Let's Compare Caribbean English Dialects and Creoles

SKBai1991

Registered User
St. Kitts sound like a Jamaican trying to Standard English, but with a funny way of pronouncing "ar".
lol arwe nuh sound so tall...we accent a bit more melodic and we pronounce different

yep, u shoulda add Gullah to this, cuz truly their accent/dialect is Caribbean.
No, they're black americans same as all di rest ah dem. dey does resemble arwee vaguely but mi ain kno wha dem a say still
 

kidray

Registered User
Agreed, but they sound too much like Bahamians. I'll add it though.

*edit* I saw you add it.



Nah, he's from Limon, Costa Rica. He does throw back Calypso
I find that they sound like People from the Turks and Caicos too.I find in Bahamian creole/Turk and Caicos they don't use the words Deh,

I used to live in Grand Turk for 5 yrs..people from salt cay say"wehicle" V is subbed for W vice versa
 

Inquistive

New member
I don't care what any of you say. The Bahamian and Bajan accent are very similar. They both have strong Rhotic affinities.Very ironic since they are the furthest apart.
 

A.K.K.S.

New member
It is though. Its not highly rhotic, but it is somewhat rhotic

Honestly in the Caribbean only a few Creole languages are fully Rhotic or non-rhotic. Most are in the middle.
  • Trinidadian = fully non-rhotic
  • Jamaican, Guyanese and the Central American Creoles = partially rhotic
  • Bajan = Mostly rhotic
  • Cayman Islands and Bay Islands = Fully rhotic
 

SKBai1991

Registered User
  • Trinidadian = fully non-rhotic
  • Jamaican, Guyanese and the Central American Creoles = partially rhotic
  • Bajan = Mostly rhotic
  • Cayman Islands and Bay Islands = Fully rhotic
You could add Kittitian, the VI, Dominica, St Lucia and Grenada to the fully non-rhotic list as well.
 
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