Lynn Taitt - The Trini who created Jamaican Rocksteady

Inquistive

New member
GF, mind you. This guy said a while ago a Trini invented hiphop. I nearly smacked my monitor.


They're not to be taken seriously.
 

Namey Namey

Registered User
Man goes to Jamaica to play soca, sees all this musical genius going on. Decides to stay in Jamaica because he wanted to be a part of it.

He decided to produce, hes still producing jamaican music, created by Jamaicans.

Lets not get carried away
 
Man goes to Jamaica to play soca, sees all this musical genius going on. Decides to stay in Jamaica because he wanted to be a part of it.

He decided to produce, hes still producing jamaican music, created by Jamaicans.

Lets not get carried away
dumbass Namey, when Taitt went to Jamaica, Soca was not in existence, you know nothing about music so shut up.
 
GF, mind you. This guy said a while ago a Trini invented hiphop. I nearly smacked my monitor.


They're not to be taken seriously.
no one said that, Socapro showed an extempo type sound and said maybe the first hip hop song.

Opti u know nothing about Caribbean culture
 
taken from Jamaica observer, this is Jamaicans commenting on this eh


UNSUNG: Rocksteady with Lynn Taitt - Entertainment - JamaicaObserver.com

Entertainment
UNSUNG: Rocksteady with Lynn Taitt

Friday, February 17, 2012

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In commemoration of Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of Independence from Britain, the Jamaica Observer’s Entertainment section recognises 50 persons who have made significant, yet unheralded contributions to the country’s culture. Today, we feature the fourth in the series, musician Lynn Taitt.

OF the many musicians who roamed Kingston’s studios during the 1960s, few can compare to guitarist Lynn Taitt as far as number of hit songs played.

TAITT... recorded for the top Jamaican producers of the 1960s
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Some musicologists claim the Trinidadian is responsible for creating the rocksteady beat which preceded ska. Taitt played with several bands and recorded for the top Jamaican producers of the 1960s.


One of his standout sessions came in 1965. It took place at Federal Records where he was backing singer Hopeton Lewis, on what turned out to be an historic record.

“When I went to Jamaica and started playing with Baba Brooks and those guys everything was fast, but in Trinidad they had fast calypso and slow calypso,” Taitt said in a 2003 interview with the Observer.

“So that day I told ‘Gladdy (keyboardist Gladstone Anderson) to slow the tempo and that’s how Take It Easy and rocksteady came about.”

Taitt, who was born Nerlynn Taitt in the San Fernando region of Trinidad & Tobago, came to Jamaica in 1962 with his band to celebrate Jamaica’s Independence from Britain.

He stayed for 10 years, playing on countless hit songs for producers Vincent ‘Randy’ Chin, Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd, Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid, Leslie Kong and Derrick Harriott.

Some of his best work was done with Kong’s star performer, singer Desmond Dekker. Taitt’s distinctive rhythm riffs can be heard on Israelites and 007 (Shantytown) which were massive hits for Dekker in Britain.

Other classics Taitt played on include: Chang Kai Shek (the Baba Brooks Band), Confucius and Guns of Navarone (the Skatalites), Girl I’ve Got a Date (Alton Ellis), I Can See Clearly Now (Johnny Nash), You Have Caught Me (the Melodians), and Stop That Train (Keith and Tex).

Taitt was founder and leader of The Jets, an all-star band that also included Anderson, saxophonist Headley Bennett, organist Winston Wright and bass player Brian Atkinson. He migrated to Toronto, Canada in 1968, later settling in Montreal.

Lynn Taitt died from cancer in Montreal in January, 2010. He was 75 years old.

Read more: UNSUNG: Rocksteady with Lynn Taitt - Entertainment - JamaicaObserver.com
 
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from Jamaica gleaner

Jamaica Gleaner News - Rocksteady pioneer Nerlin Taitt dead - Entertainment - Saturday | January 23, 2010


Rocksteady pioneer Nerlin Taitt dead

Published: Saturday | January 23, 2010

Howard Campbell, Gleaner Writer


Taitt

Nerlin 'Lynn' Taitt, the Trinidadian guitarist many musicologists credit with the birth of rocksteady, has died. The WACK 90.1 radio station in Trinidad reported on its website that he passed away at age 75 on Wednesday in Montreal, Canada.

No cause of death was given.

Taitt, who was born in Trinidad's San Fernando region, emigrated to Canada in 1968. He first came to Jamaica in August 1963 as a musician to play in celebrations to mark Jamaica's first year of Independence from Britain.

He became a regular session player in Jamaica during the ska era, recording with the genre's biggest acts including The Skatalites and Derrick Morgan.

But it was the rocksteady sound that Taitt is most associated. He perfected that beat by playing in influential bands such as The Cavaliers, Comets and The Jets, which was the most prolific.

His bandmates in The Jets included guitarist Lynford 'Hux' Brown, keyboardists Gladstone Anderson and Winston Wright and saxophonist Headley Bennett.

Among the many hits Taitt played on was Take It Easy by Hopeton Lewis, which many argue is the first rocksteady song. He also worked on Girl I've Got a Date by Alton Ellis.

musicians

Taitt recorded with Jamaica's biggest producers of the 1960s, including arch-rivals Clement 'Coxsone' Dodd and Arthur 'Duke' Reid, Bunny Lee, Sonia Pottinger and Leslie Kong.

Some of Taitt's most appreciated work was done with Kong, a Chinese-Jamaican who was the first person to record Bob Marley. Taitt played on most hit songs by singer Desmond Dekker, Kong's star act.

His jangly opening riffs helped make Dekker's 007 (Shantytown) a classic.

Taitt also recorded several songs with African-American impresario Danny Sims and singer Johnny Nash.

In the 1970s, Taitt was part of a colony of rocksteady musicians living in Toronto. Others included Leroy Sibbles of The Heptones, and keyboardist Jackie Mittoo who Taitt worked with in The Skatalites.
 
Revisit Rocksteady, the beat synonymous with Lynn Taitt - Entertainment - JamaicaObserver.com

Revisit Rocksteady, the beat synonymous with Lynn Taitt

Yesterday's Notes

By Basil Walters Observer staff reporter

Sunday, January 24, 2010

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Sources differ on his age, or the actual date of his birth; there are also variations of the spelling of his name. But one thing constant notion is that even if he did not single-handedly invent the rocksteady beat, Lynn Taitt is the most influential architect of the genre often identified as the golden era of Jamaican music. What remains unchallenged is that the name Lynn Taitt is synonymous with rocksteady music, the precursor to reggae that was most popular between the mid-to-late-1960s.

Attesting to this is no lesser authority than bandleader/trombonist/music teacher extraordinaire, Carlos Malcolm. "Although he played on many Skatalites' recordings during the ska era, in my estimation, Lynn Taitt ushered in the rocksteady era. Taitt was the father of the 'guitar licks' in the rocksteady guitar accompaniment: the bullet-like 'ping' glissando and the doubling of the bassline on guitar all came from Taitt. Although not a trained musician, he had a keen ear and an inventive mind and was a good arranger," the founder/leader of the Carlos Malcolm and the Afro Jamaican Rhythms told Yesterday's Notes.

Lynn Taitt: synonymous with rocksteady music
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Added he: "Lynn Taitt was an intelligent, unobtrusive rhythm guitarist. He had musical discipline which aided and abetted towards the success of a (musical) piece. He probably acquired this trait from playing steel pans in large steel bands in Trinidad. Byron Lee brought Lynn to Jamaica for a gig and Lynn stayed on and formed his own band called the Comets. But his efficient guitar was always for hire."

The successor to ska, the rocksteady beat branded the dance craze of that generation captured by Alton Ellis' classic of the same name. Hence the singer's singer who died a year ago was dubbed the King of Rocksteady.

Notwithstanding, there was a slew of other eminent vocalists with whom he shared the domain. These include Ken "Mr Rocksteady" Boothe, Hopeton Lewis, John Holt and the Paragons, B B Seaton and the Gaylads, Bob Andy, Delroy Wilson, Leroy Sibbles and the Heptones, Roy Shirley, Slim Smith, Pat Kelly, the Techniques, the Melodians and Phyllis Dillon. The list is endless.

One of the several factors that have contributed to the evolution of rocksteady into reggae at the dawn of the 1970s was the emigration to Canada by some of rocksteady's architects, mainly Lynn Taitt and Jackie Mittoo. Other developments include the upgrading of Jamaican recording studio technology, during which time there was a transformation of the bass pattern.

The guitar virtuoso, born Nerlynn Taitt in Trinidad between 1934 to 1940, died last Wednesday in Montreal, Canada (not Toronto, as was reported in Friday's Observer) after a long battle with cancer.

The rocksteady rhythm is his legacy.


Read more: Revisit Rocksteady, the beat synonymous with Lynn Taitt - Entertainment - JamaicaObserver.com
 

La reina Baby Phat

Registered User
Revisit Rocksteady, the beat synonymous with Lynn Taitt - Entertainment - JamaicaObserver.com

Revisit Rocksteady, the beat synonymous with Lynn Taitt

Yesterday's Notes

By Basil Walters Observer staff reporter

Sunday, January 24, 2010

Print this page Email A Friend!

Sources differ on his age, or the actual date of his birth; there are also variations of the spelling of his name. But one thing constant notion is that even if he did not single-handedly invent the rocksteady beat, Lynn Taitt is the most influential architect of the genre often identified as the golden era of Jamaican music. What remains unchallenged is that the name Lynn Taitt is synonymous with rocksteady music, the precursor to reggae that was most popular between the mid-to-late-1960s.

Attesting to this is no lesser authority than bandleader/trombonist/music teacher extraordinaire, Carlos Malcolm. "Although he played on many Skatalites' recordings during the ska era, in my estimation, Lynn Taitt ushered in the rocksteady era. Taitt was the father of the 'guitar licks' in the rocksteady guitar accompaniment: the bullet-like 'ping' glissando and the doubling of the bassline on guitar all came from Taitt. Although not a trained musician, he had a keen ear and an inventive mind and was a good arranger," the founder/leader of the Carlos Malcolm and the Afro Jamaican Rhythms told Yesterday's Notes.

Lynn Taitt: synonymous with rocksteady music
[Hide Description] Lynn Taitt: synonymous with rocksteady music
[Restore Description]
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Added he: "Lynn Taitt was an intelligent, unobtrusive rhythm guitarist. He had musical discipline which aided and abetted towards the success of a (musical) piece. He probably acquired this trait from playing steel pans in large steel bands in Trinidad. Byron Lee brought Lynn to Jamaica for a gig and Lynn stayed on and formed his own band called the Comets. But his efficient guitar was always for hire."

The successor to ska, the rocksteady beat branded the dance craze of that generation captured by Alton Ellis' classic of the same name. Hence the singer's singer who died a year ago was dubbed the King of Rocksteady.

Notwithstanding, there was a slew of other eminent vocalists with whom he shared the domain. These include Ken "Mr Rocksteady" Boothe, Hopeton Lewis, John Holt and the Paragons, B B Seaton and the Gaylads, Bob Andy, Delroy Wilson, Leroy Sibbles and the Heptones, Roy Shirley, Slim Smith, Pat Kelly, the Techniques, the Melodians and Phyllis Dillon. The list is endless.

One of the several factors that have contributed to the evolution of rocksteady into reggae at the dawn of the 1970s was the emigration to Canada by some of rocksteady's architects, mainly Lynn Taitt and Jackie Mittoo. Other developments include the upgrading of Jamaican recording studio technology, during which time there was a transformation of the bass pattern.

The guitar virtuoso, born Nerlynn Taitt in Trinidad between 1934 to 1940, died last Wednesday in Montreal, Canada (not Toronto, as was reported in Friday's Observer) after a long battle with cancer.

The rocksteady rhythm is his legacy.


Read more: Revisit Rocksteady, the beat synonymous with Lynn Taitt - Entertainment - JamaicaObserver.com

Was wondering when someone was gonna bring up Jackie Mittoo.

....I dunno why ppl feel like fi dem music was created in a vacuum with no outside influences any at all. I dunno why ppl seem to completely ignore the amount of travelling between islands that was happening post emancipation/pre-independence (and before and after these areas) by Caribbean persons whether it be for work, school etc. If people just acknowledged how interconnected the Caribbean has been and still is (regardless of language, culture etc) cuz of these and other factors, about 70% of the debates on this site would be over in one page.
 
Was wondering when someone was gonna bring up Jackie Mittoo.

....I dunno why ppl feel like fi dem music was created in a vacuum with no outside influences any at all. I dunno why ppl seem to completely ignore the amount of travelling between islands that was happening post emancipation/pre-independence (and before and after these areas) by Caribbean persons whether it be for work, school etc. If people just acknowledged how interconnected the Caribbean has been and still is (regardless of language, culture etc) cuz of these and other factors, about 70% of the debates on this site would be over in one page.
You raised some really good points.

I think this should be directed mainly to Trinis and Jamaicans, other islanders are not as insular, at least I dont think so.
 

Namey Namey

Registered User
dumbass Namey, when Taitt went to Jamaica, Soca was not in existence, you know nothing about music so shut up.
Soca, steel pan, I really dont care you moron. He went to jamaica an buk up pon some real genius, and decided that's where he wanted be. He may have contributed, but the foundation was already set by jamaicans. you the one complaining that he got recognition, then posted a jamaican news article giving him props.

Clown
 
N

NaturalBornRidah

Guest
Was wondering when someone was gonna bring up Jackie Mittoo.

....I dunno why ppl feel like fi dem music was created in a vacuum with no outside influences any at all. I dunno why ppl seem to completely ignore the amount of travelling between islands that was happening post emancipation/pre-independence (and before and after these areas) by Caribbean persons whether it be for work, school etc. If people just acknowledged how interconnected the Caribbean has been and still is (regardless of language, culture etc) cuz of these and other factors, about 70% of the debates on this site would be over in one page.
Yea but when you mention that first soca artist being Might Sparrow who is from Grenada, and hearing how Grendans, Dominicans, and other islanders were instrumental in bringing Soca about you would her a lot of antagonist and nay sayers.
 
Yea but when you mention that first soca artist being Might Sparrow who is from Grenada, and hearing how Grendans, Dominicans, and other islanders were instrumental in bringing Soca about you would her a lot of antagonist and nay sayers.
just to show u are a dumbass, the "first" Soca artists is not Sparrow, u know nothing about Soca..epic fail, stay in u lane.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
no one said that, Socapro showed an extempo type sound and said maybe the first hip hop song.

Opti u know nothing about Caribbean culture
I think Opti may have been refering to this post:

Was this man Lancelot Lane the first ever rapper?

This is from 1960's, listen to this and feel the power of the chantuelle!

Lancelot Lane - Yo Tink It Sorf
<iframe width="640" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/EDrRjAKoGCE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


I have a strong suspicion that this man was the world's first rapper but hasn’t been given his due credit because he is a non-American! :bad:
If that's the case then Opti is slow if he eh realise that I only asked a question but was ultimately on a bit of kicks as part of a promotional gimmick as I was just about to start a "Rapso Thread" in Soca Chat section at the time which I have since started. http://www.islandmix.com/backchat/f16/rapso-thread-248899/
 
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Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Not you, Socapro.


Ananci made a claim a while ago about a Trinidadian being the first rapper.
That argument is not totally without substance though (but more the children of a Trinidadian) as I have heard strong arguments that the children of one of the old-time calypso greats called Houdini (a calypsonian who used to practice singing extempo war calypsos regularly at his home and then at shows in New York), tried to copy what their calypso father from Trinidad was doing but were doing so in an American accent as they were born and raised in America and so ending up doing what sounded much like the first rap songs when they were heard practicing their craft on the streets of New York and then at the gigs/parties in New York where they performed.

Apparently they also called themselves after their father's calypso name Houdini.
I think this was like somewhere during the 50's/60's when they started out as one of the first ever rap groups in New York.

See this link on Houdini the calypsonian to see how big he was and why he had to do a lot of extempo war calypsos as he was regularly under attack from the Trini based calypsonians who regularly came to America to perform and had to be prepared to defend himself: Wilmoth Houdini - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I have not however done enough research into this topic as I am not really a big hip-hop/rap fan. Maybe I'll do some checking up to verify if this argument holds any water but will need to hear some of the Houdini rap group early recordings and note what year they did them before I can dismiss that argument entirely.

Apparently they were trying to sing extempo style like their father and loved warring in song just like he did but did so in their American accents as they were born there.

Here is an example of a typical Calypso Extempo War that was done regularly in the old days and remember that some of these wars were done at big calypso concerts in America in the 30's, 40's and 50's that other Americans youngsters (not just Houdini's children) may have also been exposed to as well.

Calypso War - Lord Invader, Macbeth the Great & Duke of Iron:
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As you can hear warring in song was done in Trinidad Calypso many moons before it was ever done in Jamaican reggae or in American rap.

And here is Houdini declaring war on his fellow calypsonians back in Trinidad.

Wilmoth Houdini - War Declaration
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Georgeflash

Who feels it knows it!
You all still at this?

Swagga wasn't it the case that Hopeton Lewis was having a hard time singing the song "Take it easy" at the Ska pace. Taitt who was in the session suggested to slow it down a bit to help out poor Hopeton. The follow up adaptation of the slower tempo and reduction in horns in preference for guitar rifts was done at Federal by a combination of musicians. Taitt was a part of the house band at the time and so was on most of the Rocksteady songs at the time.

You have to remember that rocksteady was only around for short time before Reggae was born. The difference between ska and Rocksteady was incremental. Reggae brought about major fundamental change.
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
Yea but when you mention that first soca artist being Might Sparrow who is from Grenada, and hearing how Grendans, Dominicans, and other islanders were instrumental in bringing Soca about you would her a lot of antagonist and nay sayers.
BWAHaHahaHaha!!! Aye! Well yes!!! Now i've heard it all on islandmix.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
You all still at this?

Swagga wasn't it the case that Hopeton Lewis was having a hard time singing the song "Take it easy" at the Ska pace. Taitt who was in the session suggested to slow it down a bit to help out poor Hopeton. The follow up adaptation of the slower tempo and reduction in horns in preference for guitar rifts was done at Federal by a combination of musicians. Taitt was a part of the house band at the time and so was on most of the Rocksteady songs at the time.

You have to remember that rocksteady was only around for short time before Reggae was born. The difference between ska and Rocksteady was incremental. Reggae brought about major fundamental change.
Good post but that does not take away from Taitt being one the main men behind the birth of rock steady and as rock steady is the crucial link between the transition from ska to reggae we cannot dismiss the importance of Taitt's contribution in helping to bring about that transition.

Respect to the man as he deserves to be inducted into the Jamaican Music Hall of Fame.
 

Ananci_7

Registered User
GF, mind you. This guy said a while ago a Trini invented hiphop. I nearly smacked my monitor.


They're not to be taken seriously.
Oh please, quote me, find where I said he invented rap/hip-hop. Go on, find it.

Cause all I recall is posting the link to that same song Soca just put up ("Yuh think it sorf") and I did this to show the Trini influence which is given much less acknowledgement than that of the immortal DJ Kool Herc (and as I recall you couldn't refute the claim then either).

Oh and do note that even before Herc and Layne, there was "rapping" by men like popular bandleader Louis Jordan (go find the song "Caldonia")
 
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