Do caribbean people identify with the struggles of the "African Americans"

Rory

Banned
NT said:
whats your take....??
Some Caribbean people do and some don't. In a sense, every Black person in this part of the world is an African American and even with our tremendous diversity, there is an undeniable Oneness that binds us together. Many of today's African Americans can trace our not-too-distant roots to the islands of the Caribbean and there is also a history of migration from the U.S. mainland to the region in the sea. For at least a few centuries, Afrikans (Blacks) around the world have been identifying, supporting and sharing in each others' struggles and achievements. As we continue along the path of recovery and Collective Self-Actualisation, this pattern will thankfully keep replicating itself





you are an optimist!!!
Yes...and with very good reasons




 

TriniDivaWoman

DarkWingDuck
Some Caribbean people do and some don't. In a sense, every Black person in this part of the world is an African American and even with our tremendous diversity, there is an undeniable Oneness that binds us together. Many of today's African Americans can trace our not-too-distant roots to the islands of the Caribbean and there is also a history of migration from the U.S. mainland to the region in the sea. For at least a few centuries, Afrikans (Blacks) around the world have been identifying, supporting and sharing in each others' struggles and achievements. As we continue along the path of recovery and Collective Self-Actualisation, this pattern will thankfully keep replicating itself

[/CENTER]
Thanks....very precise and to the point....:good:
 

mz_JazE

Southern Belle
NO (Some do, but not enough) and if the question was vice versa, NO would be the answer too. If the question was do African Americans identify with the struggles of Africans in Africa....the answer would be a resounding NO as well. If the question was again, do Africans in Africa identify with the struggles of African Americans I'd say no too, not enough.!! And this is our problem as Africans worldwide.....this is why blacks all over can be used, abused, dis-advantaged, etc without the fear of reprise.

(Now, I beleive there are a number of Blacks who are aware and do identify and understand each other's 'struggles' around the world yesss, but for the most part i say No. Part of "Their" strategy, that is working, was just THAT, anyways, to have black people not see each other as one in the same no matter where in the world they are. Divide and rule ting nuh. ) I say alot of African Americans experience a sense of detachment from the motherland and from other Blacks around the world... me too sometimes...

Do u see the Chinese for e.g....they identify with the struggles of Chinese people worldwide.....beacuse they are unified as a race no matter wey dey is.....but not blacks...Blacks need to understand and drive home the mantra...."Touch One, Touch All"!!
Yeah black people's struggles are the same in America as they are in the caribbean and in many ways the struggles of mankind are the same all over. But there is a difference with AAs in that for the most part they have lived among the same people who have enslaved and then oppressed them from jump. At least we have lived in societies where our leaders and role models looked like us...where we didn't have the added layer of our blackness as an archilles heal...maybe our social status....but not our blackness.

Despite this difference AAs can stack up their achievements against any black group in the diaspora and will probably come out on top.
There have been some remarkable achievements and remarkable stories in the African American story that we all should be proud of. The history and legacy of AAs take a back seat to none. Too bad that many of them (and us) aren't aware of much of this storied history.

One thing about AAs is that they are not shy to talk about "whites" and "white superiority" concepts in the face of white people. Something that many of us in the caribbean seem unable or unwilling to do when in the company of whites less we be branded as whites...in fact many of us seek strive to have whites regard us as "different" from AAs and stupidly where this as a badge of honor.

Just to add... If BLACKS shut their mouth and walk down the road, people see our color, race, creed, then automatically consider us as AFRICAN.... But if we open our mouths, then there is a difference: our accents!! The true question is WHO ARE WE REALLY??? Yes, i was born in Trinidad and Tobago, but who am I???? I am African!!! An Indian person born in Trinidad is never referred to as a Trini; He/she is generally called an Indian. Same goes for Chineese and Syrian, and so fort... But why is it that as Black people, we never brand ourself as African??? What are we ashamed of??? Or is it that we've become so decentralised and our materialism is leading us to become disconnected from our physical place and from one another....

AFRICANS in the Diaspora as a whole, are hypocrits. The first facet that I want to draw out is our emergent culture of materialism. This seems to be our dominant ethic, not limited to the Caribbean, of course. It may be that we are led along in this by others, and not having the confidence to formulate and position our own world view in contradistinction, we allow this to become a dominant facet of our own culture, willingly adopted, not resisted. And i'm talking about AFRICAN CULTURE here. Our capitulation is reinforced by official endorsement that the monetary value of the product we generate is the ultimate measure of our progress and achievement and development as societies. This measure is the dominant one in Trinidad & Tobago’s 20/20 Vision. Here, that is in T&T, we have become part of the extractive mindset of the industrial order, with no concern about sustainability, and little regard for inter-generational equity. We are scornful of the notion that humanity must harmonise its demands with Earth’s capacities. In other words, we don't give a shit about anything but what we can gain!!! Fukking Selfish!!! And that's the Diasporan African way of living, (ceterus parabis)...Then I want to draw attention to our culture of individualism. Each person for themself; ‘me’ at the expense of the ‘other’, breakdown of the authority and stability of family, school, community; and scant regard for the value of those relationships for creating and sustaining the social order. Simple,,,,, Africans are just DISCONNECTED!!!
:read: I agree with these posts ladies!
 
S

Spoogie

Guest
nah...not b4..u mentione4d her..i just googled her though..will read up some more. she is an activist...etc..
A former adviser to Barack Obama's presidential campaign who once called Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton a "monster" is now working on the transition team for the agency that Clinton may lead.

State Department officials said Friday that Samantha Power is among foreign policy experts the president-elect's office selected to help the incoming administration prepare for Clinton's anticipated nomination as secretary of state.

The Obama transition team's Web site includes Power's name as one of 14 members of the "Agency Review Team" for the State Department.

During the Democratic primary campaign, Power called Clinton "a monster" in an interview. She then resigned, calling her remarks inexcusable and contradictory to her admiration for Clinton.
 
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