Trinidad and Tobago may decide to get tough!

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
For some odd reason I can't find the original thread dealing with this topic! :blind:

Griffith: CSME spirit abused...
Illegals Will be deported
Published: Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Geisha Kowlessar (Trinidad Guardian)

People trying to enter Trinidad and Tobago with bogus credentials and trickery will be denied entry and sent back to their home countries, says National Security Minister Gary Griffith. Griffith made the comment yesterday as he warned foreigners that if they did not meet this country’s strict entry requirements they would not be allowed in.

The minister, in a telephone interview, said there were some 30,000 illegal immigrants, including those from Jamaica, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Guyana and other Caribbean countries and various parts of Africa, living and working in T&T, who were not paying taxes and denying locals of job opportunities. Immigration sources said yesterday that they also intend to locate illegal immigrants in T&T and deport them to their respective countries.

Asked to elaborate on his plans to tackle illegal immigrants, Griffith said he preferred not to comment, as there were sensitive talks now taking place between T&T and Jamaica regarding the recent deportation of 13 Jamaicans at Piarco International Airport. The deportation has led to angry reaction from Jamaica’s business groups and citizens, who have launched social media campaigns calling for a boycott of goods from this country and next year’s Carnival festivities in T&T.

To placate the situation, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Dookeran has been invited by his Jamaican counterpart, Arnold J Nicholson, to talks aimed at resolving the dispute. Yesterday, Griffith said T&T was not being “obnoxious” in blocking those who failed to produce valid documents at the ports of entry. “We cannot continue to have a situation where people are coming into the country and robbing the State of millions by not paying taxes,” he said.

“What is even worse is that T&T citizens who are in dire need of a job cannot get one because these people are robbing them the opportunity to do so.” He maintained there were many flocking to T&T from other Caribbean countries using the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) policy as a means of doing so, but said this must be halted since many of them arrived here although they did not meet the requirements. “This is clearly a worrying and frightening situation for T&T,” Griffith said.

“The immigration officers will continue to do their duty and those who do not meet the necessary requirements will be sent back...It’s as clear as that.” “Those coming under CSME should already have knowledge about the programme before entering a country. The onus is on them to be aware of the guidelines, so when they reach immigration all their documents would be in order.”

He said he was taking the stance, not only to protect the rights of citizens, but also the welfare of foreigners. “If someone slipped through immigration and ends up in Trinidad and they have no job to rely on, then they could end up on the streets and this could also lead to a life of crime,” Griffith said. “This is definitely what we do not want in Trinidad. The problem is multifaceted and we have to deal with it as soon as possible.”

The issue continues to gain regional and international attention and was yesterday raised in the editorial of Jamaica’s Gleaner newspaper, which said the two main issues to be looked at were trade and the free movement of people within the region. “On the matter of trade, the quarrel is primarily with Trinidad and Tobago, the community’s strongest and major manufacturer. More than 90 per cent of our near US$1 billion trade deficit with Caricom is with Trinidad and Tobago,” the Gleaner said.

“Jamaica’s manufacturers have primary complaints against the Trinidadians: that Port-of-Spain uses its domestically available cheap energy to subsidise its enterprises, that it cheats on Caricom rules-of-origin requirements, and that it uses non-tariff barriers to deny access to its markets by Jamaicans.”
 

notorious saga

Sagattarius
Now they planning to deport illegals? it's a little late to do that now. LOL@30,000 it's way way more than that. how the hell it could have 17,000 Jamaicans but 30,000 total illegals from other places too? T&T been too slack with their immigration laws from years ago, it's too late to start that shit now. yuh might get the newcomers but it have people living in T&T donkey years wid children, grandchildren and greatgrand kids.
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
This might rile some people up but a lot of people are suggesting that it is these illegals who are at the heart of the crime problem in tnt.
 

Poca

Registered User
Immigrants, illegals or not, are often the ones being scapegoated when a country is not doing to well. They are easy targets and it's easy for a government to turn the spotlight on them rather on something else. And of course, without immigrants, all countries would be crimeless!

IMO, the most effective way would be to highly fine those companies /stores / merchants etc who hire those illegal immigrants. That country's attraction would decrease greatly.



This might rile some people up but a lot of people are suggesting that it is these illegals who are at the heart of the crime problem in tnt.
 

robblaten

New member
For some odd reason I can't find the original thread dealing with this topic! :blind:

Griffith: CSME spirit abused...
Illegals Will be deported
Published: Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Geisha Kowlessar (Trinidad Guardian)

People trying to enter Trinidad and Tobago with bogus credentials and trickery will be denied entry and sent back to their home countries, says National Security Minister Gary Griffith. Griffith made the comment yesterday as he warned foreigners that if they did not meet this country’s strict entry requirements they would not be allowed in.

The minister, in a telephone interview, said there were some 30,000 illegal immigrants, including those from Jamaica, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Guyana and other Caribbean countries and various parts of Africa, living and working in T&T, who were not paying taxes and denying locals of job opportunities. Immigration sources said yesterday that they also intend to locate illegal immigrants in T&T and deport them to their respective countries.

Asked to elaborate on his plans to tackle illegal immigrants, Griffith said he preferred not to comment, as there were sensitive talks now taking place between T&T and Jamaica regarding the recent deportation of 13 Jamaicans at Piarco International Airport. The deportation has led to angry reaction from Jamaica’s business groups and citizens, who have launched social media campaigns calling for a boycott of goods from this country and next year’s Carnival festivities in T&T.

To placate the situation, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Dookeran has been invited by his Jamaican counterpart, Arnold J Nicholson, to talks aimed at resolving the dispute. Yesterday, Griffith said T&T was not being “obnoxious” in blocking those who failed to produce valid documents at the ports of entry. “We cannot continue to have a situation where people are coming into the country and robbing the State of millions by not paying taxes,” he said.

“What is even worse is that T&T citizens who are in dire need of a job cannot get one because these people are robbing them the opportunity to do so.” He maintained there were many flocking to T&T from other Caribbean countries using the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) policy as a means of doing so, but said this must be halted since many of them arrived here although they did not meet the requirements. “This is clearly a worrying and frightening situation for T&T,” Griffith said.

“The immigration officers will continue to do their duty and those who do not meet the necessary requirements will be sent back...It’s as clear as that.” “Those coming under CSME should already have knowledge about the programme before entering a country. The onus is on them to be aware of the guidelines, so when they reach immigration all their documents would be in order.”

He said he was taking the stance, not only to protect the rights of citizens, but also the welfare of foreigners. “If someone slipped through immigration and ends up in Trinidad and they have no job to rely on, then they could end up on the streets and this could also lead to a life of crime,” Griffith said. “This is definitely what we do not want in Trinidad. The problem is multifaceted and we have to deal with it as soon as possible.”

The issue continues to gain regional and international attention and was yesterday raised in the editorial of Jamaica’s Gleaner newspaper, which said the two main issues to be looked at were trade and the free movement of people within the region. “On the matter of trade, the quarrel is primarily with Trinidad and Tobago, the community’s strongest and major manufacturer. More than 90 per cent of our near US$1 billion trade deficit with Caricom is with Trinidad and Tobago,” the Gleaner said.

“Jamaica’s manufacturers have primary complaints against the Trinidadians: that Port-of-Spain uses its domestically available cheap energy to subsidise its enterprises, that it cheats on Caricom rules-of-origin requirements, and that it uses non-tariff barriers to deny access to its markets by Jamaicans.”
The problem is the crazy CSME free movement foolishness. Trinidad will come to regret this yet.
 

Georgeflash

Who feels it knows it!
This might rile some people up but a lot of people are suggesting that it is these illegals who are at the heart of the crime problem in tnt.
17,000 illegal Jamaicans?
Then of course you will have crime problems
17 Jamaicans is too many much less 17,000.

These people are criminals.
 

Buhbayduss

change is up to us...
There is alot hypocrisy on this site... only when the shoe is burning, then it's ok to cry fowl and find solutions... the late David Thompson(PM of Barbados) said something similar... SMFH...
 

dedetriniking

Registered User
17,000 illegal Jamaicans?
Then of course you will have crime problems
17 Jamaicans is too many much less 17,000.

These people are criminals.
People does be talking bout guyanese more than any other nationality. I'm not saying its my opinion i'm just saying that it is a widely held view by tnt citizens that deportees and illegals contribute to the crime situation in tnt.....in a big way.

Poca is right though...immigrants are easy targets....and we know that kind finger pointing at easy targets is something that countries do regardless of what part of the world they are.

 

robblaten

New member
Can you expand on this a bit boss....your views have traveled far.
Trinidad, like most of the region, committed itself to the revised treaty of Chaguaramas (CSME), which contains provisions that allow for the free movement of, inter alia, skilled workers throughout the Caribbean region. One of the unintended consequences was that, following the Myrie decision in the CCJ, the regional court asserted its jurisdiction over matters affecting regional immigration.

All of this means the country must now brace for an all out assault by prospective immigrants from the region looking to settle there. It was a really dumb thing to commit to and I am very happy that we in the Bahamas refused.
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
skilled workers.. no different from where Canada has a skilled migrant program, as does the US...

however, i think when it comes down to the nationality that Trinis find problematic, its not Jamaicans but rather Guyanese.. the GUyanese are our Mexicans per se... they have been embroiled in numerous dramas with respect to being used to pad voting and all sorts of things where they squatting and doing things of that nature... i think they've rounded up a couple of them and sent them back numerous time..
 
Trinidad, like most of the region, committed itself to the revised treaty of Chaguaramas (CSME), which contains provisions that allow for the free movement of, inter alia, skilled workers throughout the Caribbean region. One of the unintended consequences was that, following the Myrie decision in the CCJ, the regional court asserted its jurisdiction over matters affecting regional immigration.

All of this means the country must now brace for an all out assault by prospective immigrants from the region looking to settle there. It was a really dumb thing to commit to and I am very happy that we in the Bahamas refused.
you are right, we should not have signed on to this CSME nonsense. A lot of the countries in the region are not doing well financially/economically so they busy looking for people to blame, to take their country citizen from focusing on their own failures. Up to now no one is addressing a very important point in this whole saga.

Back in the days Jamaicans migrated to the US/UK and Canada to get better opportunities, thats why they have an even larger diaspora than those who live on the homeland (same can be said for Guyana and Haiti). After the US/UK/Canada made it harder for Jamaicans to enter, yes Jamaica is actually ban from the US visa lottery for a couple years now. They started going to Turks, Bahamas, Cayman, Antigua...but those countries put a stop to it and now the Jamaicans extended their reach and trying to get into Barbados and Trinidad (which is far away). Anyway so people should address this point, that the exchange rate is 105-1, things are getting tougher for the average Jamaican to do well. Notwithstanding their are some very rich people on the island.

In Trinidad's context now, we cannot play fast and loose with our borders, we were always lax and allowed hundreds upon thousands of illegal Vincies, Grenadians, Bajans, Guyanese and even Venezuelans to come in. Now we reaping the whirlwind from that because they did not have proper settlement patterns, a lot of these people built and magnified ghettos on the cusp of Port of Spain, while they did contribute, we cannot negate the fact that we were too loose with who got into the country.

Also, this wanton bringing in of any side, can be viewed as RACIAL voter padding...A large number of Jamaicans and other small islands people can be looked on with suspicion from the UNC/Indo group who always lashed out against the perceived manufactured voted blocs of the PNM/Afro base.

And a large influx of Indo Guyanese and Indians can be viewed with suspicion by the PNM/Afro group who always looked on with suspicion at the rather close ties with UNC governments and Guyana.

Also, other caribbean nationals were angry at Kamla for her ATM statement, granted she may not have said it in the most diplomatic manner she was correct. Trinidad for a while was the father giver of the West Indians, not saying that we should look back at things done, cuz we can never know what can happen in the future. But we never really got good treatment in return.

Manning opened a Caribbean fund, dont know what they did with the money. Ralph Gonsalves was in Port of Spain every Monday morning asking for more. I have no problems giving and being nice to our brothers and sisters but at the end of the day you all have nothing good to say about us, we have good and bad but they only know the bad.
 
17000 illegals in Trinidad? dem nuh have no ambition deport dem yes.
truth be told if you are an ambitious person and hardworking, you can make a decent life in Trinidad and Tobago. granted you can do that in most places but u know what i mean.

Namey why are you not addressing the fundamental issue? what is wrong that so many Jamaicans are forced to migrate everywhere?

Are you all advocating to improve things or you intend to chill with IMF? serious thing now, no country ever went to IMF and got better as a result of IMF policies.
 

Namey Namey

Registered User
truth be told if you are an ambitious person and hardworking, you can make a decent life in Trinidad and Tobago. granted you can do that in most places but u know what i mean.

Namey why are you not addressing the fundamental issue? what is wrong that so many Jamaicans are forced to migrate everywhere?

Are you all advocating to improve things or you intend to chill with IMF? serious thing now, no country ever went to IMF and got better as a result of IMF policies.
What is wrong that so many Trinis migrate everywhere, I do also doubt there are 17000 illegal Jamaicans in Trinidad. the way you people act about oil, you would think Trinidad would look like Dubia. You really think these people wouldn't be rounded up, and scapegoated for the high crime rate.
 
What is wrong that so many Trinis migrate everywhere, I do also doubt there are 17000 illegal Jamaicans in Trinidad. the way you people act about oil, you would think Trinidad would look like Dubia. You really think these people wouldn't be rounded up, and scapegoated for the high crime rate.
Namey, you dont get it do you? Trinidad is no Dubai, as i stated before we have chronic social ills, crime and corruption.

we never lived up to our potential and an unchecked immigration policy helped to increase our problem

you have never been to Trinidad, you do not understand how immigration made things worse in trinidad, not saying that immigrants are all responsible for crime

but yeah back to the topic, why are jamaicans not as passionate about calling for economic reform?
 

Namey Namey

Registered User
Namey, you dont get it do you? Trinidad is no Dubai, as i stated before we have chronic social ills, crime and corruption.

we never lived up to our potential and an unchecked immigration policy helped to increase our problem

you have never been to Trinidad, you do not understand how immigration made things worse in trinidad, not saying that immigrants are all responsible for crime

but yeah back to the topic, why are jamaicans not as passionate about calling for economic reform?
Not sure why you asking me this, Jamaica has clueless leaders with no spine. Trinidad may be richer than Jamaica as a country, but I doubt their standard of living is much better than Jamaica.
 
Not sure why you asking me this, Jamaica has clueless leaders with no spine. Trinidad may be richer than Jamaica as a country, but I doubt their standard of living is much better than Jamaica.
Namey, i realize u cant carry on a discussion without comparing and belittling
 

Namey Namey

Registered User
Namey, i realize u cant carry on a discussion without comparing and belittling
The question you are asking makes no sense to me, that is a question for the leadership of the country. As far as me belittling, I don't see where you are coming from. I think the reason Trinis and Bajans has a reputation of treating people the way they do, is because they don't have a realistic view of themselves.
 
Top