Polls show Spitzer with 3-1 margin lead among "black" voters

Lucianite

Registered User
and I think Weiner is up to inthe "black" community


your thoughts on why ?

there is a NYTimes article, I heard - i will try to find it
 

Oneshot

where de crix
we love crooked politicians.

edit.

not in the teefing sense, but in the he has dirt like the average dude.
 

Oneshot

where de crix
always liked spitzer was a shame that a little sexual rump cost him his job...
to be fair that was a setup.. he was gunning for some powerful people on wall street, and the SEC, so he doesnt have many friends in administration or amongst bankers.
 

bhalistix

It is I
to be fair that was a setup.. he was gunning for some powerful people on wall street, and the SEC, so he doesnt have many friends in administration or amongst bankers.

you know set up???? i don't think it was a set up and more of people invested a lot of money into trying to get dirt on him, for the very reason you mentioned. he was doing his dirty already...

I use to hate him because he investigations cost me my job with MMC
 

Lucianite

Registered User
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/09/n...owd.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0&pagewanted=print



Among Blacks, Spitzer and Weiner Find a More Forgiving Crowd
By KATE TAYLOR

Seated on a dais, before a crowd of men and women still picking at their breakfast of fried chicken, sausage, eggs and grits, Eliot Spitzer smiled.

A series of ministers introduced him to the audience of 80 Brooklyn pastors and churchgoers as “a brother” and “a friend.” The audience shouted “Oh yeah” and “All right” as the Rev. Johnny Ray Youngblood, alluding to Mr. Spitzer’s prostitution scandal, said, “We have all sinned and come short before the glory of God.”

The gathering Thursday morning, at First Baptist Church of Crown Heights, was an indication of a striking phenomenon in New York City politics this year: as Mr. Spitzer, a candidate for comptroller, and Anthony D. Weiner, a candidate for mayor, crisscross the city asking residents to look beyond sexual scandal and choose them for high office, they are finding unexpectedly strong support in black communities.

Repeated polling has found a racial gap in the races for mayor and comptroller: black voters are far more likely than white voters to view Mr. Spitzer and Mr. Weiner favorably, and more likely to say they deserve a second chance. And the statistical evidence is reinforced on the campaign trail: last week, for example, the predominantly black audience at a mayoral forum in Laurelton, Queens, cheered Mr. Weiner and jeered at another candidate, George T. McDonald, a Republican, who called Mr. Weiner a “freak.”

Interviews with black ministers, political leaders, scholars and voters suggest two major factors at work: an emphasis in black congregations on forgiveness and redemption, and an experience, particularly among older black voters, of having seen their revered leaders embroiled in scandal.

“You can’t think of any major black leader that did not have some kind of legal or other kind of media attack, so we are not as prone to believe the attacks as other communities,” the Rev. Al Sharpton said in an interview.

Mr. Youngblood agreed, saying, “When we as African Americans look at our history, our own Dr. Martin Luther King, or own Dr. Adam Clayton Powell, there has always been something in a person’s life that others sought to use against their greater good.”

Both candidates have made major efforts to reach out to black voters. Mr. Weiner held his first campaign event at a subway stop in Harlem, and he has spent many Sundays since visiting black churches, where his remarks about the behavior that led to his resignation — sending sexually explicit messages and images to women over the Internet — often draw a sympathetic response. He uses a metaphor of making a wrong turn when driving with a GPS unit, and hearing it say, “Recalculating.”

Several of Mr. Spitzer’s policies while attorney general and governor, like investigations of the Police Department’s use of stop-and-frisk tactics and discrimination against minorities in mortgage lending, as well as his aggressiveness against Wall Street, played well with many blacks.

Mr. Weiner’s relatively modest legislative history, on the other hand, suggests that his popularity among blacks has less to do with his record than with his current predicament.

The Rev. Dr. Marvin J. Bentley, the pastor of Antioch Baptist Church in Corona, Queens, said that he thought that the heightened attacks on Mr. Weiner in recent weeks had galvanized some African-Americans to stick with him, seeing him as a fighter who would not back down.

“I think on the larger scale the African-American community is a little embittered with the political process now, so it’s kind of, ‘If you don’t like this guy, we’ll take him,’ ” he said. Then, with a reference to George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who was acquitted in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager, Trayvon Martin, in Florida, he added: “When you look at the Zimmerman situation and other kinds of factors, and stop and frisk, these are some of the things that we’re still reeling over and angry about. And to see Weiner being beat up, I guess you could say, attacked, because of his own indiscretions or not, I think that there’s a backlash that’s coming from the African-American community.”

Mr. Spitzer, who resigned as governor after his patronization of prostitutes became public, has also kept up a busy schedule of visiting black churches. Last Sunday, at the Bethany Baptist Church in Jamaica, Queens, the minister, Bishop M. Edward Reid, introduced him as “a man of wisdom and a great leader” and accused the news media of magnifying his transgressions.

“Put yourself in his place,” he urged the congregation. “Would you not want to have another opportunity?”

“Yes!” the congregation responded.

At the second church that Mr. Spitzer visited, Mount Horeb Baptist Church in Corona, Jeannette Sullivan, 71, a retired airport security guard, said that all politicians had personal flaws, so there was no reason to hold one misstep against Mr. Spitzer.

“Everybody in politics cheats,” she said, laughing.

For several weeks, polling has showed a gap in the way black and white voters view the candidates. Shortly after Mr. Weiner acknowledged that his online behavior had continued for more than a year after he resigned from Congress, a Quinnipiac poll of likely voters in the Democratic primary found that 64 percent of white voters said that Mr. Weiner should leave the race, while only 42 percent of black voters did.

More recently, a Quinnipiac poll in the comptroller’s race found that 66 percent of white voters said that Mr. Spitzer’s prostitution scandal was a legitimate issue in the comptroller’s race. Only 43 percent of black voters said that it was. And this week, a New York Times/Siena College poll found Mr. Spitzer with strong support among black registered Democrats — 57 percent backed him, compared with 37 percent of white voters.

Fredrick C. Harris, a professor of political science at Columbia and the director of its Center on African-American Politics and Society, said he thought that the high number of black men who had been incarcerated made the notion of second chances in life more important in black communities. He and others noted that African-Americans were very loyal to President Clinton during the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

“I don’t think that African-Americans are more morally lax in their views about these issues than white voters,” he said of sexual scandals. “I just think they come at it from a different perspective, and they have a different socialization, given their everyday experiences, as well as their religious values.”

On Thursday morning, in Crown Heights, Mr. Spitzer received the endorsement of a dozen prominent pastors. His Democratic primary opponent, Scott M. Stringer, seemed to take note. Hours later, Mr. Stringer participated in a protest with the family of Ramarley Graham, an unarmed teenager who was shot by a police officer in the Bronx last year, after a grand jury declined to indict the officer.

Mr. Weiner is continuing to reach out. On Thursday, he passed out cookies at a senior center in Brownsville, Brooklyn, and Thursday night he knocked on doors in Harlem; both neighborhoods have large black populations. But black voters’ relationship with Mr. Weiner seems more fluid, and is complicated by the fact that one of the candidates in the mayoral race, William C. Thompson Jr., is black.

“I think there’s a difference between a poll six weeks out and who goes to the polls,” Mr. Sharpton said. “I think that at the end of the day Thompson will probably get the majority of the black vote.”
 

Lucianite

Registered User
I don't think the church is where they should be received for political gains........

I am NOT judging them for their actions per se - but why don't they just move on - they both have enough wealth to do what they want - well certainly Spitzer....

they had their chance and blew it....

there has to be capable candidates without this baggage
 

bhalistix

It is I
I don't think the church is where they should be received for political gains........
why not? the church still remains the biggest umbrella under which a community gather. The still do alot more for the community that any other faction, hence they need to align themselves and their community with a politician who they feel will benefit the community.

I am NOT judging them for their actions per se - but why don't they just move on - they both have enough wealth to do what they want - well certainly Spitzer....
they had their chance and blew it....
i personal feel he could still do a lot for NY. i don't know about weiner.....




there has to be capable candidates without this baggage
as long as we are in this imperfect world but expect perfection from our public figures we will never have any.
 

Lucianite

Registered User
why not? the church still remains the biggest umbrella under which a community gather. The still do alot more for the community that any other faction, hence they need to align themselves and their community with a politician who they feel will benefit the community.



i personal feel he could still do a lot for NY. i don't know about weiner.....






as long as we are in this imperfect world but expect perfection from our public figures we will never have any
.
not perfect but that was a huge imperfection for a governor -enough to resign... there has to be standards..


I hear you on the church- but to me its about standards... do we resign ourselves to say "no one is perfect" or take a stand that we will not accept certain things from people in power.....

btw - Patterson is backing stringer - that is interesting....
 

Oneshot

where de crix
“I don’t think that African-Americans are more morally lax in their views about these issues than white voters,” he said of sexual scandals. “I just think they come at it from a different perspective, and they have a different socialization, given their everyday experiences, as well as their religious values.”
wtf that supposed to mean?
 

bhalistix

It is I
not perfect but that was a huge imperfection for a governor -enough to resign... there has to be standards..


I hear you on the church- but to me its about standards... do we resign ourselves to say "no one is perfect" or take a stand that we will not accept certain things from people in power.....

btw - Patterson is backing stringer - that is interesting....
It all depends on how you look at a man's little tryst with a side piece. The media acts like America is the embodiment of moral fortitude and the wanna crucify people for having an extra marital affair but we all know better. If he is using public funds to solicit prostitution or any other impropriety i say bury him (not necessary spitzer) dem have another woman, and sexting, dem is papishow vibez to lose a good politician over.
 

bhalistix

It is I
wtf that supposed to mean?

simple black people (not all) see sex scandals differently. Ask yourself why all dem woman can't wait for SCANDALs' return...

You have OLIVIA whoring/home wrecking ass POPE, WHORING herself out to the pu$$y ass PRESIDENT of the united states and his partner. In the process passing up on and upstanding brother, but no one wants to see anything wrong with that....

PS: I am a big fan too, :telephone
 

DSP

Heri
Heard a radio news segment about these 2. The topic was how Americans address scandals somewhat job unrelated as compared to other countries. France and Italy were used for example, where the respective leaders of these countries are known for a bit of 'womanizing' or having mistresses, yet it doesnt affect whether they keep their job.
 

Lucianite

Registered User
It all depends on how you look at a man's little tryst with a side piece. The media acts like America is the embodiment of moral fortitude and the wanna crucify people for having an extra marital affair but we all know better. If he is using public funds to solicit prostitution or any other impropriety i say bury him (not necessary spitzer) dem have another woman, and sexting, dem is papishow vibez to lose a good politician over.

Just a piece on de side and he woulda keep his job but there was some illegal chit like prostitution and using state funds for trip ... So he lucky to get off Scott free and now back.... People in jail for less than that.....media. Hoopla it's the price you pay for certain jobs and levels of levels of fame

Looks like he win without my vote
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Spitzer Redux
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

There will always be candidates for public office who are ethically compromised, temperamentally unsuitable and politically incompetent, but if they insist on running anyway, who has the right to tell them not to? Campaigns sort out the good public servants from the bad.

That said, Eliot Spitzer’s bid to recycle himself by running for New York City comptroller is unnerving on many levels, and not just because he has suddenly decided to undo the buckles of self-restraint that used to keep disgraced ex-politicians (for soliciting prostitutes, in his case) from re-entering the public sphere. Beyond that, there are Mr. Spitzer’s colossal failures in what he did and didn’t do as governor of New York.

This was the man who built a solid record and shiny reputation as a hard-charging attorney general, then squandered it in 14 months in the governor’s office. He had whipped Wall Street and was going to fix Albany, but left it more broken than when he got there.

When he quit — and who can forget how Mr. Spitzer’s stricken wife stood beside him as he announced that it was all over? — he betrayed not just the voters, but the staff members, agency leaders and employees who had followed him to Albany, or moved over from the attorney general’s office, with the goal of healing the Capitol’s sick culture. They were his team, bursting with all the idealism and commitment that he professed to have, promising to make the Spitzer administration a model of integrity and effectiveness.

That never happened. Desperately needed reforms were thwarted, opportunities lost — and it was more than a sexual scandal that made Mr. Spitzer’s truncated governorship an exceptional debacle in a capital city that is debacle central. It was that he saw himself as a “steamroller” instead of a leader, that he stoked alienation and resentment in his allies as well as his adversaries, the opposite of what a competent politician should do.

New Yorkers, like all citizens, deserve serious and thoughtful political campaigns, but between Anthony Weiner, the former sexting congressman, and Client 9 (the name given to Mr. Spitzer in the federal investigation of the escort service he used) and the self-described madam who ran that escort service and now claims she’s going to run against her former customer, the stage is set for a summer of farce.

Mr. Spitzer, like Mr. Weiner, is a political animal who clearly finds it hard not to have an audience. That’s understandable, but did they have to bring us all along on their journeys of personal ambition? For these two charter members of the Kardashian Party, notoriety is looking like the quick, easy path to redemption. Witness the TV-and-tabloid free-for-all on Monday in Union Square, where Mr. Spitzer went to greet voters, collect petition signatures and get his face out there. If he makes it on the ballot, he will doubtless discuss issues and ideas like the policy wonk he is. But he will also use his money and name recognition to suck all attention from the other candidates, especially the capable Manhattan borough president, Scott Stringer, who deserves better treatment.

Voters will have to do their best to tune out the nois
 
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