Quuestion to American Imixers

mz_JazE

Southern Belle
I had a professor in school that slipped and said "negros" when speaking about a law that had the term "negro" in it.

OMGAAAAAAWWWWWD...it had some reaaaally pissed off people.
:kicks I bet they were

At the the March on Washington Anniversary President Lyndon B. Johnson daughter referred to us as "Negroes" :lol:...then she followed up by calling Jaime Fox "Jimmy" Fox...smdh :rofl:
when she did that my mother's face just dropped, and I was like "oooooh."

I thought that this was a question to Americans. Are there so many Americans on IMIX?
yes, and are you asking why are there so many Americans on Imix?
 

jamaicangirl

Boonoonoonoos
:kicks I bet they were


when she did that my mother's face just dropped, and I was like "oooooh."


yes, and are you asking why are there so many Americans on Imix?
No. I was wondering why the Caribbean people were answering. This is discussed at least once per month here but I wanted to hear what the new American members had to say about the issue.
 

jamaicangirl

Boonoonoonoos
There are a number of people born & raised in the U.S. on here.
I know. I remember that you are American by birth. I just don't think that someone whose parents are from a Caribbean island can answer the question the same way that a "real" African American can. A person whose great grandparents picked tobacco in Louisiana or Cotton in Georgia.

If you are clearly Trinidadian then you are not going to want to be called African-American because it does not refer to your Trinidadian heritage. If you are Nigerian parented then you are Nigerian-American. American nationality. Nigerian culture.

I thought that the question was about African American vs. Negro or Black or Colored or African descent. I guess that I didn't realize what the OP was asking. No big deal.
 

dollbabi

Earth Angel
I know. I remember that you are American by birth. I just don't think that someone whose parents are from a Caribbean island can answer the question the same way that a "real" African American can. A person whose great grandparents picked tobacco in Louisiana or Cotton in Georgia.

If you are clearly Trinidadian then you are not going to want to be called African-American because it does not refer to your Trinidadian heritage. If you are Nigerian parented then you are Nigerian-American. American nationality. Nigerian culture.

I thought that the question was about African American vs. Negro or Black or Colored or African descent. I guess that I didn't realize what the OP was asking. No big deal.
Yes, TC gave no explanation as to the reason for her question in the beginning. It seemed from the first answers that she was asking if those of us who were born here had an issue with the term.

It was only after she explained that we knew what she was talking about. But either way, she just asked whether or not we personally felt it was suitable for us. Had she specified what ethnic group she wanted to answer, then some of us wouldn't have answered.

But I will say, that there are some people of Caribbean descent that are accepting of the term Afro/African-American, even though I do agree with you overall.
 

DSP

Heri
No. I was wondering why the Caribbean people were answering. This is discussed at least once per month here but I wanted to hear what the new American members had to say about the issue.
There are more Americans that post than there are Caribbeans that post.
 
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