Is Tobago the most African island in the Caribbean?

Missmayling

Registered User
I feel like Mayling is very ignorant of certain things and should not make blanket statements without facts, she always doing this

and even when she presenting her opinion, she presents her opinions as fact
I feel its time for you to milk your prostrate
 

Carib2

Registered User
So, it what way Dennery looks like "Africa" and where in Africa ?

see I have never been to Africa

and Dennery is typical of any lil fishing village in the caribbean and some other places
I didn't say it looks like Africa and said it has an African feel the way people communicate, the feeling in the air....
 

Lucianite

Registered User
"Whether or not we realize it, we are constantly using language to evolve our ideas and beliefs into concrete reality. By becoming more aware of the impact and power of language, we can make more conscious, insightful choices about how we express ourselves and how we interpret others.
 

robblaten

New member
The Mystery JUJUBE | Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas | Bahamas Local News - Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas

Our working day was winding down, everyone was in a sharing mode, and in walked our office manager, with a beautiful, green fruit that we were certain was an apple. We were shockingly mistaken, for this large, juicy fruit was actually one that is, by our knowledge, known to be one of the smaller fruits commonly known to us. We considered this fruit huge because by normal standards, by our standards, it should have been at least three times smaller than it actually was. This was a "jujube", a fruit that is well known and loved by most, if not every Bahamian.

The word "juju" as it is pronounced by most Bahamians is explained by Wikipedia as a word of either West African or French origin. It was used previously by Europeans to describe traditional West African religions. Today it refers specifically to objects, such as amulets, and spells used superstitiously as part of witchcraft in West Africa.
.

If you have Obeah, then Its Akan or Ashanti. That tribe went mostly to Jamaica, Bahamas,Belize, the dutch colonies and Guyana. Obeah spread with jamaican slaves and migrants to the other WI countries. YOu guys should also you have Bre rabbit and Ananci stories. Bre rabbit is AA, and Ananci is Ashanti.
Yes, exactly, a juju is a FRUIT, not a name for obeah in the Bahamas. I am not sure what other islands call what we call jujus, but it is small, very sour and in my opinion quite tasty.
 

robblaten

New member
It don't know anything about your country, so you will have to point out the similarities and differences. Ananci is akan or ashanti and may have went to your country because of BWI system, not so much the tribes that were there. I know Brer rabbit is southern, but AA ancestors are from Angola, Nigeria, etc. so common sense should be it should be in countries where those tribes went to as well. what tribes went to your country?
In the Bahamas, Anansy usually appears as 'Anany'. There is a very old folk song that goes: 'Do anany, do anany
do anany how you do?
hey hey, do anany do

Anany went to New Orleans
All she ate was Pork and Beans
hey hey do anany do
 

Seawall

Registered User
In the Bahamas, Anansy usually appears as 'Anany'. There is a very old folk song that goes: 'Do anany, do anany
do anany how you do?
hey hey, do anany do

Anany went to New Orleans
All she ate was Pork and Beans
hey hey do anany do
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XBtO-V0M050" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Trini group Kalyan did a version also.
 

Missmayling

Registered User
Yes, exactly, a juju is a FRUIT, not a name for obeah in the Bahamas. I am not sure what other islands call what we call jujus, but it is small, very sour and in my opinion quite tasty.
according to you, so many AA went to the Bahamas. so based on that, then their culture should as well. So, all I did was google JUJU/Bahamas and articles popped up showing the AA link is alive in your country. The religion didn't survive, but the word did.
 

Missmayling

Registered User
language, phrases (moreso than americans), popular culture (sports, fashion, etc)
At one point, the never set on the British Empire. Many phrases, musical influences and food are not British in origin. A "tote" or bag is an example. Tote is an African word.
 
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