Lynn Taitt - The Trini who created Jamaican Rocksteady

Ananci_7

Registered User
As for you Swaggers,

Yuh see all them article yuh take god out yuh thoughts and put up.......You do realise that it means Opti and Namey and GF will have to actually read it

Pearls to swine
 

pj2577

Registered User
You coconuts are so funny with your territorialism, before 1962 there was no Trinidad and Jamaica, only the Realm, mere subjects of the queen. Cultural cross-pollination was common as a there was free movement between Crown territories.

What's funny to me as an outsider is that most Jamaicans seem to have no qualms about Puerto Ricans jacking their music (Reggaeton), but they get mad insecure about another W. Indian who makes a song in one of their genres. Even though Latinos have their differences, they show more love to each other and musical styles recognize than West Indians--why is this? When I go out a Mexican will dance to Salsa (Cuban) and a Puerto Rican will dance to Merengue (Dominican)...

The man didn't invent it, but he did help to innovate. Remember it's not where you are from it's where you at... I realize this post is pointless because your West Indian tribalism will prevent your from even admitting the man's contributions, but the truth must be told...

All you cats from JA need to stop being insecure in your national identity and give respect where respect is due. I encourgage to you all to do research. If you don't take my word take the word of your countrymen like Bobby Ellis, Prince Buster, Ernest Ranglin, Tony Chin, et al. See the excerpts from interviews with them and others below:

Bobby Ellis, 2005:

B: Two man me know have perfect pitch ears – Jackie Mittoo, and Lyn Taitt.

KB: So did you do a good amount of work with Lynn Taitt too?

B: Yeah. Yeah.

KB: Because he played more at Treasure Isle, right?…

B: No man!

KB: …more than at Coxsone…

B: …right round… no man! Right round. Anybody. Yes, him play more at Treasure Isle than Coxsone. But he was the guy that do the most at one time. I think he should have gotten honor, although he’s not a Jamaican, for our music. Yeah man. He did a lot to our music. Excellent guy, man.

KB: Yeah.

B: He should [have won Jamaican honors]. Two man — right? –two man wid de perfect pitch ears,and they should have got honor, and none of dem get it.”

Hux Brown, 2005:

“KB:A lot of people credit you with – when you say “lead guitar” – for starting this kind of bubbling on the…

H: No, I didn’t start that. I learned that from Lynn Taitt. When I used to play with Lynn Taitt, Lynn Taitt used to do that. Lynn Taitt used to go, like, ‘br-r-r’… and that… you know, just a little…But I kind of add a little more to it. But I learn that from Lynn Taitt.

KB: It’s great to hear you give credit…

H: Everything that I learned playing… guitar like that… is from Lynn Taitt. And I will never tell a lie. I play with Lynn Taitt for about a year and a half, and I learned everything from Lynn Taitt. He’s my best friend right now. I call him right now, he’d tell you the same thing. Wid both of us, still cool.”

Bagga Walker, 2005: “All of those song, Lynn Taitt used to play all of those nice songs. Dem days it was Lynn Taitt. Lynn Taitt is not a Jamaican, you know. Dem man deh was de first man, as I tell you. So you have man was the first, [then] we come after, like a decade. Even King David good fe learn it from somebody before him [who] learn fe make a guitar or a harp.”

Fully Fulwood, 2006: “Lynn is one of the great, great rocksteady player. Lynn Taitt is from Trinidad. And he came. Him didn’t spend that long. But he is the one that responsible for how rocksteady become so popular—Lynn Taitt. He was one of my idol.”

Derrick Harriott, 2004: “I today will tell you that Lynn Taitt is one of the greatest exponents of the rocksteady. I rate that man as number one in terms of the rocksteady beat. Oh, Lynn Taitt is great. Listen, I did a song and didn’t like it. And I seh, ‘bwai, go come back in the studio, and bring Lynn Taitt.’ That was a song called ‘Walk the Streets at Night,’ which went to number one. Well, I’m telling you, it became a hit—number one. That’s why I say, music is a sound—especially Jamaican music—you have to get a sound. And when you not pleased about that sound, and you go back to get that sound, it is a great thing. From he [Taitt] started the guitar — ‘blang, blang, blang-blang-blang-blang, blang’—and I started singing, and he playing something in the background—I tell you! Even ‘Solomon Was the Wise Man,’ wah I did, he worked out the background…

KB: But, interesting that somebody who played such a big role in forming rocksteady, forming this Jamaican music, is Trinidadian too.

Yes! Yes, true. But he was here grooving in with the different bands, you know. He even had a band called Lynn Taitt and the Comets. I’ll tell you something: most of Duke Reid Treasure Isle label big hits, Lynn Taitt played on them. A lot of Studio One stuff, Lynn Taitt played on it. Not that much, but quite a few. All the independent producers—Phil Pratt, Bunny Lee, Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry, and myself—he played on so much hits.”

Ranny “Bop” Williams, 1999: “There is a guitarist by the name of Lynn Taitt. He dominated the rocksteady. When Lynn Taitt was leaving Jamaica, I purchased his instrument off him.”

Cedric Brooks, 2003: “When Lynn Taitt came, we played around a bit [in the same band]. He started accompanying Jackie Opel, and people like those, some of the Trinidad singers, and some of the other singers. And he got into the recording business. So he kind of came in as a solo person. He would come in bands. And then we played together in one of the groups called Sheiks.

KB: At that time was there much of a distinction between [Jamaican musicians and] musicians who came from elsewhere to Jamaica?

Yes and no. I mean, once they were good, you know… if they were good, people just loved them. And, you know, that was the kind of attitude. And he [Taitt] was able to get right into the Jamaican style of doing things. And people loved him for that.”

Leonard Dillon, 2005:

“KB: So why it get so creative, and so much experimentation in the late 60s?—mid to late 60s?

If you had those kind of musician, if those musician was around today—blessed! Roland Alphonso, Tommy McCook, Jah Jerry. Name them, man. Name them, all those great musician of time, that used to create their music. Lynn Taitt.

KB: Did Lynn Taitt ever play on sessions with you?

Yeah. A lot. I used to be vocal for the band Lynn Taitt and the Jets—I and Joe Higgs. That is one of the reasons why I used to have so many hit songs. (laughs slightly) Becau the band that I sing with, the band which I’m a vocalist for, is the band that make the most hit song with artists—the Jets.”

Headley Bennett, 2005: “Lynn Taitt, Hopeton Lewis—those are de guy dat really create rocksteady, you know. I’m telling you. I was there! I’m not saying that other guys don’t have dem opinion, and write some opinion. I’m not saying that they are wrong. I’m only telling you what I know.”

Alva Lewis, 2005: “Me and Lynn Taitt mix up, man.

KB: So you play a lot of sessions with Lynn Taitt?

Almighty God help me! Lynn Taitt?! Oh God, man!”

Colin Leslie, 2005: “[Lynn Taitt], he’s from Trinidad. People don’t know that he’s still around. The whole Jamaica used to respect him, you know.”

Brent Dowe, 2005: “Lynn Taitt a [is] de creator of it. Is him create the rocksteady beat. Is him slow it down. It was ska. Lynn Taitt come as a Trinidadian and get to love the music, and him see it in a different way, and slow it down. Is him do ‘Girl I’ve Got a Date,’ you know—the first tune wah pull right down, come off a de ska and put it down. Yeah. At Duke Reid. Lynn Taitt and Jackie Jackson, and [Hugh] Malcolm on drum. And Winston Wright, and Gladstone Anderson. They are the ones who change the music. They are the ones, sah.”

Prince Buster, 2005: “ Lynn Taitt… you see? The man is never given credit. The man who formed the rocksteady is never given credit—Lynn Taitt. Guitarist, Lynn Taitt. You understand? And, bwai, me a tell you, something hurt me too. Becau dat’s de man who turn it round now! And you hear dis [i.e., another musician] a talk bout him [is the one who created rocksteady]. (Says with contempt in his voice): Where dem come from, dem Johnny-come-lately shit?! A [it is] Lynn Taitt! And me and Lynn Taitt go out pon a rocksteady, lick pon dem.”

Tony Chin, 2007: “Actually, Lynn Taitt is one of my biggest inspiration.”

Ernest Ranglin, 2005: “Lynn Taitt was quite flexible. There weren’t much people who were arrangers, so to speak. Lynn Taitt was one.”

Wesley Nelson [of the Overtakers, and the Mellotones], 2005: “Lynn Taitt was one of my favorites. Fe real. Him was one of the main man, because that man, him mek de guitar talk, and say anyting him want to say.”

Mikey Chung, 2005: “One of my main influences up to now is Lynn Taitt. And he’s the father. I mean, Ernie Ranglin too. But Ernie Ranglin didn’t innovate as much as Lynn Taitt. They said Lynn Taitt—I don’t know if you hear it—Lynn Taitt was a steel pan player. Yeah, and when he came to Jamaica, he said he was emulating the steel pan with his guitar. But, I mean, his styling, up to now, I take it.

Count Owen, 1999: “Incidentally, Lynn Taitt played on my rocksteady album… The rocksteady is a completely different rhythm [from mento and calypso], which was created by some outstanding Jamaican musicians at the time. I could call name like Lynn Taitt. Incidentally, Lynn Taitt was from Trinidad. But he came here, and he lived for some time. And he did a great job with the rocksteady. In fact, you know, he was the backbone of the rocksteady… Lynn Taitt was the main man.”
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Mikey Chung, 2005: “One of my main influences up to now is Lynn Taitt. And he’s the father. I mean, Ernie Ranglin too. But Ernie Ranglin didn’t innovate as much as Lynn Taitt. They said Lynn Taitt—I don’t know if you hear it—Lynn Taitt was a steel pan player. Yeah, and when he came to Jamaica, he said he was emulating the steel pan with his guitar. But, I mean, his styling, up to now, I take it.

Count Owen, 1999: “Incidentally, Lynn Taitt played on my rocksteady album… The rocksteady is a completely different rhythm [from mento and calypso], which was created by some outstanding Jamaican musicians at the time. I could call name like Lynn Taitt. Incidentally, Lynn Taitt was from Trinidad. But he came here, and he lived for some time. And he did a great job with the rocksteady. In fact, you know, he was the backbone of the rocksteady… Lynn Taitt was the main man
It's interesting that Lynn Taitt's distinctive guitar licks were inspired by him trying to emulate the strumming sound of the guitar pan in a steelband and yet many Jamaicans who love rocksteady and reggae tend not to love the steelband.
Interesting indeed! :beach:
 

Ananci_7

Registered User
You coconuts are so funny with your territorialism, before 1962 there was no Trinidad and Jamaica, only the Realm, mere subjects of the queen. Cultural cross-pollination was common as a there was free movement between Crown territories.

What's funny to me as an outsider is that most Jamaicans seem to have no qualms about Puerto Ricans jacking their music (Reggaeton), but they get mad insecure about another W. Indian who makes a song in one of their genres. Even though Latinos have their differences, they show more love to each other and musical styles recognize than West Indians--why is this? When I go out a Mexican will dance to Salsa (Cuban) and a Puerto Rican will dance to Merengue (Dominican)...

The man didn't invent it, but he did help to innovate. Remember it's not where you are from it's where you at... I realize this post is pointless because your West Indian tribalism will prevent your from even admitting the man's contributions, but the truth must be told...

All you cats from JA need to stop being insecure in your national identity and give respect where respect is due. I encourgage to you all to do research. If you don't take my word take the word of your countrymen like Bobby Ellis, Prince Buster, Ernest Ranglin, Tony Chin, et al. See the excerpts from interviews with them and others below:

Bobby Ellis, 2005:

B: Two man me know have perfect pitch ears – Jackie Mittoo, and Lyn Taitt.

KB: So did you do a good amount of work with Lynn Taitt too?

B: Yeah. Yeah.

KB: Because he played more at Treasure Isle, right?…

B: No man!

KB: …more than at Coxsone…

B: …right round… no man! Right round. Anybody. Yes, him play more at Treasure Isle than Coxsone. But he was the guy that do the most at one time. I think he should have gotten honor, although he’s not a Jamaican, for our music. Yeah man. He did a lot to our music. Excellent guy, man.

KB: Yeah.

B: He should [have won Jamaican honors]. Two man — right? –two man wid de perfect pitch ears,and they should have got honor, and none of dem get it.”

Hux Brown, 2005:

“KB:A lot of people credit you with – when you say “lead guitar” – for starting this kind of bubbling on the…

H: No, I didn’t start that. I learned that from Lynn Taitt. When I used to play with Lynn Taitt, Lynn Taitt used to do that. Lynn Taitt used to go, like, ‘br-r-r’… and that… you know, just a little…But I kind of add a little more to it. But I learn that from Lynn Taitt.

KB: It’s great to hear you give credit…

H: Everything that I learned playing… guitar like that… is from Lynn Taitt. And I will never tell a lie. I play with Lynn Taitt for about a year and a half, and I learned everything from Lynn Taitt. He’s my best friend right now. I call him right now, he’d tell you the same thing. Wid both of us, still cool.”

Bagga Walker, 2005: “All of those song, Lynn Taitt used to play all of those nice songs. Dem days it was Lynn Taitt. Lynn Taitt is not a Jamaican, you know. Dem man deh was de first man, as I tell you. So you have man was the first, [then] we come after, like a decade. Even King David good fe learn it from somebody before him [who] learn fe make a guitar or a harp.”

Fully Fulwood, 2006: “Lynn is one of the great, great rocksteady player. Lynn Taitt is from Trinidad. And he came. Him didn’t spend that long. But he is the one that responsible for how rocksteady become so popular—Lynn Taitt. He was one of my idol.”

Derrick Harriott, 2004: “I today will tell you that Lynn Taitt is one of the greatest exponents of the rocksteady. I rate that man as number one in terms of the rocksteady beat. Oh, Lynn Taitt is great. Listen, I did a song and didn’t like it. And I seh, ‘bwai, go come back in the studio, and bring Lynn Taitt.’ That was a song called ‘Walk the Streets at Night,’ which went to number one. Well, I’m telling you, it became a hit—number one. That’s why I say, music is a sound—especially Jamaican music—you have to get a sound. And when you not pleased about that sound, and you go back to get that sound, it is a great thing. From he [Taitt] started the guitar — ‘blang, blang, blang-blang-blang-blang, blang’—and I started singing, and he playing something in the background—I tell you! Even ‘Solomon Was the Wise Man,’ wah I did, he worked out the background…

KB: But, interesting that somebody who played such a big role in forming rocksteady, forming this Jamaican music, is Trinidadian too.

Yes! Yes, true. But he was here grooving in with the different bands, you know. He even had a band called Lynn Taitt and the Comets. I’ll tell you something: most of Duke Reid Treasure Isle label big hits, Lynn Taitt played on them. A lot of Studio One stuff, Lynn Taitt played on it. Not that much, but quite a few. All the independent producers—Phil Pratt, Bunny Lee, Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry, and myself—he played on so much hits.”

Ranny “Bop” Williams, 1999: “There is a guitarist by the name of Lynn Taitt. He dominated the rocksteady. When Lynn Taitt was leaving Jamaica, I purchased his instrument off him.”

Cedric Brooks, 2003: “When Lynn Taitt came, we played around a bit [in the same band]. He started accompanying Jackie Opel, and people like those, some of the Trinidad singers, and some of the other singers. And he got into the recording business. So he kind of came in as a solo person. He would come in bands. And then we played together in one of the groups called Sheiks.

KB: At that time was there much of a distinction between [Jamaican musicians and] musicians who came from elsewhere to Jamaica?

Yes and no. I mean, once they were good, you know… if they were good, people just loved them. And, you know, that was the kind of attitude. And he [Taitt] was able to get right into the Jamaican style of doing things. And people loved him for that.”

Leonard Dillon, 2005:

“KB: So why it get so creative, and so much experimentation in the late 60s?—mid to late 60s?

If you had those kind of musician, if those musician was around today—blessed! Roland Alphonso, Tommy McCook, Jah Jerry. Name them, man. Name them, all those great musician of time, that used to create their music. Lynn Taitt.

KB: Did Lynn Taitt ever play on sessions with you?

Yeah. A lot. I used to be vocal for the band Lynn Taitt and the Jets—I and Joe Higgs. That is one of the reasons why I used to have so many hit songs. (laughs slightly) Becau the band that I sing with, the band which I’m a vocalist for, is the band that make the most hit song with artists—the Jets.”

Headley Bennett, 2005: “Lynn Taitt, Hopeton Lewis—those are de guy dat really create rocksteady, you know. I’m telling you. I was there! I’m not saying that other guys don’t have dem opinion, and write some opinion. I’m not saying that they are wrong. I’m only telling you what I know.”

Alva Lewis, 2005: “Me and Lynn Taitt mix up, man.

KB: So you play a lot of sessions with Lynn Taitt?

Almighty God help me! Lynn Taitt?! Oh God, man!”

Colin Leslie, 2005: “[Lynn Taitt], he’s from Trinidad. People don’t know that he’s still around. The whole Jamaica used to respect him, you know.”

Brent Dowe, 2005: “Lynn Taitt a [is] de creator of it. Is him create the rocksteady beat. Is him slow it down. It was ska. Lynn Taitt come as a Trinidadian and get to love the music, and him see it in a different way, and slow it down. Is him do ‘Girl I’ve Got a Date,’ you know—the first tune wah pull right down, come off a de ska and put it down. Yeah. At Duke Reid. Lynn Taitt and Jackie Jackson, and [Hugh] Malcolm on drum. And Winston Wright, and Gladstone Anderson. They are the ones who change the music. They are the ones, sah.”

Prince Buster, 2005: “ Lynn Taitt… you see? The man is never given credit. The man who formed the rocksteady is never given credit—Lynn Taitt. Guitarist, Lynn Taitt. You understand? And, bwai, me a tell you, something hurt me too. Becau dat’s de man who turn it round now! And you hear dis [i.e., another musician] a talk bout him [is the one who created rocksteady]. (Says with contempt in his voice): Where dem come from, dem Johnny-come-lately shit?! A [it is] Lynn Taitt! And me and Lynn Taitt go out pon a rocksteady, lick pon dem.”

Tony Chin, 2007: “Actually, Lynn Taitt is one of my biggest inspiration.”

Ernest Ranglin, 2005: “Lynn Taitt was quite flexible. There weren’t much people who were arrangers, so to speak. Lynn Taitt was one.”

Wesley Nelson [of the Overtakers, and the Mellotones], 2005: “Lynn Taitt was one of my favorites. Fe real. Him was one of the main man, because that man, him mek de guitar talk, and say anyting him want to say.”

Mikey Chung, 2005: “One of my main influences up to now is Lynn Taitt. And he’s the father. I mean, Ernie Ranglin too. But Ernie Ranglin didn’t innovate as much as Lynn Taitt. They said Lynn Taitt—I don’t know if you hear it—Lynn Taitt was a steel pan player. Yeah, and when he came to Jamaica, he said he was emulating the steel pan with his guitar. But, I mean, his styling, up to now, I take it.

Count Owen, 1999: “Incidentally, Lynn Taitt played on my rocksteady album… The rocksteady is a completely different rhythm [from mento and calypso], which was created by some outstanding Jamaican musicians at the time. I could call name like Lynn Taitt. Incidentally, Lynn Taitt was from Trinidad. But he came here, and he lived for some time. And he did a great job with the rocksteady. In fact, you know, he was the backbone of the rocksteady… Lynn Taitt was the main man.”
So very true
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
It's interesting that Lynn Taitt's distinctive guitar licks were inspired by him trying to emulate the strumming sound of the guitar pan in a steelband and yet many Jamaicans who love rocksteady and reggae tend not to love the steelband.
Interesting indeed! :beach:
Pro the music is so closely connected that once cannot be surprised that a trini that was that deeply involved in the genesis of this genre. I mean i listen to the guitar strumming of some of the old calypsos and you can hear the extreme similarity to rock steady.

Great Post PJ2577
 

dedetriniking

Registered User

Let the truth be told oui. Here's the signature song in jamaica for the big referandum vote in Jamaican that eventually ended in them pulling out of the federation. The singer is a trini calypsonian named Lord Laro.


<iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rCXCYhL89Dw?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


The truth is that before Reggae became the monster that it now is, calypso (mento) was the order on the day in jamaica...that is the foundation of jamaican music.
 

Jason kiDD

Super Moderator
So let me see if I can understand the overall scheme of the post. As an Italian born in Italy if I go to Trinidad and help produce some soca music there then that means that the whole of Italy made soca!?

I just want to see if I got it all down?! :read:
 
So let me see if I can understand the overall scheme of the post. As an Italian born in Italy if I go to Trinidad and help produce some soca music there then that means that the whole of Italy made soca!?

I just want to see if I got it all down?! :read:
no but this is in keeping with Imix's culture of a whole nation taking credit for this and that

thats why it always have so much bakannal in Soca chat, because a whole nation always wanna take credit for the work of a man

its not like that in the US
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
So let me see if I can understand the overall scheme of the post. As an Italian born in Italy if I go to Trinidad and help produce some soca music there then that means that the whole of Italy made soca!?

I just want to see if I got it all down?! :read:
Because a Trini was one of the main players who contributed to the development of rocksteady does not mean that rocksteady was a Trinidadian invention as it was created in Jamaica in a Jamaican environment and not in Trinidad so don't get it twisted.

See post #107 above for testimonies by renowned Jamaicans in the business about how important Lynn Taitt was to the development of rocksteady. Those are not Trinidadians talking in those interviews/quotes, they are just honest Jamaicans who know the facts first hand.
 

Seawall

Registered User

Let the truth be told oui. Here's the signature song in jamaica for the big referandum vote in Jamaican that eventually ended in them pulling out of the federation. The singer is a trini calypsonian named Lord Laro.


<iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rCXCYhL89Dw?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


The truth is that before Reggae became the monster that it now is, calypso (mento) was the order on the day in jamaica...that is the foundation of jamaican music.
Everyone knows this. The issue is whether mento has Jamaican roots or was borrowed from calypso (as was claimed). Mento is Jamaican indigenous music that has a strong Cuban (more cuban than calypso) influence and later came under the influence of calypso. Its roots are Jamaican. And ska also has jazz, r&b, and Cuban influences. The Americans can claim that reggae developed out of New Orleans r&b and they would be correct. Similarily, The Dominicans can also claim that cadence-lypso was a vital influence on the development of soca. But, Trinis don't like to hear this. They influence everyone's ting, but no non Trinis played a part in the evolution of their ting.
 

Inquistive

New member

Let the truth be told oui. Here's the signature song in jamaica for the big referandum vote in Jamaican that eventually ended in them pulling out of the federation. The singer is a trini calypsonian named Lord Laro.


<iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rCXCYhL89Dw?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


The truth is that before Reggae became the monster that it now is, calypso (mento) was the order on the day in jamaica...that is the foundation of jamaican music.

Calypso and Mento are not the same. Two totally different forms of music.
 

Seawall

Registered User
Because a Trini was one of the main players who contributed to the development of rocksteady does not mean that rocksteady was a Trinidadian invention as it was created in Jamaica in a Jamaican environment and not in Trinidad so don't get it twisted.

See post #107 above for testimonies by renowned Jamaicans in the business about how important Lynn Taitt was to the development of rocksteady. Those are not Trinidadians talking in those interviews/quotes, they are just honest Jamaicans who know the facts first hand.
Jamaicans are very gracious when it comes to giving credit. They also credit the Americans profusely for their influence on ska, rock steady, and reggae. Some can learn from their graciousness. All Caribbean, and African diasporean, genres borrowed (and still do) from each other.
 
Jamaicans are very gracious when it comes to giving credit. They also credit the Americans profusely for their influence on ska, rock steady, and reggae. Some can learn from their graciousness. All Caribbean, and African diasporean, genres borrowed (and still do) from each other.
i think as a Guyanese you have little rights to talk about music

your country did not do much in that field, so fall back
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
i think as a Guyanese you have little rights to talk about music

your country did not do much in that field, so fall back
Don't be so ignorant Swaggerific.

The Guyanese have always been contributing in the background from way back, even you should know and acknowledge that.

Plus Eddy Grant has singlehandedly made a major contribution to promoting Caribbean and Soca music on his distribution Ice Records label.

You must learn to give Jack his jacket and the Guyanese have contributed as much as anyone else to the health of the Caribbean music scene even if they have slacked off a lot in recent years.
 
Don't be so ignorant Swaggerific.

The Guyanese have always been contributing in the background from way back, even you should know and acknowledge that.

Plus Eddy Grant has singlehandedly made a major contribution to promoting Caribbean and Soca music on his distribution Ice Records label.

You must learn to give Jack his jacket and the Guyanese have contributed as much as anyone else to the health of the Caribbean music scene even if they have slacked off a lot in recent years.
i not giving he no props, Eddy Grant is one man

what kinda music scene Guyana have/had? NOTHING NOTHING NOTHING, well besides the Indians

Black Guyanese music is zero to north
 
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