Jamaican broadcaster and comedian "Johnny" harassed by Trini immigration officers

Georgeflash

Who feels it knows it!
Jamaican broadcaster and comedian "Johnny" harassed by Trini immigration officers

Broadcaster Johnny Daley harrassed by T&T Immigration and Customs officers
Friday, January 10, 2014


DESPITE claims by Trinidad and Tobago officials that Jamaicans are not being singled out for bad treatment when they arrive at the Piarco Airport, popular broadcaster and comedian Christopher 'Johnny' Daley is claiming to have been mistreated by airport officials.

Daley vented his anger at the shabby treatment on the social network website Facebook on Tuesday and said he felt like a criminal even though he broke no immigration law and was not in possession of any contraband or banned items.

In November, the denial of 13 Jamaicans who were forced to sit on a hard bench, taunted by airport officials and sent back to Jamaica drew the ire of many Jamaicans who called for a ban on Trinidadian products.

The issue forced Trinidadian Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar to send a delegation, headed by her foreign minister Winston Dookeran, to hold diplomatic talks with his Jamaican counterpart A J Nicholson.

Dookeran then promised to allow for free travel into that country but his fellow parliamentarian and Trinidadian security minister, Gary Griffith, shot down his promise and vowed to keep out 'undesirables'.

Griffith said immigration matters fell under his ministry and only he could make such pronouncements. He said Trinidad was not a shopping mall.

Daley, in his Facebook post, said: "I had my worst travel experience entering the twin-island Republic of Trinidad and Tobago last night and I'm sorry to say it but Jamaicans are targeted and profiled because it happened to me and my wife.

"A J Nicholson, Mr Minister of Foreign Affairs, there is much work to be done. We were suspects the minute we walked up to immigration. Without scanning our passports the Indian-looking officer took up a phone and called someone to indicate that she felt suspicious. Whilst on the phone, with the receiver by her ears, she then asked a few questions as to the purpose of our trip. She was told. She then asked if we were actually married and was responded to. The officer then pointed out that I had several work permits (for other countries in my passport) to the person on the phone, as if that was her reason for being suspicious. She then scanned our books and asked us to sit across the way and wait.

"After fifteen minuets or so she called us over and handed our passports and sent us through. If the checks had ended there this note would not be written but as soon as we got to our bags and entered the Customs line it was clear that the Customs enforcement team that was waiting was prepped to look out for the suspects, 'aka Jamaican criminals'."

Daley said that he and his wife were the only ones searched by hand, and were asked to break open one of the beef patties they were taking for their hosts, after which the officer broke several pieces of the ginger they were asked to take by their hosts, and squeezed the harddough bread so hard that "it lost its shape".

The interrogation, Daley said, continued by the Customs officer, while two policemen in plain clothes stood by. He was, among other things, asked how long he had been in Jamaica, if he had a criminal record, his travel history.

Daley wrote: "She seemed quite disappointed and annoyed that she found nothing alarming in our luggage and then she did the most ridiculous thing I've ever experienced. She asked if I was wearing two trousers (remember I live in the tropics ) to which my response was an obvious no. Without hesitation she instructed me to go to a room with the two thug-looking men (police). I shook my head and reluctantly entered the tiny room. One thug stood at the door the other asked me to lift my shirt up. I did since I had my undershirt on. He gave me a pat down, searched the seam of my pants and then told me to step out.

"This has never happened before in all my years of travelling, not even in the United States, a country that is constantly having to protect its borders from terrorists. It was humiliating.

"[Minister] Nicholson, there was no respect shown to me and my wife. The Trinidad airport personnel seem to personally enjoy dragging us through the mud of their system. Suffice to say we barely made the connecting flight to Tobago and got attitude from the Caribbean airline staff on the ground for being late for boarding. Oh, and they left our luggage, by the way. Fortunately our hosts in Tobago could drop a few names and it was later delivered.

"My fellow Jamaicans, please have all your ducks in a row and your T's crossed if you need to travel to Trinidad and Tobago because we are being targeted. They had no good reason to treat my wife and I the way they did so I can only assume it's our nationality that was the issue. It's as if the immigration and Customs personnel have replaced The word Jamaican with criminal, so please be careful."

Broadcaster Johnny Daley harrassed by T&T Immigration and Customs officers - News - JamaicaObserver.com
 

robblaten

New member
Broadcaster Johnny Daley harrassed by T&T Immigration and Customs officers
Friday, January 10, 2014


DESPITE claims by Trinidad and Tobago officials that Jamaicans are not being singled out for bad treatment when they arrive at the Piarco Airport, popular broadcaster and comedian Christopher 'Johnny' Daley is claiming to have been mistreated by airport officials.

Daley vented his anger at the shabby treatment on the social network website Facebook on Tuesday and said he felt like a criminal even though he broke no immigration law and was not in possession of any contraband or banned items.

In November, the denial of 13 Jamaicans who were forced to sit on a hard bench, taunted by airport officials and sent back to Jamaica drew the ire of many Jamaicans who called for a ban on Trinidadian products.

The issue forced Trinidadian Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar to send a delegation, headed by her foreign minister Winston Dookeran, to hold diplomatic talks with his Jamaican counterpart A J Nicholson.

Dookeran then promised to allow for free travel into that country but his fellow parliamentarian and Trinidadian security minister, Gary Griffith, shot down his promise and vowed to keep out 'undesirables'.

Griffith said immigration matters fell under his ministry and only he could make such pronouncements. He said Trinidad was not a shopping mall.

Daley, in his Facebook post, said: "I had my worst travel experience entering the twin-island Republic of Trinidad and Tobago last night and I'm sorry to say it but Jamaicans are targeted and profiled because it happened to me and my wife.

"A J Nicholson, Mr Minister of Foreign Affairs, there is much work to be done. We were suspects the minute we walked up to immigration. Without scanning our passports the Indian-looking officer took up a phone and called someone to indicate that she felt suspicious. Whilst on the phone, with the receiver by her ears, she then asked a few questions as to the purpose of our trip. She was told. She then asked if we were actually married and was responded to. The officer then pointed out that I had several work permits (for other countries in my passport) to the person on the phone, as if that was her reason for being suspicious. She then scanned our books and asked us to sit across the way and wait.

"After fifteen minuets or so she called us over and handed our passports and sent us through. If the checks had ended there this note would not be written but as soon as we got to our bags and entered the Customs line it was clear that the Customs enforcement team that was waiting was prepped to look out for the suspects, 'aka Jamaican criminals'."

Daley said that he and his wife were the only ones searched by hand, and were asked to break open one of the beef patties they were taking for their hosts, after which the officer broke several pieces of the ginger they were asked to take by their hosts, and squeezed the harddough bread so hard that "it lost its shape".

The interrogation, Daley said, continued by the Customs officer, while two policemen in plain clothes stood by. He was, among other things, asked how long he had been in Jamaica, if he had a criminal record, his travel history.

Daley wrote: "She seemed quite disappointed and annoyed that she found nothing alarming in our luggage and then she did the most ridiculous thing I've ever experienced. She asked if I was wearing two trousers (remember I live in the tropics ) to which my response was an obvious no. Without hesitation she instructed me to go to a room with the two thug-looking men (police). I shook my head and reluctantly entered the tiny room. One thug stood at the door the other asked me to lift my shirt up. I did since I had my undershirt on. He gave me a pat down, searched the seam of my pants and then told me to step out.

"This has never happened before in all my years of travelling, not even in the United States, a country that is constantly having to protect its borders from terrorists. It was humiliating.

"[Minister] Nicholson, there was no respect shown to me and my wife. The Trinidad airport personnel seem to personally enjoy dragging us through the mud of their system. Suffice to say we barely made the connecting flight to Tobago and got attitude from the Caribbean airline staff on the ground for being late for boarding. Oh, and they left our luggage, by the way. Fortunately our hosts in Tobago could drop a few names and it was later delivered.

"My fellow Jamaicans, please have all your ducks in a row and your T's crossed if you need to travel to Trinidad and Tobago because we are being targeted. They had no good reason to treat my wife and I the way they did so I can only assume it's our nationality that was the issue. It's as if the immigration and Customs personnel have replaced The word Jamaican with criminal, so please be careful."

Broadcaster Johnny Daley harrassed by T&T Immigration and Customs officers - News - JamaicaObserver.com
Isn't it time you Jamaicans started to look inside yourselves and ask why it is that almost everywhere on earth with experience of Jamaican immigration has a hostile reaction to entering Jamaicans. How you can direct all your blame at other countries is really quite beyond me. I would be angry at all my countrymen giving us all a bad name, frankly.
 
have no issues in what was done...... he wasnt denied entry... Alot of people enter the country with stuff, and never get caught, I rather be safe than sorry.... especially the crime situation in TNT
 

Georgeflash

Who feels it knows it!
I listen to Johnny every morning on my way to work and he was one of the first people to denounce the boycott conversations when it started. Even had Trinidadians call in to his show saying how the Jamaican reaction was overblown.

Now he learns first hand.

Don't lie wid dawgs yuh don't wake up wid fleas.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Broadcaster Johnny Daley harrassed by T&T Immigration and Customs officers
Friday, January 10, 2014


DESPITE claims by Trinidad and Tobago officials that Jamaicans are not being singled out for bad treatment when they arrive at the Piarco Airport, popular broadcaster and comedian Christopher 'Johnny' Daley is claiming to have been mistreated by airport officials.

Daley vented his anger at the shabby treatment on the social network website Facebook on Tuesday and said he felt like a criminal even though he broke no immigration law and was not in possession of any contraband or banned items.

In November, the denial of 13 Jamaicans who were forced to sit on a hard bench, taunted by airport officials and sent back to Jamaica drew the ire of many Jamaicans who called for a ban on Trinidadian products.

The issue forced Trinidadian Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar to send a delegation, headed by her foreign minister Winston Dookeran, to hold diplomatic talks with his Jamaican counterpart A J Nicholson.

Dookeran then promised to allow for free travel into that country but his fellow parliamentarian and Trinidadian security minister, Gary Griffith, shot down his promise and vowed to keep out 'undesirables'.

Griffith said immigration matters fell under his ministry and only he could make such pronouncements. He said Trinidad was not a shopping mall.

Daley, in his Facebook post, said: "I had my worst travel experience entering the twin-island Republic of Trinidad and Tobago last night and I'm sorry to say it but Jamaicans are targeted and profiled because it happened to me and my wife.

"A J Nicholson, Mr Minister of Foreign Affairs, there is much work to be done. We were suspects the minute we walked up to immigration. Without scanning our passports the Indian-looking officer took up a phone and called someone to indicate that she felt suspicious. Whilst on the phone, with the receiver by her ears, she then asked a few questions as to the purpose of our trip. She was told. She then asked if we were actually married and was responded to. The officer then pointed out that I had several work permits (for other countries in my passport) to the person on the phone, as if that was her reason for being suspicious. She then scanned our books and asked us to sit across the way and wait.

"After fifteen minuets or so she called us over and handed our passports and sent us through. If the checks had ended there this note would not be written but as soon as we got to our bags and entered the Customs line it was clear that the Customs enforcement team that was waiting was prepped to look out for the suspects, 'aka Jamaican criminals'."

Daley said that he and his wife were the only ones searched by hand, and were asked to break open one of the beef patties they were taking for their hosts, after which the officer broke several pieces of the ginger they were asked to take by their hosts, and squeezed the harddough bread so hard that "it lost its shape".

The interrogation, Daley said, continued by the Customs officer, while two policemen in plain clothes stood by. He was, among other things, asked how long he had been in Jamaica, if he had a criminal record, his travel history.

Daley wrote: "She seemed quite disappointed and annoyed that she found nothing alarming in our luggage and then she did the most ridiculous thing I've ever experienced. She asked if I was wearing two trousers (remember I live in the tropics ) to which my response was an obvious no. Without hesitation she instructed me to go to a room with the two thug-looking men (police). I shook my head and reluctantly entered the tiny room. One thug stood at the door the other asked me to lift my shirt up. I did since I had my undershirt on. He gave me a pat down, searched the seam of my pants and then told me to step out.

"This has never happened before in all my years of travelling, not even in the United States, a country that is constantly having to protect its borders from terrorists. It was humiliating.

"[Minister] Nicholson, there was no respect shown to me and my wife. The Trinidad airport personnel seem to personally enjoy dragging us through the mud of their system. Suffice to say we barely made the connecting flight to Tobago and got attitude from the Caribbean airline staff on the ground for being late for boarding. Oh, and they left our luggage, by the way. Fortunately our hosts in Tobago could drop a few names and it was later delivered.

"My fellow Jamaicans, please have all your ducks in a row and your T's crossed if you need to travel to Trinidad and Tobago because we are being targeted. They had no good reason to treat my wife and I the way they did so I can only assume it's our nationality that was the issue. It's as if the immigration and Customs personnel have replaced The word Jamaican with criminal, so please be careful."

Broadcaster Johnny Daley harrassed by T&T Immigration and Customs officers - News - JamaicaObserver.com
Seems to me that the immigration staff were doing their jobs as its better to be safe than sorry and since the couple were in order and were allowed entry I don't think any laws were broken.
Could it be that this unknown Jamaican comedian expected VIP treatment from the immigration staff and was unhappy that he did not get it and was treated just like anyone else who may have looked suspicious?
 

Missmayling

Registered User
Seems to me that the immigration staff were doing their jobs as its better to be safe than sorry and since the couple were in order and were allowed entry I don't think any laws were broken.
Could it be that this unknown Jamaican comedian expected VIP treatment from the immigration staff and was unhappy that he did not get it and was treated just like anyone else who may have looked suspicious?
Yup
 

trinifrombx

Registered User
Isn't it time you Jamaicans started to look inside yourselves and ask why it is that almost everywhere on earth with experience of Jamaican immigration has a hostile reaction to entering Jamaicans. How you can direct all your blame at other countries is really quite beyond me. I would be angry at all my countrymen giving us all a bad name, frankly.
I could not of stated it any better !


Them quick to beat their chest that they are the best, yet, they refuse to call out their Govt officials who are wrecking their economy , refuse to call out the lowlives , yet every single country a Jamaican go they cause trouble and they are not welcomed !


Regarding the article, why they not mad at the U.S.A. .? I am sure they get worse treatment there ,a set of Damn Fools if you ask me!
 

Missmayling

Registered User
I could not of stated it any better !


Them quick to beat their chest that they are the best, yet, they refuse to call out their Govt officials who are wrecking their economy , refuse to call out the lowlives , yet every single country a Jamaican go they cause trouble and they are not welcomed !


Regarding the article, why they not mad at the U.S.A. .? I am sure they get worse treatment there ,a set of Damn Fools if you ask me!
you have the nerve to compare US customs with some third world type airport
in TNT??? They started out ok with checking out the passport, however the way his luggage was treated shows that the airport security needs more training.

 

trinifrombx

Registered User
you have the nerve to compare US customs with some third world type airport
in TNT??? They started out ok with checking out the passport, however the way his luggage was treated shows that the airport security needs more training.

Lmao, I would tell you what I think you are, but I won't due to retaliation from Dragon, but let me say this, what does the video have to do with the topic ?


Again, tell me one country Jamaicans went where Govt didn't want allyuh back in their country ?


Wow, so we third world now ?

So what does that make Jamaica ,forth world ?


Alluh full a pride, yet, don't own shit, no economy, no dignity, want to invade folks country, etc, why not just stay home in Allyuh proud land ?
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
Wow! that dude was a mule carrying 41 packs of cocaine inside his body. That is incredible!
Good job by the agents!

Don't know how it relates to the OP of this thread other than to underscore the fact that immigration agents have a job to do at the airport and they should be allowed to do it.
 

robblaten

New member
Lmao, I would tell you what I think you are, but I won't due to retaliation from Dragon, but let me say this, what does the video have to do with the topic ?


Again, tell me one country Jamaicans went where Govt didn't want allyuh back in their country ?


Wow, so we third world now ?

So what does that make Jamaica ,forth world ?


Alluh full a pride, yet, don't own shit, no economy, no dignity, want to invade folks country, etc, why not just stay home in Allyuh proud land ?
exactly
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
Lmao, I would tell you what I think you are, but I won't due to retaliation from Dragon, but let me say this, what does the video have to do with the topic ?


Again, tell me one country Jamaicans went where Govt didn't want allyuh back in their country ?


Wow, so we third world now ?

So what does that make Jamaica ,forth world ?


Alluh full a pride, yet, don't own shit, no economy, no dignity, want to invade folks country, etc, why not just stay home in Allyuh proud land ?
buh how yuh mean? allyuh just jealous de yardies caw the world knows that dey could dance like ah airplane and run fast.

(just having a lil fun people...keep yuh pants on!)
 

Missmayling

Registered User
Lmao, I would tell you what I think you are, but I won't due to retaliation from Dragon, but let me say this, what does the video have to do with the topic ?


Again, tell me one country Jamaicans went where Govt didn't want allyuh back in their country ?


Wow, so we third world now ?

So what does that make Jamaica ,forth world ?


Alluh full a pride, yet, don't own shit, no economy, no dignity, want to invade folks country, etc, why not just stay home in Allyuh proud land ?
The video shows how professional Customs officers seen in most developed countries like the US operates. So, Jamaicans would not have issues with US customs, because they are trained to spot suspects.
So yes TNT airport is third world and the security needs training. For a country like that with so much problems,you would think they would have better things to do at the airport like doing their Jobs. For a country so rich, they should have drug sniffing dogs,working X-ray machines etc. Also, you are not reading about Trini being targeted for tit for tat by Jamaican Customs tells me that the the joint training with US and British Customs is working. Clearly more work needs to be done in JA as Jamaica made the list for producers/ transit countries for illegal drugs.

Major illicit drug-producing and/or drug-transit countries
Afghanistan
The Bahamas
Bolivia
Brazil
Burma
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Guatemala
Haiti
India
Jamaica
Laos
Mexico
Nigeria
Pakistan
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Venezuela
 

notorious saga

Sagattarius
Not all Jamaicans on the bandwagon.

Jamaicans divided over boycott of T&T goods

Story Created: Jan 10, 2014 at 8:05 PM ECT


Jamaicans appear split on calls for a boycott of goods made in Trinidad and Tobago, but an overwhelming majority are up in arms over the decision by that country to refuse entry to 13 Jamaicans, including a child, late last year.
Last November, a campaign was launched for a boycott of Trinidadian goods, following news that immigration officers had refused entry to the 13 Jamaicans. At that time, it appeared that local consumers were ready to stop buying biscuits, juices, peanuts, and other goods made in Trinidad and Tobago that stock the shelves of stores and supermarkets islandwide.

The call seemed to be getting traction as segments of the commercial sector as well as the parliamentary Opposition seemed set to join the boycott.
But a recently completed test of the public pulse commissioned by Jamaica National Building Society and done by Johnson Survey Research showed less than four in every ten Jamaicans (38 per cent) are supporting the boycott call. According to the survey, a plurality of those interviewed, 46 per cent, or a shade below half, said no to the boycott while 16 per cent were unmoved either way.
The public response is a disappointment for rural, primary-school teacher Kesreen Green Dillon, who initiated the boycott using the social media.
“I am very, very disappointed,” Green Dillon said. “So many things have been going on and so many Jamaicans targeted and I think a boycott would give us a chance to buy Jamaican, which would help us grow,” she added.

She accepted that persons would have formed their position based on their socialisation, but questioned how could Jamaicans not support a boycott in light of the many reports of unfair treatment by immigration officers in that country.
The latest incident came last week when a popular local actor claimed that he and his wife were singled out and mistreated by Trinidadian officials last Monday, shortly after arriving in Port of Spain.
But the less-than-convincing support for the boycott came despite the vast majority of Jamaicans, 75 per cent, saying they were aware of the incident when the 13 people were turned back at the Piarco International Airport, and 61 per cent was adamant that the Trinidadians were wrong in their action, even though officials in the twin-island republic have repeatedly denied that they were locked out because they were from Jamaica.
Only 15 per cent of the respondents agreed with the decision to refuse the Jamaicans entry.

The Trinidadians have listed several reasons for denying entry to the Jamaicans, including no indication of how they would finance their stay.
“For all 13 cases, the immigration officers had good reason to deny them entry,” Trinidad’s Minister of National Security, Gary Griffith, told The Gleaner recently, as he listed individual reasons why the persons were denied entry.
A total of 1,008 residents of Jamaica aged 18 and older were interviewed across the island in the survey conducted on December 7, 8, 14 and 15, 2013.
—Jamaica Gleaner
 
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