My Yoruba heritage

i will have to do some research, whenever trinis speak of indentured labour they does never mention yorubans. its only chinee and c@@lie. lol. wow. big up ProudTrini for the knowledge
its amazing that you always generalize and know what trinis speak of and what they dont speak of, do you know all trinis? or all of any nationality?

some trinis dont even know anything about their history, what u expect them 2 talk about?
 

BacchanalDiva

Registered User
Not true, the traditions of the Fon(Dahomean Vodun) are kept well alive in their entirety in Haiti...including the traditions of the original natives of Dahomey(Gedevi)which no longer exists in Benin now. The only difference is that Haiti's situation is unique in that the traditions of the Fons were merged with the traditions of the Kongo among other African traditions(Nago, Igbo, etc)...with the Fon and Kongo being the parent legs of Haitian Vodou. Unlike places like Cuba were the traditions of different African groups were kept separate with Santeria(yoruba) and palo(kongo).

Due to the position of the Dahomean empire being a major slave trading post in West Africa and them constantly warring with the neighboring yoruba empires(Oyo)...yorubas ended up being the largest African ethnic group brought to the west, followed by the kongos. That is why their traditions are so prevalent across the caribbean and latin america, but yea in terms of African influence in the west overall, the yorubas got that...whether Cuba, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Columbia...a big shout out to the Santeros.
I have read that (but forgot) and stand corrected. No disrespect :friends:
 

Klang

Real Patriot
its amazing that you always generalize and know what trinis speak of and what they dont speak of, do you know all trinis? or all of any nationality?

some trinis dont even know anything about their history, what u expect them 2 talk about?
on here when does any trini ever speak of yourba immigration?
 
on here when does any trini ever speak of yourba immigration?
actually a lot of times people talk about stuff like that, we always posting vid, talking bout yoruba and shango/orisha etc, they being instrumental in the development of carnival etc..yet you gloss past that and try to paint your picture

disgusting little child u r
 

Klang

Real Patriot
actually a lot of times people talk about stuff like that, we always posting vid, talking bout yoruba and shango/orisha etc, they being instrumental in the development of carnival etc..yet you gloss past that and try to paint your picture

disgusting little child u r
:kicks hey be proud if you yoruba. i just said i have never seen a thread on here specifically speaking on yoruba immigration. can ou post one for me mr big chat?
 
:kicks hey be proud if you yoruba. i just said i have never seen a thread on here specifically speaking on yoruba immigration. can ou post one for me mr big chat?
we are proud of all that make us who we are

African, Indian, Chinese, European, Middle Eastern and ALL
 
with all the mixing of groups (African tribes), people r probably not even sure of their direct Yoruba heritage. the Igbos, Mandingos and other groups were numerous as well. I never heard of that much Ashantis in Trinidad.

I know Tobago supposedly had a lot of Kongo
 

Missmayling

Registered User
with all the mixing of groups (African tribes), people r probably not even sure of their direct Yoruba heritage. the Igbos, Mandingos and other groups were numerous as well. I never heard of that much Ashantis in Trinidad.

I know Tobago supposedly had a lot of Kongo
How many Blacks would have been able to speak any of these languages after slavery? Most of the indentured Africans were Yoruba and the people from Congo
 

ProudTrini

New member
very interesting... i have a couple questions proud trini...

which part of the island is the yoruba culture practised?

where exactly did your ancestors come from?

how did your great-grandmother learn the language?


did she legally change her name or do many trinis have yoruba surnames?
We don't know EXACTLY where my ancestors came from but the songs that we have in household are EXTREMELY similar (I believe they call it Oriki in Yorubaland) to the present day Yorubas in Ogun State.. The Ijebu clan I believe.

My great grandmother learned the language through her mother who we believe was enslaved from Ogun State, Yoruba land to Trinidad. My great grandmothers mother was the one that was transported here. The Yorubas were one of the very last tribes to be enslaved, that's why Yoruba culture is still very much in the Caribbean/South America. The Yorubas didn't meet slavery until the last 20 years of slavery.

I'm trying to learn the language as we speak. I'm very proud of my heritage.
 

ProudTrini

New member
I'm not disputing you but I sense an "obsession" with the Yorubas in th English WI.
Obsession? I don't believe so. I say I'm Yoruba because I'm actually Yoruba. It's been in my family since we landed in Trini. I don't have any Yoruba names (Well my Yoruba nickname is "Temi Tope" from Yorubas I met in college from Nigeria lol. But the fact my Yoruba language is my family almost 140 years later says alot to me. I'm going to learn the language so I can pass it on to my children.
 

ProudTrini

New member
i will have to do some research, whenever trinis speak of indentured labour they does never mention yorubans. its only chinee and c@@lie. lol. wow. big up ProudTrini for the knowledge
That's bullshit. All of my family proudly rep their Yoruba roots. It's been passed down to us from generation to generation. I don't know about "most Trinis" but I know that there are many Trinis such as myself that have bonafide Yoruba heritage and aren't afraid to show it.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
That's bullshit. All of my family proudly rep their Yoruba roots. It's been passed down to us from generation to generation. I don't know about "most Trinis" but I know that there are many Trinis such as myself that have bonafide Yoruba heritage and aren't afraid to show it.
I am one!
My Grandmother on my Mom's side had 13 Children and always reminded them that our family was of Yoruba heritage and to be proud of it.
 

ProudTrini

New member
I am one!
My Grandmother on my Mom's side had 13 Children and always reminded them that our family was of Yoruba heritage and to be proud of it.
Wow!! I've noticed that many of us that have Yoruba heritage tend to come from proud families :rofl: I can't explain it but I've always been super proud of my Yoruba heritage. it's just something I feel in my gut.
 
Although the Yoruba was huge, the Rada/Dahomey was instrumental of free town/Belmont as well and the Mandingos. So I dont know if there is a cultural connections between the Yoruba and Rada.
 

ProudTrini

New member
Although the Yoruba was huge, the Rada/Dahomey was instrumental of free town/Belmont as well and the Mandingos. So I dont know if there is a cultural connections between the Yoruba and Rada.
All I know is that The Yoruba religion/and language(the latter which I'm learning) has survived in Trinidad. It has also Survived in Brazil, Cuba and Puerto Rico. Many other African and tribes were enslaved but to this day It's the Yoruba culture that has managed to stand the test of time in all these countries. Just the fact it's been passed down in my family says a lot. My family has always valued it's Yoruba culture and I'm celebrating it.
 
Top