Woman shot by off-duty officer dies

dollbabi

Earth Angel
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Woman shot by off-duty officer dies | abc7chicago.com

March 22, 2012 (CHICAGO) (WLS) -- A woman shot by an off-duty Chicago police officer on Wednesday morning died Thursday. Family members say she was an innocent bystander and are calling for an investigation into her death.

"How could this be justified? They took my sister away from me," said Martinez Sutton, the brother of 22-year-old Rekia Boyd.

The suburban man is grieving the loss of his sister, who died Thursday at Mount Sinai Hospital after being shot in the head by an off-duty Chicago police officer.

Boyd and a man were both shot early Wednesday morning by an off-duty detective on the city's West Side.

Family and friends who were at Boyd's side when she passed away Thursday are calling for a federal investigation into her death.

Boyd's family insists she was an innocent bystander.

"This young beautiful girl dead in the streets. Why?" said Sutton.

Boyd's family brought two photos of her Thursday to the hospital. In the first, she is a smiling, happy 22-year-old woman. The second photo was snapped shortly before she died.

"All we want to know is what happened?" said Sutton.

Just after 1 a.m. Wednesday morning, the police union says, an off-duty detective rolled down his car window and asked a group of people gathered near Douglas Park to quiet down. In response, police say, a 39-year-old man pointed a gun at the officer, who drew his own weapon and fired. The bullets hit the alleged gunman in the hand and Rekia Boyd in the head as she stood nearby.

"They said the shooting is justified, but how is it justified when you got a young girl up there with a bullet hole in her head? What kind of justice is that?" said Sutton.

Witnesses told ABC 7 Wednesday that no one pulled a gun on the off-duty officer. And prosecutors only charged the man who police say had a gun with aggravated assault, a misdemeanor.

"There were 60-70 people in the park and no one had a gun. Everyone was just out there to hang out, that's it," said witness Leo Coleman on Wednesday. Coleman is the alleged gunman's cousin.

Boyd's large family from south suburban Dolton sees similarities between what happened to her and the case of the unarmed Florida teen shot by a neighborhood watch volunteer.

"First you got Trayvon, now you got Rekia," Sutton said. "Senseless, senseless violence. It didn't have to happen."

The Independent Police Review Authority is investigating the shooting.

Late Thursday afternoon, the Chicago Police Department told ABC 7 that CPD had been in contact with Boyd's family and would like to express sincere condolences.
 

LB

Peace Love n Pretty Tings
" In response, police say, a 39-year-old man pointed a gun at the officer, who drew his own weapon and fired. The bullets hit the alleged gunman in the hand and Rekia Boyd in the head as she stood nearby."

""There were 60-70 people in the park and no one had a gun. Everyone was just out there to hang out, that's it,"

They need to establish if there was a gun or not because if one was drawn and he was firing back, then her death isnt on the off-duty police officer but the man who drew the gun in the first place.

but if there really wasnt a gun and the off-duty guy was being trigger happy, then he should pay for his actions.
 
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MÉCHANT LOUP

Cervical Cancer
but if there really wasnt a gun and the off-duty guy was being trigger happy, then he should pay for his actions.

Serious question...


So, when a gun is drawn and displayed on you.

or...

Some "reaches" in their pocket or waistband.


When do you decide I shud' draw and fire?
 

LB

Peace Love n Pretty Tings
I'm going off the tone of the article. The other witnesses give the impression that there was no provocation and the gun was fired. None of which makes sense.
Not enough details to be condemning anyone so far, was my point.
 

MÉCHANT LOUP

Cervical Cancer
I'm going off the tone of the article. The other witnesses give the impression that there was no provocation and the gun was fired. None of which makes sense.
Not enough details to be condemning anyone so far, was my point.

The question is a general scenario that I'm asking specifically to you.

Please answer.
 

BostonG

Bamcee Connoisseur
but if the man who pull the gun on the officer get shot in the hand, and was arrested then the cops should have the gun no? he was charged with just a misdemeanor though, which makes no sense if he pulled and pointed a gun at a cop.
Then again, if a cop in a car pulls up and from his window tells you to quiet down amongst all those people why not do it over the loudspeaker?
 

LIONESS onda RISE

Registered User
but if the man who pull the gun on the officer get shot in the hand, and was arrested then the cops should have the gun no? he was charged with just a misdemeanor though, which makes no sense if he pulled and pointed a gun at a cop.
Then again, if a cop in a car pulls up and from his window tells you to quiet down amongst all those people why not do it over the loudspeaker?
becuase there was no gun!!!!they didnt find a gun..maybe the man who had the gun ate it..
 

Alpha Unit

Insurgent
I'm going off the tone of the article. The other witnesses give the impression that there was no provocation and the gun was fired. None of which makes sense.
Not enough details to be condemning anyone so far, was my point.
It's not likely that any witness would admit to seeing a gun drawn on the officer.
 

LIONESS onda RISE

Registered User
It's not likely that any witness would admit to seeing a gun drawn on the officer.
true..but no gun was recoved..soo...where did it go? and how come the man wasnt charged accordingly?

these officers have a tough job...but when something like this happens, there has to be accountablity. they can accuse all they want, but if they have no proof..(no gun/weapon) then they need to be accountable. how many stories do we hear of an officers claiming someone has a gun/weapon? that person ends up dead..and no weapon is found..recovered..and only the officers word is taken?

nah..that has to stop
 

Taj

Loyalty to Loyalty
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/....html?utm_hp_ref=black-voices&ir=Black Voices

Chicago Police Officer Dante Servin, 45, is charged with involuntary manslaughter, reckless discharge of a firearm and reckless conduct in the March 2012 shooting death of Rekia Boyd, 22.

Boyd was an innocent bystander on March 21, 2012 when Servin responded to a noise disturbance call. Servin exchanged words with Antonio Cross, who was causing the disturbance. Once the officer turned away from Cross, he alleges he saw Cross pull out a gun, which in fact was actually a cell phone. But Servin already had his guns blazing. Cross was shot in the thumb and Boyd was shot in the head.

“It’s a sad day when charges are warranted against a police officer, but we feel very strongly that in this particular case Ms. Rekia Boyd lost her life for no reason,” State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez told reporters after the bond hearing.

“(Boyd) was doing nothing and was shot in the back of the head,” Alvarez said. “And in evaluating all the facts that I saw, I felt that his actions were not appropriate, not justified and were reckless.”

Servin has been on desk duty since the shooting, but is expected to be stripped of his police powers. A Fraternal Order of Police spokesman said Servin is a decorated police veteran who has served since the early 1990s and was trying to defend himself that night.

“It’s a sad day when an officer’s charged for doing something that he’s trained to do,” Pat Camden told reporters at the courthouse.

Servin faces anything from probation to five years in prison if convicted of involuntary manslaughter, the most serious charge.

The city previously paid $4.5 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit brought by Boyd’s estate.

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