Frantz fanon

Lucianite

Registered User
http://www.psyencelab.com/images/Frantz_Fanon_and_Colonialism.pdf


Adopting another culture‘s language, Fanon (1952) states, is ―above all to assume a culture‖ (p. 2). In the presence of the oppressor, the colonized unavoidably assume that because their native language is so dissimilar from the new dominant population, they are intrinsically inferior. The native constantly compares and analyzes his ability to speak like the colonizer and dominant culture. U
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Adopting another culture‘s language, Fanon (1952) states, is ―above all to assume a culture‖ (p. 2). In the presence of the oppressor, the colonized unavoidably assume that because their native language is so dissimilar from the new dominant population, they are intrinsically inferior. The native constantly compares and analyzes his ability to speak like the colonizer and dominant culture. Upon comparison, the native is in a state of high proclivity todevelop an inferiority complex, one that resides at the root of multiple psychosomatic consequences for the colonized individual. Fanon (1952) proclaims that the native Martiniquan individual learns at an early age to assume the language of the oppressor, for it is his only course to freedom and prosperity.

In the chapter The Black Man and Psychopathology, Fanon (1952) discusses how fictional literature, comic books, and educational history books subtly disseminate the idea that the black man is one in the same with the white man who brings truth to the savages. In the teaching and reading of these works, the black child adopts the subjective attitude of the white man, and ―invests in the hero, who is white‖ (Fanon, 1952, p. 126). This leads to a life of wishing to be like the colonizer, and an inferiority complex that increases on every occasion in which they are confronted with the fact that they are not (Fanon, 1952).
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Fanon (1952) analyzes what is referred to as negrophobia, a phobia possessed by the white man that lies at the heart of his racism toward the blacks. Using a Freudian/Jungian-like analysis to explain this phobia, Fanon theorizesthatitsrootslayintheblacksavage‘sperceivedsexualpotencyandsuperiority. InFanon‘sopinion,the black man is viewed as a ―penis symbol,‖ one whose archetype is constructed by white fictitious notions such as ―they‘re sexual beasts,‖ and ―God only knows how they must make love! It must be terrifying‖ (Fanon, 1952, pp. 135-136). The black man is no longer viewed as a man, but solely as a penis. In an attempt to discount these notions, Fanon (1952) presents data on a study from Dr. Palés, concluding that the average length of the African‘s penis is seldom greater than 120 millimeters (4.68 inches); he conjointly includes case notes from clients who worked as prostitutes that firmly discount the notion that sexual intercourse with black men is significantly better than intercourse with other races. Fanon explains that this racism is derived from the fear of the black‘s sexual potency and an unreal, perceived biological danger to the white man. This insightful piece by Fanon, composed early in his academic career, provides much of the basis for his theory describing the etiology of psychopathology in the oppressed.
 
Top