Having a child abroad.....be aware..they may be stateless..

T

Toppa_Toppa

Guest
Is that so?! So dem ex pat kids who born in trini to two expats is not ah trini? Wha bout all dem Chinee workers who make pickney there??? Waw, I didn know dat!

Hang on, chinee children could be called pickney? I does call all chirrun pickney,regardless of race.
According to the constitution you are not a citizen if at the time of your birth neither parent was a citizen of TnT.

There's most likely some process for naturalisation, you're just not accorded citizenship based soely on jus soli.


1. Subject to subsection (2), every person born in Trinidad and Tobago after the commencement of this Constitution shall become a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago at the date of his birth.

2. A person shall not become a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago by virtue of subsection (1), if at the time of his birth-

a. neither of his parents is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and either of them possesses such immunity from suit and legal process as is accorded to an envoy of a foreign sovereign power accredited to Trinidad and Tobago; or

b. either of his parents is an enemy alien and the birth occurred in a place then under occupation by the enemy.

 

LB

Peace Love n Pretty Tings
I know the US highly discourages dual citizenship and the immigration ppl will tell you to give up your 2nd citizenship but technically they cannot. :grin: Alot of ppl think they cannot hold dual US citizenship but you can.

I have two Canadian-born friends who moved to the US to work and they both retain both citizenships. Both walk with dual passports.

One travels on her US passport when she goes into the States and travels on her Canadian one when she leaves. But they tried to tell her that she'd have to destroy her Canadian one but her lawyer said no way. She can hold both whether they like it or not.
 

saucytrini

can u handle me?
US State Department Services Dual Nationality

The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.

A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance.

However, dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country has the right to enforce its laws, particularly if the person later travels there.Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. citizenship.Most countries permit a person to renounce or otherwise lose citizenship.
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
When did this change?

I met a Cuban girl here a couple years ago who got her T&T citizenship through her long dead grandfather. She did a lot of digging up and found out she was eligible to be granted TT citizenship and she did it, bye-bye Cuba and Jamaica. We met in the HC here in Ja and she was trying to get the TT passports for her mother and siblings. See why allyuh must keep allyuh old people papers???
Waw! Is that so???!!! hmmmm

I ent know bout dat. I know dey does ask you for the birth certificate of your T&T parent when applying for citizenship...never had no experience wid grand and great grand and great great grand.

Steups wait til the day I find out one of my grand parents or their parents was from another island, streups, I am one of the only straight Trinbagonians who I know who´s only Trinbagonian, no Vincy, no Bajan no Grenadian no other island mix up like most T&T´s I know.
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
According to the constitution you are not a citizen if at the time of your birth neither parent was a citizen of TnT.

There's most likely some process for naturalisation, you're just not accorded citizenship based soely on jus soli.


1. Subject to subsection (2), every person born in Trinidad and Tobago after the commencement of this Constitution shall become a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago at the date of his birth.

2. A person shall not become a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago by virtue of subsection (1), if at the time of his birth-

a. neither of his parents is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and either of them possesses such immunity from suit and legal process as is accorded to an envoy of a foreign sovereign power accredited to Trinidad and Tobago; or

b. either of his parents is an enemy alien and the birth occurred in a place then under occupation by the enemy.

Thank you for this, I´m loving this thread! I´m learning so much!
 

EloquenceInc

Get your passport & come !
US State Department Services Dual Nationality

The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.

A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance.

However, dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country has the right to enforce its laws, particularly if the person later travels there.Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. citizenship.Most countries permit a person to renounce or otherwise lose citizenship.
USCIS says straight up they can allow dual citizenship but DO NOT LIKE IT.

But they can't stop another country from recognize you as a citizen if you are one, so basically america don't like to recognize dual citizenship, but the other country will.
 
T

Toppa_Toppa

Guest
I know Mexicans will lose their citizenship if they become naturalised to another country.
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
According to the constitution you are not a citizen if at the time of your birth neither parent was a citizen of TnT.

There's most likely some process for naturalisation, you're just not accorded citizenship based soely on jus soli.


1. Subject to subsection (2), every person born in Trinidad and Tobago after the commencement of this Constitution shall become a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago at the date of his birth.

2. A person shall not become a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago by virtue of subsection (1), if at the time of his birth-

a. neither of his parents is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and either of them possesses such immunity from suit and legal process as is accorded to an envoy of a foreign sovereign power accredited to Trinidad and Tobago; or

b. either of his parents is an enemy alien and the birth occurred in a place then under occupation by the enemy.

That applies if your parents are workers for a foreign government or diplomats etc.. where usually it is a given that any child born in a foreign country will retain the citizenship of the parents even if born overseas.. and i know that's true cos the Venezuelan ambassador's daughter who went to high school with me, her siblings were born all over the damn place but they all were Venezuelan citizens regardless of if they were born in Italy, Thailand or Venezuela.. so if both parents are foreigners and one of them is a diplomat then trini that child will not be but if is two grenadian having a baby in tnt.. then that child is a trini..

I know the US highly discourages dual citizenship and the immigration ppl will tell you to give up your 2nd citizenship but technically they cannot. :grin: Alot of ppl think they cannot hold dual US citizenship but you can.

I have two Canadian-born friends who moved to the US to work and they both retain both citizenships. Both walk with dual passports.

One travels on her US passport when she goes into the States and travels on her Canadian one when she leaves. But they tried to tell her that she'd have to destroy her Canadian one but her lawyer said no way. She can hold both whether they like it or not.
yea you retain your other citizenship but in some countries you simply reapply for it or maybe you dont have to.. but if u a foreign woman and u marry a saudi man i think you have to become a saudi citizen or something so..

Waw! Is that so???!!! hmmmm

I ent know bout dat. I know dey does ask you for the birth certificate of your T&T parent when applying for citizenship...never had no experience wid grand and great grand and great great grand.

Steups wait til the day I find out one of my grand parents or their parents was from another island, streups, I am one of the only straight Trinbagonians who I know who´s only Trinbagonian, no Vincy, no Bajan no Grenadian no other island mix up like most T&T´s I know.
lol..
 

saucytrini

can u handle me?
UK Border Agency | Can I be a citizen of two countries?


When becoming a British citizen

You do not need to give up your present citizenship or nationality to become a British citizen.

Many countries will not let you have two nationalities (dual nationality). If you become a British citizen and are a national of a country which does not allow dual nationality, the authorities of that country may either regard you as having lost that nationality or may refuse to recognise your new nationality. Before you apply for British citizenship you may wish to check what your position would be with the authorities of the country of which you are a citizen.
If you become a national of another country

You will not normally lose your British nationality if you become a citizen or national of another country. If you are a British subject otherwise than by connection with the Republic of Ireland you will lose that status on acquiring any other nationality or citizenship. If you are a British protected person you will lose that status on acquiring any other nationality or citizenship.

If you are becoming a citizen or national of a country that does not allow dual nationality, you may be required by that country to give up your British nationality.
If you are married to a national of another country

Under the nationality laws of some countries, a married person automatically has his or her partner's nationality. Children may also have a parent's nationality even if they were born abroad. If your wife, husband or child is visiting the country of your nationality, you should check with the country's consulate or high commission in the United Kingdom before you travel.
Travelling abroad

Under international law, we cannot give you diplomatic help if you are in a country of which you are a national. For example, if you hold both British and Chinese nationality we would be unable to give you diplomatic help when you are visiting China.

If you are planning to visit your former homeland, and you are not sure whether you have lost your old nationality, you should check with the country's consulate or high commission in the United Kingdom before you travel. If you have not lost the old nationality and want to give it up, they will be able to tell you what to do.
 

saucytrini

can u handle me?
Dual Nationality- U.S. Embassy Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

The Saudi government does not recognize dual nationality. Saudi authorities have confiscated the U.S. passports of U.S. citizens and U.S.-Saudi dual nationals when they have applied for Saudi citizenship or a Saudi passport. This does not constitute loss of U.S. citizenship but should be reported to the U.S. Embassy in Riyadh or the Consulates General in Jeddah or Dhahran. For additional information, please refer to the Bureau of Consular Affairs dual nationality flyer.
 

saucytrini

can u handle me?
Multiple citizenship encouraged

Some countries consider multiple citizenship desirable as it increases opportunities for their citizens to compete globally, and/or have taken active steps towards permitting multiple citizenship in recent years (e.g., Switzerland since 1 January 1992 and Australia since 4 April 2002).[7] India has introduced a form of overseas citizenship, which stops just short of full dual citizenship and is in all aspects, like Permanent Residency.[8]
 

saucytrini

can u handle me?
Multiple citizenship prohibited/discouraged

Some countries consider multiple citizenship undesirable and take measures to prevent it. This may take the following forms:

1. Automatic loss of citizenship if another citizenship is acquired voluntarily (e.g., China, Denmark, Japan).

2. Possible (but not automatic) loss of citizenship if another citizenship is acquired voluntarily (e.g., Singapore[4]).

3. Automatic loss of citizenship if children born with multiple citizenships do not renounce the other citizenships after reaching the age of majority (e.g., Japan).

4. Criminal penalties for exercising another citizenship (e.g., Saudi Arabia).

In popular discourse, reference to countries that "recognise" multiple citizenship may refer only to the lack of any specific statute forbidding multiple citizenship (leaving aside the difficulties of enforcing such statutes).

However, it is possible to become a citizen of multiple countries even if some or all of these countries forbid dual or multiple citizenship. For example, Germany and Austria usually do not allow dual citizenship except for persons who obtain more than one citizenship at the time of birth,[5] but Germans and Austrians can apply for a permit to keep their citizenship (Beibehaltungsgenehmigung) before taking a second one (e.g., Arnold Schwarzenegger holds Austrian and US citizenship).

Spain allows dual citizenship with some Latin-American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Peru), Andorra, Portugal, the Philippines and Equatorial Guinea. Spain does not require citizens of these countries who wish to naturalise to renounce their existing citizenship.[6]

Multiple citizenship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
T

Toppa_Toppa

Guest
That applies if your parents are workers for a foreign government or diplomats etc.. where usually it is a given that any child born in a foreign country will retain the citizenship of the parents even if born overseas.. and i know that's true cos the Venezuelan ambassador's daughter who went to high school with me, her siblings were born all over the damn place but they all were Venezuelan citizens regardless of if they were born in Italy, Thailand or Venezuela.. so if both parents are foreigners and one of them is a diplomat then trini that child will not be but if is two grenadian having a baby in tnt.. then that child is a trini..

lol..
I am not entirely sure how the provision is interpreted. I don't think people care at all. My cousin's mother was born in the US but lived her entire life in Trinidad without having Trini citizenship or any real 'legal' presence.


neither of his parents is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and either of them possesses such immunity from suit and legal process as is accorded to an envoy of a foreign sovereign power accredited to Trinidad and Tobago;

:dntknw:
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
I am not entirely sure how the provision is interpreted. I don't think people care at all. My cousin's mother was born in the US but lived her entire life in Trinidad without having Trini citizenship or any real 'legal' presence.


neither of his parents is a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and either of them possesses such immunity from suit and legal process as is accorded to an envoy of a foreign sovereign power accredited to Trinidad and Tobago;

:dntknw:
the problem of citizenship only comes up if you are a diplomat yes.. if your cousin's mother was married to a Trini then probably little cause for concern.. she probably got a work permit if she worked but lived her life as normal..
 
T

Toppa_Toppa

Guest
the problem of citizenship only comes up if you are a diplomat yes.. if your cousin's mother was married to a Trini then probably little cause for concern.. she probably got a work permit if she worked but lived her life as normal..
No her parents were Trini so they just took her back after she was born and she just lived her whole life without any legal presence in Trinidad - went to school and everything. It was only after she had moved to the US and then wanted to move back permanently to trinidad (all her belongings and stuff) that she ran into the issues.
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
No her parents were Trini so they just took her back after she was born and she just lived her whole life without any legal presence in Trinidad - went to school and everything. It was only after she had moved to the US and then wanted to move back permanently to trinidad (all her belongings and stuff) that she ran into the issues.
if her parents are trini then she is trini by descent... all she had to do is produce one of her parents birth certificate and she would have no issues... i have quite a few cousins born in the US livin in tnt normal normal.. they do come here periodically for whatever reason.. and my godsons are both yankee to trini parents.. and again visit here ever so often..
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
the problem of citizenship only comes up if you are a diplomat yes.. if your cousin's mother was married to a Trini then probably little cause for concern.. she probably got a work permit if she worked but lived her life as normal..
I thnk nobody probably ever studied her as she was probably married to a T&T man and had T&T children...she probably never worked a job where she ever had to present a NIS number, because trust me, work permeits aren´t that easy to come by for T&T and they are only ever valid for a two year period of time, at a time...exceptions are made in diplomatic circles.
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
I thnk nobody probably ever studied her as she was probably married to a T&T man and had T&T children...she probably never worked a job where she ever had to present a NIS number, because trust me, work permeits aren´t that easy to come by for T&T and they are only ever valid for a two year period of time, at a time...exceptions are made in diplomatic circles.
trinidad is all about who you know.. if she knows somebody she could get a permit for as long as she needed one.. and thats' a fact..
 
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