What comes to mind when you see this pic??

Wadadlineko

Registered User


how does this pic tie into your life? were you the girl, the mother/hairdresser, the onlooker?

caption "
I got my hair pressed couple times. In fact I still have my ironing comb. I remember getting burned all the time and not from the actual comb touching my scalp but from the heat being emitted from the comb. They sell electric ones to it. It looks exactly the same except you plug it in. Never bought one though.
-______-
 

triniameri

Hey Ms. Carter...
I got my hair pressed couple times. In fact I still have my ironing comb. I remember getting burned all the time and not from the actual comb touching my scalp but from the heat being emitted from the comb. They sell electric ones to it. It looks exactly the same except you plug it in. Never bought one though.
-______-
The electric ones are not as good as the old fashion cast iron ones...I thermal iron press my hair as well as my child ...she is begging me to get a relaxer I know eventually she will do it but hopefully it's when she gets older and pays for it on her own ..right now its the Dominicans, my Guyanese hairdresser or my house
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
lol.. yea that excessive heat is murderous... i killed off the dryers at the hairdresser all together.. i can't stand sitting there getting my hair dried... now i come in and in 45 mins or less i'm out of the salon.. wash and blowdry.. literally.. that constant heat no no no...
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
Many little boys jump off walls and trees in the attempt to fly like Superman. I don't think years down the line they still harbor the belief that they can fly. That's why ppl grow up. A certain mentality, way of thinking or desire doesn't necessarily stick with you forever.
Girl I like the way you are arguing your points.

Like I said on the first thread I saw this pic is that people need to get over themselves and stop fussing about the way people care for their and their children's hair!

I also said that all the little children in my life right now are white and I hair no fussing and arguing and discussions of self hate when the little white girls get their hair straightened or curled or say "T, I want to be black just like you".

Some people just need to sit down and cool it!!!!
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
one question though...

do you think that some folks over do it with the haircare?? like where the child have so many clips tightly placed in the hair that you seeing their scalp tender? where the sides of the hair eat away from being pulled so tight... where there are burns on the scalp from relaxer or pressing combs, hot irons etc? would you relax your child under 10's hair??
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
I am tracking back to address the two "douglas" who seem to have such strong opinions on this process. I've seen both your hair in photos and in real and I am saying that you cannot personally identify with the maintenance of hair types of the less mixed africans like myself and the child in the photo_One of you voiced about 'too young for straight hair" what is that supposed to mean???? Who gave you or where did you conceive the notion that straight hairstyles are earned by a certain age?

I have friends who have half african children, some girls hair dead straight from birth, some girls curly, they are all the same age, so which ones are too young to have straight hair?! hmmmm

My hair is softer and longer than the typical "african" and it's still tuff tuff, from childhood to my present age I sometimes cry when maintaining my afro.

So I say let people do what they have to do where hair grooming is concerned oui!
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
one question though...

do you think that some folks over do it with the haircare?? like where the child have so many clips tightly placed in the hair that you seeing their scalp tender? where the sides of the hair eat away from being pulled so tight... where there are burns on the scalp from relaxer or pressing combs, hot irons etc? would you relax your child under 10's hair??
Christmas tree head and carnival head is a cultural thing oui. I've never seem with my own two eyes the damage you described.
 

dollbabi

Earth Angel
I am tracking back to address the two "douglas" who seem to have such strong opinions on this process. I've seen both your hair in photos and in real and I am saying that you cannot personally identify with the maintenance of hair types of the less mixed africans like myself and the child in the photo_One of you voiced about 'too young for straight hair" what is that supposed to mean???? Who gave you or where did you conceive the notion that straight hairstyles are earned by a certain age?

I have friends who have half african children, some girls hair dead straight from birth, some girls curly, they are all the same age, so which ones are too young to have straight hair?! hmmmm

My hair is softer and longer than the typical "african" and it's still tuff tuff, from childhood to my present age I sometimes cry when maintaining my afro.

So I say let people do what they have to do where hair grooming is concerned oui!
I have a couple short posts in here. So since when I have such strong opinions? Secondly, my post stated the following:

Well, pressing hair achieves the same result as blowdrying/flat ironing. So it's not necessarily a big deal for someone to get her hair pressed. This girl is simply too young.
Point to where I stated that the child was too young to get her hair straightened. I was speaking strictly about the pressing comb, not certain other methods of straightening.

Lastly, why this talk about people not identifying due to being less african? Don't you think that people have non-mixed individuals in their family or that mixed & predominantly African people have different textures? One African family member did the hair of all the boat load children in our family (whether mixed or not) and he would make the same statement regarding the pressing comb. If you are not aware of any other methods of straightening a child's hair, then express that. However, please do refrain from making assumptions regarding people's actual opinions or experiences.
 
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ladyrastafari

Notchilous
I am tracking back to address the two "douglas" who seem to have such strong opinions on this process. I've seen both your hair in photos and in real and I am saying that you cannot personally identify with the maintenance of hair types of the less mixed africans like myself and the child in the photo.One of you voiced about 'too young for straight hair" what is that supposed to mean???? Who gave you or where did you conceive the notion that straight hairstyles are earned by a certain age?

I have friends who have half african children, some girls hair dead straight from birth, some girls curly, they are all the same age, so which ones are too young to have straight hair?! hmmmm

My hair is softer and longer than the typical "african" and it's still tuff tuff, from childhood to my present age I sometimes cry when maintaining my afro.

So I say let people do what they have to do where hair grooming is concerned oui!
to address, the bolded, really and truly this is an erroneous statement, this implies, quite wrongfully i might add, that i have never ever had to take care of somebody whose hair had a degree of curl greater than my own.. and that's absolutely NOT true and quite facetious on top of that... You think everybody i know have soft hair??? umm no.. sorry to burst that bubble.. I have personally maintained those types of hair on an everyday-for-school basis for friends daughters, sisters, relatives and neighbors children whose mothers couldn't do it for some reason or the other.. My best friends mother died when we were 10 or 11 and as a result she came to my home every sunday to have her hair washed and combed for school by my mother and i witnessed the way that my mother took care of her hair and to this DATE, my friend's hair is still natural and well taken care of...

the next comment about "too young for straight hair"... i think the comment was intended to mean that that child seemed a bit young to be subjected to all that extra heat and possible burns from that hot comb.. a sentiment voiced by someone older that i asked about that pic just last night... i dont think she was implying that straight hair was earned by a certain age BUT just as we on that topic, who are we trying to fool.. NUFF little girls get their hair canerowed when they younger and then as they get older their mothers consent to let them get their hair relaxed so just what the hell is so wrong with that statement when it is TRUE?? aint that what goes on every day all over the place.. lil lisa get her hair in box plaits, or canerows or whatever, all natural then lisa getting ready to go in secondary school and mummy say she could get a relaxer.. hell in some homes she getting dat relaxer while she still in primary school.. and then the days of hair gel begin... slick like rick going to school... so really?? why all the pretense as though this is unheard of..

my cousin's daughter has african hair and she used to cry when getting her hair done.. long tears... you think we didnt find ways to soften the hair by moisturizing it and using proper techniques to get her hair combed with minimum tears to her?? come nah man.. you think it dont have indian parents who have dougla children who hair more on the african side and they don't damn well know how to comb them chirren hair?? if you know how to comb hair, you know how to comb hair..
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
Christmas tree head and carnival head is a cultural thing oui. I've never seem with my own two eyes the damage you described.
well i have.. i mean however people wnt to comb dey chirren hair daiz dem.. if they dont know how to maintain it properly den de chirren will simply hold down a case of alopecia.. small ting.. nobody else concern but theirs...
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
I have a couple short posts in here. So since when I have such strong opinions? Secondly, my post stated the following:



Point to where I stated that the child was too young to get her hair straightened. I was speaking strictly about the pressing comb, not certain other methods of straightening.

Lastly, why this talk about people not identifying due to being less african? Don't you think that people have non-mixed individuals in their family or that mixed & predominantly African people have different textures? One African family member did the hair of all the boat load children in our family (whether mixed or not) and he would make the same statement regarding the pressing comb. If you are not aware of any other methods of straightening a child's hair, then express that. However, please do refrain from making assumptions regarding people's actual opinions or experiences.

I dunno where peopel get this sillly idea that you only exposed to people with hair EXACTLY like yours??? dey think people never comb a cousin or friend hair? smh
 

BacchanalDiva

Registered User
I see the pic and I think... oh a lil girl getting her hair pressed... ok. We don't know if this is a weekly thing or if it's for some occasion. Once the child's hair is washed it goes back to normal.
Hmmm..I'm undecided if this is really that trivial...even say it was a special occasion, aren't you still teaching the child that straight is the only way to go when it really matters?

1st time I got a press & curl was for my aunt's wedding..I remember looking in the mirror and being stunned at how long my hair was after the heat killed the kinks..then after it was curled being in the mirror memorized by the way it bounced and swayed. I was sooo mad the day after the wedding when my mom had my sis braid my hair back up cause I wanted to go to school like that. My hair only got pressed for special occasions for years after that but the mindset that gave me is that my natural kinks were for everyday wear but when it was time to turn me into a pretty princess, the straightening comb came out.

Might seem dramatic; but, I think its worth looking deeper into all the subtle ways we send messages to our lil girls that will have lasting effects on how they see themselves and the world.
 
S

sharkie

Guest
Hmmm..I'm undecided if this is really that trivial...even say it was a special occasion, aren't you still teaching the child that straight is the only way to go when it really matters?

1st time I got a press & curl was for my aunt's wedding..I remember looking in the mirror and being stunned at how long my hair was after the heat killed the kinks..then after it was curled being in the mirror memorized by the way it bounced and swayed. I was sooo mad the day after the wedding when my mom had my sis braid my hair back up cause I wanted to go to school like that. My hair only got pressed for special occasions for years after that but the mindset that gave me is that my natural kinks were for everyday wear but when it was time to turn me into a pretty princess, the straightening comb came out.

Might seem dramatic; but, I think its worth looking deeper into all the subtle ways we send messages to our lil girls that will have lasting effects on how they see themselves and the world.
That mindset is exactly what would drive that horse Wendy Williams to say that Viola from The Help didn't look fit for the runway with her natural look for the Oscars.
 

ladyrastafari

Notchilous
Hmmm..I'm undecided if this is really that trivial...even say it was a special occasion, aren't you still teaching the child that straight is the only way to go when it really matters?

1st time I got a press & curl was for my aunt's wedding..I remember looking in the mirror and being stunned at how long my hair was after the heat killed the kinks..then after it was curled being in the mirror memorized by the way it bounced and swayed. I was sooo mad the day after the wedding when my mom had my sis braid my hair back up cause I wanted to go to school like that. My hair only got pressed for special occasions for years after that but the mindset that gave me is that my natural kinks were for everyday wear but when it was time to turn me into a pretty princess, the straightening comb came out.

Might seem dramatic; but, I think its worth looking deeper into all the subtle ways we send messages to our lil girls that will have lasting effects on how they see themselves and the world.
and THIS is the message that the quote on the pic was delivering.. at least SOMEBODY saw it.. and answering the part where i asked "were you the child",...
 

dollbabi

Earth Angel
Hmmm..I'm undecided if this is really that trivial...even say it was a special occasion, aren't you still teaching the child that straight is the only way to go when it really matters?

1st time I got a press & curl was for my aunt's wedding..I remember looking in the mirror and being stunned at how long my hair was after the heat killed the kinks..then after it was curled being in the mirror memorized by the way it bounced and swayed. I was sooo mad the day after the wedding when my mom had my sis braid my hair back up cause I wanted to go to school like that. My hair only got pressed for special occasions for years after that but the mindset that gave me is that my natural kinks were for everyday wear but when it was time to turn me into a pretty princess, the straightening comb came out.

Might seem dramatic; but, I think its worth looking deeper into all the subtle ways we send messages to our lil girls that will have lasting effects on how they see themselves and the world.
Good points...and I'm glad you're the one who brought that up.

That mindset is exactly what would drive that horse Wendy Williams to say that Viola from The Help didn't look fit for the runway with her natural look for the Oscars.
That was so ridiculous. Viola surely looked much more fit for the runway than Wendy who usually resembles a horse.

and THIS is the message that the quote on the pic was delivering.. at least SOMEBODY saw it.. and answering the part where i asked "were you the child",...
Those who wanted to understand the thrust did just that, even though there wasn't a story behind the picture. I don't necessary have a problem with straightening a child's hair when it isn't permanent or harsh. But we do have to be careful about the message we are sending to them...
 

Mrs. Campbell

Girl Crush
Good points...and I'm glad you're the one who brought that up.



That was so ridiculous. Viola surely looked much more fit for the runway than Wendy who usually resembles a horse.



Those who wanted to understand the thrust did just that, even though there wasn't a story behind the picture. I don't necessary have a problem with straightening a child's hair when it isn't permanent or harsh. But we do have to be careful about the message we are sending to them...
I usually think man; but I can see horse...especially when she smile. lol
 

Nica

SAINTSational
Hmmm..I'm undecided if this is really that trivial...even say it was a special occasion, aren't you still teaching the child that straight is the only way to go when it really matters?

1st time I got a press & curl was for my aunt's wedding..I remember looking in the mirror and being stunned at how long my hair was after the heat killed the kinks..then after it was curled being in the mirror memorized by the way it bounced and swayed. I was sooo mad the day after the wedding when my mom had my sis braid my hair back up cause I wanted to go to school like that. My hair only got pressed for special occasions for years after that but the mindset that gave me is that my natural kinks were for everyday wear but when it was time to turn me into a pretty princess, the straightening comb came out.

Might seem dramatic; but, I think its worth looking deeper into all the subtle ways we send messages to our lil girls that will have lasting effects on how they see themselves and the world.
Well that's where people will interpret the image differently. I never had that mindset because that was not my experience. I got my hair pressed 1 time as a child. I was about 7 or 8 and I was irritated by the process and I really didn't care what my hair looked like. I look at the photos from that day and my hair was still thick and poofy.

My hair got relaxed for the first time when I was 9 and then the second time when I was 12 and continued from there. My aunt was a hairdresser and she changed her hair from relaxed to buzz cut and natural to whatever she wanted when the mood hit her. So I never attached much meaning or internalized anything when it came to hair. I always felt like people change their hair whenever, no big deal. Plus my family did not instill in me that your hair have to be a certain way to be pretty.

I stopped relaxing my hair because I wanted to get away from the damage of a relaxer. I wanted to have versatility and I have that with my natural hair. I can be straight if I want and I can rock my fro if I want.
 
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