My Yoruba heritage

ProudTrini

New member
I grew up in Princes Town. I've lived in Brooklyn New York for the past 5 years. I'm a Trini man of Yoruba heritage. I speak very little Yoruba if I'm being honest... My mother speaks it sparingly...Her mother (my grandmother) spoke it better but not all that well but my great grandmother was pretty much conversant in it. The reason I say this is that I'm proud to acknowledge my Yoruba heritage.. My BLOOD aunt is in this video from 9:51 to 10:15 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Z862vJpXoo ...Check it out.

I'm very proud of my Yoruba/Orisha heritage.

Enjoy!!!!
 

triniameri

Hey Ms. Carter...
wonderful video! I am going to embed it for you....

<iframe width="520" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3Z862vJpXoo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

dollbabi

Earth Angel
Very nice. My heritage is Yoruba, although no one in my family speak the language. My grandmother has always spoken very proudly of it.
 

Klang

Real Patriot
very interesting... i have a couple questions proud trini...

which part of the island is the yoruba culture practised?

where exactly did your ancestors come from?

how did your great-grandmother learn the language?

did she legally change her name or do many trinis have yoruba surnames?
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
very interesting... i have a couple questions proud trini...

which part of the island is the yoruba culture practised?

where exactly did your ancestors come from?

how did your great-grandmother learn the language?

did she legally change her name or do many trinis have yoruba surnames?
My grandmother was also Yoruba.

Because Trinidad was a relatively large under-populated island after the Abolition of slavery requiring more workers to keep the plantations running, the colonial authorities also enticed indenture labourers to come work the cane fields and some were also enticed from the shores of West Africa and not only from Indian.

Many of the free West Africans who came to Trinidad were Yoruba and were able to keep their religion and language in tack because they did not have to go thru slavery where they were physically punished for practicing their religion and speaking their language.

Yoruba Shango is also one of the elements which contributed to the development of Calypso in Trinidad.

Roaring Lion - Shango Dance (1930's)
<iframe width="550" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/atp6SsN963I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Roaring Lion - Ho Syne No Day (Shango Dance) (1930's)
<iframe width="550" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/e0b52GOSQ7I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

BacchanalDiva

Registered User
Nice thread. Poca, that's probably because while the Igbo, Fon, Kongo and other cultures left their mark on the Caribbean none of them survived in their entirety in the West the way Yoruba culture did. The spiritual traditions of the Yoruba became the umbrella under which the traditions of those other cultures merged. That umbrella created a social structure or glue that held all of the displaced African together. And its not just the English speaking West Indies but the Caribbean and Latin America.
 

dollbabi

Earth Angel
I'm not disputing you but I sense an "obsession" with the Yorubas in th English WI.
Really? I've heard very few people other than Trinidadians speak of Yoruba heritage. What other English-speaking islands do you hear speak of it?
 

Missmayling

Registered User
I'm not disputing you but I sense an "obsession" with the Yorubas in th English WI.
They are talking about African indentured that came to the BWI countries like Trinidad, Jamaica and elsewhere. This is no different than AA talking about Jamaican ancestors that came to the US as migrant workers after slavery. Indians were not the only indentured people taken to the BWI. The British also used Africans, Portuguese, Irish,Germans and Chinese.
 

Klang

Real Patriot
They are talking about African indentured that came to the BWI countries like Trinidad, Jamaica and elsewhere. This is no different than AA talking about Jamaican ancestors that came to the US as migrant workers after slavery. Indians were not the only indentured people taken to the BWI. The British also used Africans, Portuguese, Irish,Germans and Chinese.
wow i learn something new today....i guess they just didnt have as big an impact as the indians and chinese.
 

Poca

Registered User
I guess you're right because it's on imix that it's often mentioned whenever a discussion is about slave ancestors.


Really? I've heard very few people other than Trinidadians speak of Yoruba heritage. What other English-speaking islands do you hear speak of it?
 

Klang

Real Patriot
i will have to do some research, whenever trinis speak of indentured labour they does never mention yorubans. its only chinee and c@@lie. lol. wow. big up ProudTrini for the knowledge
 

Minxy

New member
Really? I've heard very few people other than Trinidadians speak of Yoruba heritage. What other English-speaking islands do you hear speak of it?
really?? There are so many different versions of it...incorporated in so many forms of spirituality...they just don't know it lol
 

Ayisyen

Registered User
Nice thread. Poca, that's probably because while the Igbo, Fon, Kongo and other cultures left their mark on the Caribbean none of them survived in their entirety in the West the way Yoruba culture did. The spiritual traditions of the Yoruba became the umbrella under which the traditions of those other cultures merged. That umbrella created a social structure or glue that held all of the displaced African together. And its not just the English speaking West Indies but the Caribbean and Latin America.
Not true, the traditions of the Fon(Dahomean Vodun) are kept well alive in their entirety in Haiti...including the traditions of the original natives of Dahomey(Gedevi)which no longer exists in Benin now. The only difference is that Haiti's situation is unique in that the traditions of the Fons were merged with the traditions of the Kongo among other African traditions(Nago, Igbo, etc)...with the Fon and Kongo being the parent legs of Haitian Vodou. Unlike places like Cuba were the traditions of different African groups were kept separate with Santeria(yoruba) and palo(kongo).

Due to the position of the Dahomean empire being a major slave trading post in West Africa and them constantly warring with the neighboring yoruba empires(Oyo)...yorubas ended up being the largest African ethnic group brought to the west, followed by the kongos. That is why their traditions are so prevalent across the caribbean and latin america, but yea in terms of African influence in the west overall, the yorubas got that...whether Cuba, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Columbia...a big shout out to the Santeros.
 

dollbabi

Earth Angel
I guess you're right because it's on imix that it's often mentioned whenever a discussion is about slave ancestors.
Not really sure what you mean here. Is it on imix where you first heard of this then? Actually, at least in the case of Trindad, the bulk of Yoruba were said to have arrived after slavery. A significant number formed their own communities as well. So that is the reason why that ethnic identity more prominent.

really?? There are so many different versions of it...incorporated in so many forms of spirituality...they just don't know it lol
The bold is exactly the point. The influence is incorporated in different things, but it seems less specifically spoken of in some islands rather than others since many don't know it. Poca is getting at the actual ethnic identification with Yoruba heritage.
 
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