St Lucia...The home of sweet zouk Music...

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
and why wouldnt they make the theme song a zouk song? i mean this must be a joke, maybe bhalstix who say we claiming people culture can give us some background news on this?

<iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F100239890"></iframe>
Under brilliant sunshine and filled with unstoppable passion the diverse cultures of many continents flow freely within the heart of St. Lucia. From such diversity comes a strength and desire to triumph that could never be stifled. This is best seen in two vital points of unity for this magnificent island.

Cricket and Zouk.

They were both birthed from the undeniable rebellion grown in the hearts of our ancestors.

Zouk combines pulsating African rhythms derived from the percussive soul of the vast continent with more recent western influences of Jazz, Blues, and Electronica, to create a music that builds a free party atmosphere and energy, which are impossible to quell.

Meanwhile, Cricket was brought to the island by colonists, but was perfected by islanders as they merged the natural strength and grace of their forefathers with these foreign rules of play to become fearsome giants in a game that is now loved the world over.

On Tuesday 6th August, when the lights go up in the Beausejour Stadium these two vibrant elements will be combined, as glorious Cricket will be fueled by Zouk rhythms and percussion to create West Indian history in the first ever Caribbean Premier League.

This assuredly momentous occasion has been embodied in the pulsating theme song, “Zouks On Fire”, sung by St. Lucia’s own Sir Lancealot, for the aptly named St. Lucia Zouks, led by Team Captain Darren Sammy.

The infectious song is sure to have the crowds cheering and singing along, encouraging the talented cricketers to take the grounds fired up and ready to charge ahead.

And as the conch shells signal the many 6’s and 4’s storming the field of play in this unique display of Carnival Cricket, St. Lucia’s heart and soul, heritage and culture, will be melded as fiercely together as the St. Lucia Zouks fans to its victorious players.

Credits:

Sir Lancealot – Zouks on Fire (St. Lucia Zouks Theme Song for CPL)
Performed by Lance “Sir Lancealot” Mongroo
Recorded at Kronic Heights Music by Francis "Leebo" DeLima
Written by Patrick “Mista Vybe” Gordon and Kasey Phillips
Guitars by Carlos Bridge
Produced and Mixed by Precision Productions

Mastered by Mike Wells, CA.

Big-up to the St Lucia Zouks!! :good:
 

Klang

Real Patriot
the soca warriors theme song, was a soca song was it not? the reggae boyz theme song was regae was it not? why is a team named zouk song a soca song? this is a mockery to the genre

that post was useless, so far we have 2 or 3 songs that can pass for zouk with one of them being in full english, and none by the same artist, and none by a band. right now you and the lucians are searching youtube like crazy for random zouk songs that ya'll think are from lucia. that is risky as we have seen, because bhlastix psoted a random song that was not remotely lucian. this thread should be at 10 pages now
 

bhalistix

It is I
the soca warriors theme song, was a soca song was it not? the reggae boyz theme song was regae was it not? why is a team named zouk song a soca song? this is a mockery to the genre

that post was useless, so far we have 2 or 3 songs that can pass for zouk with one of them being in full english, and none by the same artist, and none by a band. right now you and the lucians are searching youtube like crazy for random zouk songs that ya'll think are from lucia. that is risky as we have seen, because bhlastix psoted a random song that was not remotely lucian. this thread should be at 10 pages now

hahahahahahaha dude slit you wrist or something, get over yourself captain zouk.....

Let me ask you a question was zouk created in Dominica?

GO!!!!
 

Klang

Real Patriot
hahahahahahaha dude slit you wrist or something, get over yourself captain zouk.....

Let me ask you a question was zouk created in Dominica?

GO!!!!
so you dont even know enough zouk music from your own country to post? i dont know why you choose to put the spotlight back on dominica. but yes, lets keep it interesting.... zouk was created in dominica, and i can to back up that statement.
 

Carib2

Registered User
One of my favourites, got the Jaunty album with this sweet zouk track.
This Lucian style of zouk is superior to anything I have heard from Dominica over the years;
Only zouk music from Guadeloupe and Martinique can match this in my humble opinion.

Jaunty - Ladje Mwen
<iframe width="550" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/1jpl5scLqp0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Big-up to the St Lucian Zouks, the Dominicans are all jealous thieves who are not worthy! :good:
LOOOOOOOL Dominicans are the thieves now?? LOL too funny...
 

bhalistix

It is I
so you dont even know enough zouk music from your own country to post? i dont know why you choose to put the spotlight back on dominica. but yes, lets keep it interesting.... zouk was created in dominica, and i can to back up that statement.
GREAT so go ahead and promote it, bombard us here in SOCA CHAT with the ZOUK from the great ZOUK nation. No lucian never claim St. Lucia as the birth place of ZOUK but you want to burden us with the responsibility of promoting your music because some well to do executive of a professional team give the team that name ZOUK.

Get over yourself already.

In the past you seem to be able to find all kind of videos from st. lucia to illustrate what ever point you you wish to make so i am sure if you want zouk from slu can find it. Much like ever other person in soca chat i have a deep appreciation for my island music, once the artist behind it is LUCIAN i don't care what genre it is it LUCIAN. And like everyone else in here, besides you, i spend my time trying to promoting music, particular SOCA, by posting latest release - by various artist from st. lucia.

maybe you should give it a try...

Outside of Dominca st. lucia is the only English speaking island in the caribbean, perhaps even the world, who can appreciate zouk, konpa, candence, etc. so instead of getting a hard on every time you hear Lucian helping you promote your music you should be thankful instead of exposing you ignorant ass to the world.

PS: ask you country mate Kavem Ajoel Rakem Hodge, Shane Shellingford, Liam Andrew Shannon Sebastien what team they play for.


nuff said
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
so you dont even know enough zouk music from your own country to post? i dont know why you choose to put the spotlight back on dominica. but yes, lets keep it interesting.... zouk was created in dominica, and i can to back up that statement.
Really?! Maybe you need to start by challenging Wikipedia for promoting this misinformation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zouk

Zouk

Zouk or Zouk béton
is a fast tempo carnival style of music originating from the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, popularized by the French Antilles kassav in the 1980s.

Zouk means festival, well-named because it uses carnival rhythms and contains West African influences. Zouk arose in the early to mid-1980s from kadans. Elements of gwo ka, tambour, ti bwa and biguine vidé are prominent in zouk. The French Creole tongue of Martinique and Guadeloupe is an important element, and are a distinctive part of the music.

In Africa, it gained popularity in francophone and lusophone countries. In Europe, it was particularly popular in France and in North America in the Canadian province of Quebec.

History

Guadeloupeans Jacob Desvarieux and the brothers Decimus are widely credited for having created the zouk beton phenomenon in the high-tech recording studios of Paris in the 1980s. In 1978, Pierre Edouard Decimus relocated in Paris after a successful career in the French Antilles. Pierre Edouard Decimus was on the verge of retirement from the music business until he and his brother Georges Decimus met fellow Guadeloupean Jacob Desvarieux, a popular guitarist/songwriter kwown in Paris as a studio wizard. The surroundings of the Paris music recording technology gave him the idea of making "just one more record". Subsequently, Pierre Edouard Decimus, his brother, and Jacob Desvarieux pulled together a team of Paris-based Antilles musicians and created a group named Kassav' and a new sound called zouk. The original Kassav' was all Guadeloupean but was later joined by Martiniquans Jean-Claude Naimro, Claude Vamur, Jean-Phillipe Marthely, Jocelyn Berouard and Guadeloupean Patrick St-Eloi . Kassav' created its own style by introducing an eleven-piece gwo ka unit and two lead singers, tambour, ti bwa, biguine, cadence-lypso: calypso and mostly cadence or compas with full use of the MIDI technology. Originally, Kassav' style had a certain political dimension. Their famous song "zouk-la se sel medikaman nou ni" implied that zouk constituted a banner for the cultural unity of Guadeloupe and Martinique.

In Jocelyn Guilbault’s seminal book on the subject, “Zouk: World Music in the West Indies,” she states that “Zouk is the creation of black, Creole-speaking Antillean artists,” and puts forth the theory that it is the product of the struggle to form some kind of national identity among the four islands, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, and St. Lucia. All four share a similar colonial past, having been under both French and English rule at various points in their history, and are populated predominantly by blacks, who are the descendants of African slaves.

Music authors Charles De Ledesma and Gene Scaramuzzo trace zouk's development to the Guadeloupean gwo ka and Martinican bèlè (tambour and ti bwa)[2] folk traditions. Ethnomusicologist Jocelyn Guilbault, however, describes zouk as a synthesis of Caribbean popular styles, especially Dominica cadence-lypso, Haitian cadence, Guadeloupean biguine.[3] Zouk arose in the late 1970s and early 1980s, using elements of previous styles of Antillean music, as well as imported genres.

Kassav

The leading band to emerge from this period was Kassav', who came from Guadeloupe and Martinique with a music repertoire of 85% compas music. They gave the style a pan-Caribbean sound by taking elements from compas, reggae, and salsa music, and became one of the most famous bands of the genre in the world. Kassav' was formed in 1979 by Pierre-Edouard Décimus, a long-time professional musician who worked with Freddy Marshall. Together, the two of them decided to take carnival music and make it a more modern and polished style. Their first album, Love and Ka Dance (1980), established the sound of zouk. They continued to grow more popular, both as a group and with several members' solo careers, finally peaking in 1984 with Yélélé, which featured the international hit "Zouk-la-sé Sel Médikaman Nou Ni". With this hit, zouk rapidly became the most widespread dance craze to hit Latin American in some time, and was wildly popular even as far afield as Europe and Asia. With Kassav's popularity, Zouk and mostly the compas music they feature became the most widespread dance to hit the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa. Zouk became known for wildly theatrical concerts featuring special effects spectacles, colorful costumes and outrageous antics.

Kassav music, which features the fast zouk beton and mostly compas music has thrilled and inspired millions of fans from around the world. The influence of kassav has been felt in Brazilian lambada and other Caribbean styles like bouyon, soca and combined rhythm, as well as African styles such as soukous, Zouglou, Coupe-Decale, and Gumbe.

Origins

Zouk beton and mostly meringue-compas or cadence are the popular music of the French Antilles of Guadeloupe and Martinique.

Zouk béton

Zouk béton is the original zouk, a fast tempo carnival style popularized by the superb group Kassav in the 1980s. Kassav, the originator of the zouk, remain the best French Antillean group. The band mixed gwo ka, tambour, ti bwa, biguine, cadence-lypso: calypso and mostly cadence or compas with full use of the MIDI technology. The style lost ground in the 80s due to the strong presence of compas music, the main music of the French Antilles.

Kassav' drew in influences from balakadri and bal granmoun dances, biguine's and mazurka's, along with more contemporary Caribbean influences like compas, reggae and salsa music. Zouk live shows soon began to draw on American and European rock and heavy metal traditions, and the genre spread across the world, primarily in developing countries.

Zouk-love or the French Antilles compas music

Zouk Love is the French Antilles cadence or compas music, characterized by a slow, soft and sexual rhythm. The lyrics of the songs often speak of love and sentimental problems.

The music cabo-love from Cape Verde and Kizomba from Angola are also derivatives of this French Antillean compas music style, which sounds basically the same. A main exponent of this sub-genré is Ophelia Marie. Other artists come from the French West Indies, the Netherlands, and Africa.

Popular artists include French West Indian artists Edith Lefel and Nichols, or like Netherlands based Suzanna Lubrano and Gil Semedo, the African artist Kaysha.

Etymology

The word Zouk means "party" or "festival" in the local Antillean Creole of French, although the word originally referred to, and is still used to refer to, a popular dance, based on the Polish dance, the mazurka (mazouk), that was introduced to the French Caribbean in the 19th Century. Actually the Creole word zouke, sekwe, zouke, etc. from the French verb "secouer" meaning "shake intensely and repeatedly" was used by Haitian artists who toured the French Antilles during the 80s.
 

Klang

Real Patriot
GREAT so go ahead and promote it, bombard us here in SOCA CHAT with the ZOUK from the great ZOUK nation. No lucian never claim St. Lucia as the birth place of ZOUK but you want to burden us with the responsibility of promoting your music because some well to do executive of a professional team give the team that name ZOUK.

Get over yourself already.

In the past you seem to be able to find all kind of videos from st. lucia to illustrate what ever point you you wish to make so i am sure if you want zouk from slu can find it. Much like ever other person in soca chat i have a deep appreciation for my island music, once the artist behind it is LUCIAN i don't care what genre it is it LUCIAN. And like everyone else in here, besides you, i spend my time trying to promoting music particular SOCA by posting latest release by various artist from st. lucia.

maybe you should give it a try...

Outside of Dominca st. lucia is the only English speaking island in the caribbean, perhaps even the world, who can appreciate zouk, konpa, candence, etc. so instead of getting a hard on every time you hear Lucian helping you promote your music you should be thankful instead of exposing you ignorant ass to the world.

PS: ask you country mate Kavem Ajoel Rakem Hodge, Shane Shellingford, Liam Andrew Shannon Sebastien what team they play for.


nuff said
:kicks what does that have to do with anything? many athletes dont love the team they play for but they love the sport and love the money...
 

Klang

Real Patriot
Really?! Maybe you need to start by challenging Wikipedia for promoting this misinformation:

Zouk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Zouk

Zouk or Zouk béton
is a fast tempo carnival style of music originating from the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, popularized by the French Antilles kassav in the 1980s.

Zouk means festival, well-named because it uses carnival rhythms and contains West African influences. Zouk arose in the early to mid-1980s from kadans. Elements of gwo ka, tambour, ti bwa and biguine vidé are prominent in zouk. The French Creole tongue of Martinique and Guadeloupe is an important element, and are a distinctive part of the music.

In Africa, it gained popularity in francophone and lusophone countries. In Europe, it was particularly popular in France and in North America in the Canadian province of Quebec.

History

Guadeloupeans Jacob Desvarieux and the brothers Decimus are widely credited for having created the zouk beton phenomenon in the high-tech recording studios of Paris in the 1980s. In 1978, Pierre Edouard Decimus relocated in Paris after a successful career in the French Antilles. Pierre Edouard Decimus was on the verge of retirement from the music business until he and his brother Georges Decimus met fellow Guadeloupean Jacob Desvarieux, a popular guitarist/songwriter kwown in Paris as a studio wizard. The surroundings of the Paris music recording technology gave him the idea of making "just one more record". Subsequently, Pierre Edouard Decimus, his brother, and Jacob Desvarieux pulled together a team of Paris-based Antilles musicians and created a group named Kassav' and a new sound called zouk. The original Kassav' was all Guadeloupean but was later joined by Martiniquans Jean-Claude Naimro, Claude Vamur, Jean-Phillipe Marthely, Jocelyn Berouard and Guadeloupean Patrick St-Eloi . Kassav' created its own style by introducing an eleven-piece gwo ka unit and two lead singers, tambour, ti bwa, biguine, cadence-lypso: calypso and mostly cadence or compas with full use of the MIDI technology. Originally, Kassav' style had a certain political dimension. Their famous song "zouk-la se sel medikaman nou ni" implied that zouk constituted a banner for the cultural unity of Guadeloupe and Martinique.

In Jocelyn Guilbault’s seminal book on the subject, “Zouk: World Music in the West Indies,” she states that “Zouk is the creation of black, Creole-speaking Antillean artists,” and puts forth the theory that it is the product of the struggle to form some kind of national identity among the four islands, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, and St. Lucia. All four share a similar colonial past, having been under both French and English rule at various points in their history, and are populated predominantly by blacks, who are the descendants of African slaves.

Music authors Charles De Ledesma and Gene Scaramuzzo trace zouk's development to the Guadeloupean gwo ka and Martinican bèlè (tambour and ti bwa)[2] folk traditions. Ethnomusicologist Jocelyn Guilbault, however, describes zouk as a synthesis of Caribbean popular styles, especially Dominica cadence-lypso, Haitian cadence, Guadeloupean biguine.[3] Zouk arose in the late 1970s and early 1980s, using elements of previous styles of Antillean music, as well as imported genres.

Kassav

The leading band to emerge from this period was Kassav', who came from Guadeloupe and Martinique with a music repertoire of 85% compas music. They gave the style a pan-Caribbean sound by taking elements from compas, reggae, and salsa music, and became one of the most famous bands of the genre in the world. Kassav' was formed in 1979 by Pierre-Edouard Décimus, a long-time professional musician who worked with Freddy Marshall. Together, the two of them decided to take carnival music and make it a more modern and polished style. Their first album, Love and Ka Dance (1980), established the sound of zouk. They continued to grow more popular, both as a group and with several members' solo careers, finally peaking in 1984 with Yélélé, which featured the international hit "Zouk-la-sé Sel Médikaman Nou Ni". With this hit, zouk rapidly became the most widespread dance craze to hit Latin American in some time, and was wildly popular even as far afield as Europe and Asia. With Kassav's popularity, Zouk and mostly the compas music they feature became the most widespread dance to hit the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa. Zouk became known for wildly theatrical concerts featuring special effects spectacles, colorful costumes and outrageous antics.

Kassav music, which features the fast zouk beton and mostly compas music has thrilled and inspired millions of fans from around the world. The influence of kassav has been felt in Brazilian lambada and other Caribbean styles like bouyon, soca and combined rhythm, as well as African styles such as soukous, Zouglou, Coupe-Decale, and Gumbe.

Origins

Zouk beton and mostly meringue-compas or cadence are the popular music of the French Antilles of Guadeloupe and Martinique.

Zouk béton

Zouk béton is the original zouk, a fast tempo carnival style popularized by the superb group Kassav in the 1980s. Kassav, the originator of the zouk, remain the best French Antillean group. The band mixed gwo ka, tambour, ti bwa, biguine, cadence-lypso: calypso and mostly cadence or compas with full use of the MIDI technology. The style lost ground in the 80s due to the strong presence of compas music, the main music of the French Antilles.

Kassav' drew in influences from balakadri and bal granmoun dances, biguine's and mazurka's, along with more contemporary Caribbean influences like compas, reggae and salsa music. Zouk live shows soon began to draw on American and European rock and heavy metal traditions, and the genre spread across the world, primarily in developing countries.

Zouk-love or the French Antilles compas music

Zouk Love is the French Antilles cadence or compas music, characterized by a slow, soft and sexual rhythm. The lyrics of the songs often speak of love and sentimental problems.

The music cabo-love from Cape Verde and Kizomba from Angola are also derivatives of this French Antillean compas music style, which sounds basically the same. A main exponent of this sub-genré is Ophelia Marie. Other artists come from the French West Indies, the Netherlands, and Africa.

Popular artists include French West Indian artists Edith Lefel and Nichols, or like Netherlands based Suzanna Lubrano and Gil Semedo, the African artist Kaysha.

Etymology

The word Zouk means "party" or "festival" in the local Antillean Creole of French, although the word originally referred to, and is still used to refer to, a popular dance, based on the Polish dance, the mazurka (mazouk), that was introduced to the French Caribbean in the 19th Century. Actually the Creole word zouke, sekwe, zouke, etc. from the French verb "secouer" meaning "shake intensely and repeatedly" was used by Haitian artists who toured the French Antilles during the 80s.
yes i do
 

SKBai1991

Registered User
mwen pa ka bay manti...naming St Lucia's team the Zouks is kinda silly since St Lucia aint have all that much to do with the development of Zouk music really. & the theme song not even in Kreyol either, sans-wont -_-
 

Klang

Real Patriot
mwen pa ka bay manti...naming St Lucia's team the Zouks is kinda silly since St Lucia aint have all that much to do with the development of Zouk music really. & the theme song not even in Kreyol either, sans-wont -_-
no offence but try absolutely nothing to do with the development of zouk. like i said in another thread just because they happen to speak creole, a very broken creole at that, anglophones over hype their impact on the french Caribbean region. that is as silly as saying st kitts and trinidad both speak english so they have both share the same culture and have made the same big impact.
 

Maruka

Qualified Mixologist
One of my favourites, got the Jaunty album with this sweet zouk track.
This Lucian style of zouk is superior to anything I have heard from Dominica over the years;
Only zouk music from Guadeloupe and Martinique can match this in my humble opinion.

Jaunty - Ladje Mwen
<iframe width="550" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/1jpl5scLqp0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Big-up to the St Lucian Zouks, the Dominicans are all jealous thieves who are not worthy! :good:
I mean i respect your opinion but damn bruh as someone who promote them self as a DJ you open about being an absolute ignorant person on the internet so?

Seriously if someone hire you to play at a fete and they want zouk i would be very afraid to see what u going play :kicks top of that who wants to hire somone who posts labass rubbish like that when you might have to play for other Dominicans in the fete too? yuh serious ghoss?
 

FourOneSix Man

Registered User
This thread confuses me. So the issue here is that because St. Lucia is not a powerhouse in zouk music, their sports team shouldn't be called the Saint Lucian zouks ? Last I heard, Lucians identify with zouk music and have incorporated it into their own culture. I don't see the problem.

People must have been real pissed when they found out that Toronto named it's basketball team "the Raptors." After all, Raptors have never lived in Canada, much less Toronto. Plus, our team theme song has nothing to do with Raptors nor was it composed by one. And I'm willing to bet that the average Toronto person has no interest in learning about raptors.
 
Top