what u know about Irish patois??

sankofaa

New member
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UP4nXlKJx_4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Sounds almost like hebrew
 
N

NaturalBornRidah

Guest
Delete this thread, there is no such thing as Irish patois, just an Irish language, you get to be amazingly dumb.
 

Inquistive

New member
There are over 150,000 people who still speak it, but they aren't monolingual. The English language replaces every language it inhabits. It can't be resisted.
 

SKBai1991

Registered User
There are over 150,000 people who still speak it, but they aren't monolingual. The English language replaces every language it inhabits. It can't be resisted.
there are some monolinguals but it's increasingly rare, most are either elderly or under 5 years old and havent gone to school yet
 

Klang

Real Patriot
wow since they on de same island i thought gaelic would sound somewhat close to english
 

SKBai1991

Registered User
I thought English was the household language in Ireland.
for most of the country it is, but there are parts of Ireland where Irish is still the dominant everyday language. Gaelic is mandatory for the most part in schools so a large percentage of the population can speak it, but most are more comfortable in English.

wow since they on de same island i thought gaelic would sound somewhat close to english
Well they arent on the same island, and they actually arent even related languages. Kreyol and Spanish are much more related to each other than Gaelic and English are.
 

Klang

Real Patriot
for most of the country it is, but there are parts of Ireland where Irish is still the dominant everyday language. Gaelic is mandatory for the most part in schools so a large percentage of the population can speak it, but most are more comfortable in English.



Well they arent on the same island, and they actually arent even related languages. Kreyol and Spanish are much more related to each other than Gaelic and English are.
northern island not on de same island?
 

Carib2

Registered User
LOL Irish Patois :kicks


wow since they on de same island i thought gaelic would sound somewhat close to english
English is a Germanic language close to Dutch, German, Frisian etc

Gaelic or Irish is a celtic language similar to Scottish gaelic, Welsh and Cornish.
 

SKBai1991

Registered User
thought they quite culturally different historically
not really. Northern Ireland has alot of people who were brought over to Ireland from Scotland but other than that they aren't that different. The differences are more political than cultural. Even today, if you're born in Northern Ireland you're still eligible for Irish citizenship.
 

Klang

Real Patriot
LOL Irish Patois :kicks




English is a Germanic language close to Dutch, German, Frisian etc

Gaelic or Irish is a celtic language similar to Scottish gaelic, Welsh and Cornish.
ok i understand, so basically the ènglish are not native to the british islesÉ
 

Carib2

Registered User
ok i understand, so basically the ènglish are not native to the british islesÉ
No, Germanic tribes brought/helped develop the language - the Anglo Saxons. British/English people are a mix of Germanic peoples, roman etc etc.. a melting pot really
 

SKBai1991

Registered User
No, Germanic tribes brought/helped develop the language - the Anglo Saxons. British/English people are a mix of Germanic peoples, roman etc etc.. a melting pot really
Well the English people are a mix of Celts, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, and Scandinavians but the English language itself is not indigenous to the British Isles. The original inhabitants of the British Isles spoke various Celtic languages prior to the settlement of Anglo-Saxons.
 

TweetaFineeta

&#9608;&#9829;&#9608; TORONTONIAN &#9608;&#9829;&#
Title is interesting, and actually important. There are Irish roots in patois and various West Indian accents. Just as long as you know Gaelic languages aren't really a 'dialects' of languages, or a mixture of 'dialects'... they are actual languages.
 

jamaicangirl

Boonoonoonoos
My Irish coworker said that he knows Irish from school because it is mandatory but that he never speaks it at home. He is not nationalistic because he is half English and non-religious so maybe there are other people who take more pride in the national language.
 
Top