Ma'am

jamaicangirl

Boonoonoonoos
For those who work with clients/customers/patients/diners etc.

Do you refer to women as "Ma'am?' At what age do you begin to use this phrase? What do you call a teenager? Do you call the men "Sir?"
 

Poca

Registered User
I think that it should be used for anyone who looks adult. Better be cautious than unprofessional.
 

Poca

Registered User
I don't know for english speaking folks but, nowadays to say Mademoiselle (Miss) is considered highly impolite and even offending to some. So Madame it is for every women.
 

MÉCHANT LOUP

Cervical Cancer
I don't know for english speaking folks but, nowadays to say Mademoiselle (Miss) is considered highly impolite and even offending to some. So Madame it is for every women.
Mademoiselle is offensive in english, because it's offensive in french.

So, when someone calls you Mademoiselle in english...it's not to be polite.
 

Poca

Registered User
Mademoiselle is used in English too? I always thought that it was the french equivalent of Miss? and Mademoiselle was not always seen as offensive in french. It started to changed because women were marrying less and they 40+ unmarried women would find it offensive to be referred to as a "young unmarried woman". Until a woman gets married she used to be called mademoiselle and with time the mentality about that changed.
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
who is calling people mademoiselle in english?? o_O

anyways... now that i think about it .. i'm not sure yes.. some people address women wearing wedding rings as Mrs.. and everybody else as Ms.
 

triniameri

Hey Ms. Carter...
For those who work with clients/customers/patients/diners etc.

Do you refer to women as "Ma'am?' At what age do you begin to use this phrase? What do you call a teenager? Do you call the men "Sir?"
I was raised to call adults ma'am & sir....in fact in my household if our name was called we never replied with "what?" or "huh" :no2:...it was always "Ma'am?"... "Sir?"

In addition I address females who are older than me with "Ms./ Mrs" ,"Miss" for teenagers/younger women, & "Mr." for males in conjunction with their first name when addressing them
 

mz_JazE

Southern Belle
I was raised to call adults ma'am & sir....in fact in my household if our name was called we never replied with "what?" or "huh" :no2:...it was always "Ma'am?"... "Sir?"

In addition I address females who are older than me with "Ms./ Mrs" ,"Miss" for teenagers/younger women, & "Mr." for males in conjunction with their first name when addressing them
Surprisingly when I talk to the older women who say it's so nice to hear that coming from younger women, and they wish it would happen more. I always refer to them as Ms./Mrs., but I guess that's because it's just something that I saw my mother doing growing up and it rubbed off on me. I see my daughter doing it now, and I correct her when I hear her trying to address any adult by their first name.
 

Taj

Loyalty to Loyalty
only women that have problem with ma'am are those that have issues with their age

At least when someone uses it you should just acknowledge they're trying to be respectful

I can't tell how many times I've heard some older women jerk back on hearing it and state don't call me ma'am that's my mother.

wasting ppl time yo.
i guess they would die if they reach tnt and someone call dem tantie
 

triniameri

Hey Ms. Carter...
Ms. is not the abbreviation for Miss? If not how is it pronounced?
no it's not the abbreviation for Miss this is used for older women who are not married


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oWa-fP4tLHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


more simply

I would say "miz"
while "miss" I would say = "mis"
 

Poca

Registered User
Ah! Thanks. I learned something today.

no it's not the abbreviation for Miss this is used for older women who are not married


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oWa-fP4tLHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


more simply

I would say "miz"
while "miss" I would say = "mis"
 

Minxy

New member
I was raised to call adults ma'am & sir....in fact in my household if our name was called we never replied with "what?" or "huh" :no2:...it was always "Ma'am?"... "Sir?"
thats the south! My mom tried to get my husband to stop saying "yes ma'am" to her for years :kicks
 

jamaicangirl

Boonoonoonoos
only women that have problem with ma'am are those that have issues with their age

At least when someone uses it you should just acknowledge they're trying to be respectful

I can't tell how many times I've heard some older women jerk back on hearing it and state don't call me ma'am that's my mother.

wasting ppl time yo.
i guess they would die if they reach tnt and someone call dem tantie
No. That is why I started the thread. I find that most AMERICAN women have a problem with being called Ma'am. I myself mentioned that I was called that and didn't like it- and I was 21 (the perfect age) so I did not have a problem with my age.

Recently at work a teenage boy called every woman he met Ma'am and everyone was complaining about it. The women ranged in age from 24 to 64 years.

Ms is pronounced MiZ and Miss is pronounced MiSS.
I only use Ms in writing when I do not know the status of the woman and she does not have another title.

I thought that people only used Tantie for someone old e.g. above 50. Do they call 30 year olds Tantie in TnT? What age do you go from Auntie to Tantie?
 

jamaicangirl

Boonoonoonoos
Ah! Thanks. I learned something today.
It is not used for "older women who are not married". It is meant to be used for all women without another title regardless of their marital status. The same way that Mr. is used for all men without another title regardless of their marital status.

Ms (British English only[citation needed]) or Ms. (American English and British English) (normally /ˈmɪz/ when stressed; when unstressed, either /ˈmɪz/, /mɨz/, /məz/ or /məs/)[1][2] is an English honorific used with the last name or full name of a woman. Ms. is intended as a default form of address for women, regardless of marital status.[3]
 
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