Bahamas New Immigration Laws Effected 11/01/2014

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STEADY WUK
As the government prepares to clamp down on illegal residents in the country, Prime Minister Perry Christie said the government will execute the new immigration policy in a humane way and take steps to minimize any pain or suffering.
The new policies, which take effect today, will require all non-Bahamians to have a passport of their nationality and evidence that they have permission to live and work in the country.
The policy also states that the Department of Immigration will not accept first time applications for residence or work permits from those who have no legal status in The Bahamas.
"We want always to ensure that what we are doing is understood and that [we] minimize the extent to which there is human suffering," he said.
"These are matters that are always important to public policy and ultimately I have the responsibility for."
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell has said that "those who are not here lawfully should expect increased vigilance and enforcement".
Christie admitted that the Carmichael Road Detention Centre does not have enough room to detain a large number of people.
But he said the government has identified another space.
"We have other buildings that must be activated," he said.
"We have the space, we have the resources there. We propose to do that. But everything you do with respect to people some of whom have lived in your country, albeit illegally, for a long time, represents a human critical subject.
"Therefore, you want to take every means to ensure that you have taken all of the steps necessary to minimize pain, suffering, and upheaval. These are issues that must affect us as we move forward to enforce new policies that are intended to be in protection of the Bahamian people, which include many people who were once illegal and who have been made citizens of our country."
Yesterday, The Guardian visited a shantytown off Faith Avenue that the government is currently clearing down.
Sainfora Guillema, 67, a resident of the shanty, said she has her papers in order.
However, her home, one of three remaining structures in the shantytown, is set to be demolished next week.
"Now I don't have no place to go because I don't work," she said.
"I don't have any money. If people tell me to move where do I go to lay down? I don't have any place to lay down. I can't go back to Haiti because I don't have any money to go."
Guillema, who has lived in The Bahamas for almost 41 years, said she heard that immigration will start rounding up people on Monday.
Another resident, who identified himself as Ayo, said he does not have his papers in order but isn't worried about the new policies.
"No, I don't mind going back to Haiti," he said. "That's my place. Why would I mind?"
 

robblaten

New member
New Immigration Policy To Take Effect Nov. 1st 2014 - YouTube


Mother-Father-Children......Even if you are born in the Bahamas to illegal immigrants you will be deported. Their homes / towns will be destroyed.....sad
picture a situation where literally thousands of people come to a country INTENTIONALLY have children looking for status, build shantytowns on government or private property and fill our hospitals and schools, placing a HUGE burden on government services. You have to look at it in that context to be fair.

Many of thousands of Haitians do it the right way and are here legally working with permits. Virtually all manual labour is done by Haitians, with no problem. It is the law breakers being targetted.
 

robblaten

New member
The accents of the news people and ministers do not sound like the accents I hear on the Bahamian streets ...

These people sound almost sound American
Perry Christie and Fred Mitchell sound American to you?

It may be that you are listening to modern, urban nassau street slang and mistaking it for a blanket Bahamian accent. But most of us speak like those you call American, but we definitely DO NOT consider it American.
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
yes a lot of black people in the bahamas sounds very much american. My first visit there i thought that black americans were being imported in droves to serve the casinos ect....but it seems like these are born and bred bahamians.
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Just pointing out that it's different from what I have heard
And I am by no means versed on Bahamian
Plus I said " almost". -
 

Lucianite

Registered User
yes a lot of black people in the bahamas sounds very much american. My first visit there i thought that black americans were being imported in droves to serve the casinos ect....but it seems like these are born and bred bahamians.
Oh you find so too eh
Y is this guy acting like I said something that was soo off ?
 

robblaten

New member
yes a lot of black people in the bahamas sounds very much american. My first visit there i thought that black americans were being imported in droves to serve the casinos ect....but it seems like these are born and bred bahamians.
There are basically two accents in the Bahamas. Most black (especially pure black) Bahamians came from South Carolina, Alabama and New York State after the Brits lost the American war of Independence. They came with their masters in a proportion of about 20 slaves to each white. That is when the Bahamas went from being mostly white to mostly black.

Another (smaller) group of blacks, like my paternal Grandfather, were 'freed Africans', generally Yorubas, from Spanish ships headed to Cuba that the British navy captured while enforcing its unilateral prohibition of the slave trade. They were settled in settlements around Nassau like Adelaide, Gambier, Delaporte and Fox Hill (my grandfather's) and basically continued as very Africanised villages until the early 20th Century.

Most white Bahamians, and blacks from Long Island, Eleuthera and Abaco still have the original (pre-Loyalist) Bahamian accent that is very close to Bermuda (our original settler) and Turks and Caicos ('Deddy', instead of Daddy etc.).

Today there is a huge merge of all these influences in Nassau. But the relation to American accents is not something new, but has deep historic roots, just like eating grits.
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
There are basically two accents in the Bahamas. Most black (especially pure black) Bahamians came from South Carolina, Alabama and New York State after the Brits lost the American war of Independence. They came with their masters in a proportion of about 20 slaves to each white. That is when the Bahamas went from being mostly white to mostly black.

Another (smaller) group of blacks, like my paternal Grandfather, were 'freed Africans', generally Yorubas, from Spanish ships headed to Cuba that the British navy captured while enforcing its unilateral prohibition of the slave trade. They were settled in settlements around Nassau like Adelaide, Gambier, Delaporte and Fox Hill (my grandfather's) and basically continued as very Africanised villages until the early 20th Century.

Most white Bahamians, and blacks from Long Island, Eleuthera and Abaco still have the original (pre-Loyalist) Bahamian accent that is very close to Bermuda (our original settler) and Turks and Caicos ('Deddy', instead of Daddy etc.).

Today there is a huge merge of all these influences in Nassau. But the relation to American accents is not something new, but has deep historic roots, just like eating grits.
Interesting.......and with regrads to Turks and Caicos (Grand Turk specifically) I noticed much the same.
 

robblaten

New member
New Immigration Policy To Take Effect Nov. 1st 2014 - YouTube


Mother-Father-Children......Even if you are born in the Bahamas to illegal immigrants you will be deported. Their homes / towns will be destroyed.....sad
Being born in the Bahamas does not give automatic citizenship like the USA. I think the Bahamas is like the rest of the Caribbean region in that regard. Surely I would not be entitled to Trini, Jamaican or Bajan citizenship just because my parents were on a cruise there when I popped out.
 

robblaten

New member
How do the Haitians arrive in the Bahamas ?
Is a visa required ?
Yes a visa is required and very difficult to get. But they come by boat and simply run into the bushes at like 4 or 5 in the morning. My own gardener came by boat in 1980. He tells me the harrowing story and it is almost unbelievable, especially the part about bathing first in some voodoo enhanced water that caused the Defence Force boats not to see them. There are no toilet facilities on the sailing sloops and they (men and women) have to go overboard.

In the good sailing months, about two sloops a month make it to New Providence's southern coast, although now the defence force has so many ships that probably a majority are apprehended.
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Yes a visa is required and very difficult to get. But they come by boat and simply run into the bushes at like 4 or 5 in the morning. My own gardener came by boat in 1980. He tells me the harrowing story and it is almost unbelievable, especially the part about bathing first in some voodoo enhanced water that caused the Defence Force boats not to see them. There are no toilet facilities on the sailing sloops and they (men and women) have to go overboard.

In the good sailing months, about two sloops a month make it to New Providence's southern coast, although now the defence force has so many ships that probably a majority are apprehended.
you are part of the problem by hiring them .. no ?

Same thing in the U.S, - immigrants are needed for labor and get hired by the very same people trying to stem the tide
 

robblaten

New member
you are part of the problem by hiring them .. no ?

Same thing in the U.S, - immigrants are needed for labor and get hired by the very same people trying to stem the tide
We did not hire when when he was illegal. My father hired him back in 1986, by which time he had gotten papers. Back then, an illegal simply had to have a prospective employer advertise a gardener position, and when no Bahamian came forward, the migrant would be granted a permit.

Now, the PLP and Fred Mitchell have stopped that and say that you have to apply at home before coming.
 

sharkie

New member
Being born in the Bahamas does not give automatic citizenship like the USA. I think the Bahamas is like the rest of the Caribbean region in that regard. Surely I would not be entitled to Trini, Jamaican or Bajan citizenship just because my parents were on a cruise there when I popped out.
Pause and come again before you call out people country. If you born in Trinidad, you are a Trinidadian and are treated like a Trinidadian to the fullest extent.
 

robblaten

New member
Pause and come again before you call out people country. If you born in Trinidad, you are a Trinidadian and are treated like a Trinidadian to the fullest extent.
....hold on a minute. I am on the phone with Haiti telling them that. Look out for a tidal wave in the next few hours or so.
 
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