey maybe my grasp of the english language is beyond the evolution of calypso music:O
 
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